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Archive for the ‘space’ category: Page 10

Jul 11, 2019

Allen Brain Explorer

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, space

The Allen Brain Explorer (beta) is an application that allows users to browse multimodal datasets in an annotated 3D spatial framework. This new application is an integrated web-based navigator, allowing users to explore the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas projection data and Allen Reference Atlas (ARA) in a standardized coordinate space.

The Brain Explorer 2 software is a desktop application for viewing the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas projection data and the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas gene expression data in the framework of the Allen Reference Atlas (ARA). This downloadable software will be discontinued in 2019, as improved functionality and new features will be available via the integrated web-based platform. Updates to this software will be discontinued after that time.

Jul 11, 2019

Japan’s Hayabusa2 probe makes ‘perfect’ touchdown on asteroid

Posted by in categories: materials, space

Japan’s Hayabusa2 probe made a “perfect” touchdown Thursday on a distant asteroid, collecting samples from beneath the surface in an unprecedented mission that could shed light on the origins of the solar system.

“We’ve collected a part of the solar system’s history,” project manager Yuichi Tsuda said at a jubilant press conference hours after the successful landing was confirmed.

“We have never gathered sub-surface material from a celestial body further away than the Moon,” he added.

Jul 11, 2019

A Japanese spacecraft just grabbed more rocks from the asteroid Ryugu

Posted by in categories: materials, space

Japanese spacecraft landed on the asteroid surface.


Hayabusa2 has collected a second sample from the asteroid’s surface. It could give us a unique insight into how the early solar system was formed.

The procedure: After a few hours of maneuvering, the spacecraft touched down on Ryugu’s surface at 9:15 p.m. US Eastern time yesterday. It then fired a bullet into the asteroid and collected some of the debris stirred up by the shot. The Japanese space agency JAXA tweeted that the mission had been a success and that the space probe had now left the surface again. It’s the second sampling mission after a similar one in April, and it required particularly careful preparations, because any problems could cause the materials gathered during the first operation to be lost. In April, Hayabusa2 had also fired a copper bomb into the asteroid’s surface to expose the rocks beneath, in anticipation of today’s mission.

Continue reading “A Japanese spacecraft just grabbed more rocks from the asteroid Ryugu” »

Jul 9, 2019

Race to lunar space

Posted by in category: space

Andrew Glester reviews Apollo 11: the Inside Story by David Whitehouse.

Jul 9, 2019

539 AD and 1014 AD… the tsunamis from hell

Posted by in category: space

An interesting article on how tsunamis caused by comets wiped out civilization in what is now the southeastern U.S. twice, in 539 and again in 1014. The bit about ammonia in the atmosphere also reminded me of the Norse prophecy about Thor wrestling with the Midgard Serpent, accompanied by poison in the air that kills many. I wonder how many strange things were witnessed by our ancestors for which they left us records that we are simply unable to understand.


Two massive comet or asteroid strikes in the past 1500 years altered Eastern North America’s history. The one in 539 AD devastated the South Atlantic Coast and permanently changed its geography. It left the South Atlantic Coastal Plain almost uninhabited. Hundreds of Uchee and Muskogean communities were wiped off the face of the earth. For obvious reasons, survivors headed north to the mountains.

tsunami-crashing

Continue reading “539 AD and 1014 AD… the tsunamis from hell” »

Jul 9, 2019

ESA Video: What It Takes to Survive on Mars

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

NASA life support analyst Lucie Poulet explains how analog missions work and what they tell us about future crewed missions.

Jul 8, 2019

NASA’s Giant Leaps: Past and Future

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

Fifty years ago, humans took their first steps on the Moon. The world watched as we made history.

On July 19 at 1 p.m. EDT, we’ll salute our #Apollo50th heroes and look forward to our next giant leap.

Will you be watching? https://go.nasa.gov/327ZDZs

Jul 8, 2019

NASA ScienceCasts: Watch the History of our Solar System Fly

Posted by in category: space

Scientists are unlocking clues about the earliest formation of our solar system from a Kuiper Belt Object known as 2014 MU69.

Jul 8, 2019

Who Gets to Decide What Our Space Settlements Look Like?

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

Let’s decolonize the future.

Jul 7, 2019

We should care more about the deep sea than we do deep space

Posted by in category: space

If we loved the deep sea as much as deep space, we might not have so many environmental problems.

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