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Archive for the ‘transportation’ category: Page 5

Oct 20, 2020

1750HP SSC Tuatara crushed Bugatti speed record, became the world’s fastest car with 508.7 km/h

Posted by in category: transportation

The worlds fastest car!?


The title of world’s fastest production vehicle is now snatched by the SSC Tuatara from the hands of Bugatti.

Continue reading “1750HP SSC Tuatara crushed Bugatti speed record, became the world’s fastest car with 508.7 km/h” »

Oct 19, 2020

Jaunt’s ROSA gyrodyne: The first eVTOL air taxi that actually looks safe

Posted by in category: transportation

This eVTOL air taxi design looks like a weird helicopter/plane hybrid, but it’s the safest of all the eVTOL designs we’ve ever seen, and it has another killer advantage in that it requires no special certification. That’s huge news in the emerging 3D commuting market, because it could make this thing much, much cheaper to get off the ground.

To understand why this thing is such a great idea, let’s recap two of the main hurdles that every other eVTOL designer is facing: safety and certification. The safety issue seems huge to us, although many of the eVTOL manufacturers we speak to don’t seem to see it as insurmountable. In a total failure scenario, all eVTOLs designed around multiple small rotors have a bit of an issue: they’ll simply plummet to the ground.

You can solve this problem using a ballistic parachute that fires out and brings them down gently, but below a certain altitude, maybe 120 feet or so, these ‘chutes don’t have time to fully open and deploy, leaving these aircraft negotiating what we’ve been calling a “death zone” every time they take off and land. It’s only for a short amount of time, but the consequences of total failure in this zone would be equally total, and just one such crash in the early days of air taxi services would undermine passengers’ faith in the entire eVTOL sector.

Oct 19, 2020

New insight brings sustainable hydrogen one step closer

Posted by in categories: chemistry, particle physics, sustainability, transportation

Leiden chemists Marc Koper and Ian McCrum have discovered that the degree to which a metal binds to the oxygen atom of water is decisive for how well the chemical conversion of water to molecular hydrogen takes place. This insight helps to develop better catalysts for the production of sustainable hydrogen, an important raw material for the chemical industry and the fuel needed for environmentally friendly hydrogen cars. Publication in Nature Energy.

For years there has been a heated debate in the literature: how to speed up the electrochemical production of on platinum electrodes in an alkaline environment? Chemist Ian McCrum watched from the sidelines and concluded that part of the debate was caused by the fact that the debaters were looking at slightly different electrodes, making the results incomparable. Time to change that, McCrum thought, who was a LEaDing Fellow postdoc in the group of Professor Marc Koper at the time.

Oct 19, 2020

Perfect Energy Efficiency: Quantum Engines With Entanglement as Fuel?

Posted by in categories: energy, quantum physics, transportation

University of Rochester researcher receives $1 million grant to study quantum thermodynamics.

It’s still more science fiction than science fact, but perfect energy efficiency may be one step closer due to new research at the University of Rochester.

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Oct 19, 2020

LA Cops Use Aircraft to Hunt Mystery Jetpack Dude

Posted by in categories: law enforcement, transportation

Cops are now hunting down the “jetpack dude” who has been flying around near LAX. Some people are calling it an accident waiting to happen.


The FBI is on the case as well.

Oct 19, 2020

Car design is about to change forever. This video encapsulates how

Posted by in categories: futurism, transportation

The car of the future is a skateboard, and whatever you want goes on top.

Oct 18, 2020

Tesla battery researcher shows new test results pointing to batteries lasting over 2 million miles

Posted by in categories: sustainability, transportation

A Tesla battery researcher showed updated test results pointing to batteries lasting over 15,000 cycles or the equivalent of over 2 million miles (3.5 million km) in an electric car.

Last year, we reported on Jeff Dahn and his lab, who are under contract to do battery research for Tesla, releasing an interesting paper that shows how the latest Li-ion battery technology can produce batteries that would last 1 million miles in electric vehicles.

In a new presentation, Dahn discussed updated test results from this new battery, which he hopes becomes the new standard Li-ion battery that new battery technologies benchmark themselves against.

Oct 17, 2020

The First Look at Boom’s Supersonic Plane

Posted by in categories: business, transportation

It’s been almost 20 years since the Concorde was retired, putting an end to commercial supersonic flight for the very rich. But out in Colorado, the startup Boom Technology has raised $160 million in its quest to build a replacement, one that should be cheaper, more comfortable and able to fly more routes. Here’s an exclusive first look at Boom’s prototype test plane, the XB-1.

#HelloWorld #Technology #Aviation

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Oct 17, 2020

AI that scans a construction site can spot when things are falling behind

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

Construction sites are vast jigsaws of people and parts that must be pieced together just so at just the right times. As projects get larger, mistakes and delays get more expensive. The consultancy Mckinsey estimates that on-site mismanagement costs the construction industry $1.6 trillion a year. But typically you might only have five managers overseeing construction of a building with 1,500 rooms, says Roy Danon, founder and CEO of British-Israeli startup Buildots: “There’s no way a human can control that amount of detail.”

Danon thinks that AI can help. Buildots is developing an image recognition system that monitors every detail of an ongoing construction project and flags up delays or errors automatically. It is already being used by two of the biggest building firms in Europe, including UK construction giant Wates in a handful of large residential builds. Construction is essentially a kind of manufacturing, says Danon. If high-tech factories now use AI to manage their processes, why not construction sites?

AI is starting to change various aspects of construction, from design to self-driving diggers. Some companies even provide a kind of overall AI site inspector that matches images taken on site against a digital plan of the building. Now Buildots is making that process easier than ever by using video footage from GoPro cameras mounted on the hard hats of workers.

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Oct 17, 2020

Cyberwar 2025

Posted by in categories: law, mobile phones, transportation

A short story.


A very short story with a long ending.

“What did you do in the Great Cyberwar daddy?”

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