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Archive for the ‘space’ category: Page 7

Jun 12, 2022

James Webb Space Telescope hit by a micrometeoroid, larger than what NASA had anticipated

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The James Webb Space Telescope dima_zel/ iStock

Between May 23 and 25, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was hit by a micrometeoroid that has impacted one of its primary mirror segments, NASA said in a recent update on its website. The telescope continues to function at levels exceeding mission requirements.

A meteoroid is a fragment of an asteroid and can be either large or small. A micrometeoroid, though, is a microscopic fragment of a meteoroid and is smaller than a grain of sand. NASA estimates that millions of meteoroids and micrometeoroids strike the Earth’s atmosphere every day but most burn up due to the friction.

Jun 12, 2022

This was one of NASA’s most dangerous spacewalks 😱

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Jun 12, 2022

Learn about the astonishing discoveries and near-misses of the New Horizons mission to Pluto 🚀

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#PlanetExplorers brings you epic stories of exploration and discovery around five bodies in our solar system, told by the scientists who love and study them.

Jun 12, 2022

Scientists show how our brain is a mini representation of the universe! And it’s amazing

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Jun 12, 2022

Astronomers have discovered the brightest pulsar yet in the universe

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Jun 12, 2022

Repeating fast radio bursts from space are mysterious. This one is even weirder

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This week, explore a mysterious burst of radio waves from space, meet a miraculous Galapagos tortoise, discover a fearsome dinosaur, learn what it takes to explore Venus, and more.

Jun 11, 2022

Navigation Sensor on Mars Helicopter Dead, NASA Says

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NASA’s Mars helicopter has run into a bit of trouble after 28 successful flights and well over an entire dusty Earth year into its mission on the Red Planet.

One of the four-pound rotorcraft’s navigation sensors has given out — an unfortunate new development, especially considering Martian winter is almost upon it. Extreme temperature swings could soon wreak havoc on the rest of the helicopter’s electronics.

But the team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab says their plucky rotorcraft isn’t finished yet.

Jun 10, 2022

Europe will launch a ‘lurking’ probe in 2029 to watch for an interstellar comet

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The probe will wait in space for a yet unknown, but very exciting, object to arrive.


Europe’s Comet Interceptor probe will lurk in space, waiting for a pristine interstellar comet to zoom by.

Jun 10, 2022

NASA announces a new investigation of unidentified aerial phenomena

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The agency will release a report on UAPs sometime next year after a nine-month investigation.


NASA will fund a “no more than $100,000 study” looking at what astrophysical data exists with unexplained origins led by astrophysicist David Spergel.

Jun 9, 2022

Putting the theory of special relativity into practice

Posted by in categories: physics, space

Scientists who study the cosmos have a favorite philosophy known as the “mediocrity principle,” which, in essence, suggests that there’s really nothing special about Earth, the sun or the Milky Way galaxy compared to the rest of the universe.

Now, new research from CU Boulder adds yet another piece of evidence to the case for mediocrity: Galaxies are, on average, at rest with respect to the . Jeremy Darling, a CU Boulder astrophysics professor, recently published this new cosmological finding in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

“What this research is telling us is that we have a funny motion, but that funny motion is consistent with everything we know about the —there’s nothing special going on here,” said Darling. “We’re not special as a galaxy or as observers.”

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