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Archive for the ‘space’ category: Page 7

Dec 18, 2019

The science news events that shaped 2019

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, ethics, quantum physics, science, space

A year marked by climate protests, political uncertainty and debate over the ethics of gene editing in human embryos proved challenging for science. But researchers also celebrated some exciting firsts — a quantum computer that can outperform its classical counterparts, a photo of a black hole and samples gathered from an asteroid.


Climate strikes, marsquakes and gaming AIs are among the year’s top stories.

Dec 18, 2019

What Is The Ultimate Fate Of The Loneliest Galaxy In The Universe?

Posted by in category: space

In the middle of a great cosmic void, a single, isolated galaxy persists amidst the darkness. It’s about to get a lot lonelier.

Dec 18, 2019

NASA Just Observed a Totally New Kind of Magnetic Eruption on The Sun

Posted by in category: space

The surface of the Sun is never still. Upon this burning ball of gas, a continual flow of super-hot plasma creates ropes of magnetic fields that can twist and tangle with one another.

As the star rotates, these invisible lines snap apart and join together again, bursting into flares, storms and eruptions of plasma.

Continue reading “NASA Just Observed a Totally New Kind of Magnetic Eruption on The Sun” »

Dec 17, 2019

NASA’s X-59 supersonic jet is cleared for final assembly

Posted by in category: space

NASA’s ultra-quiet X-59 supersonic jet could fly as soon as 2021.

Dec 17, 2019

Excitement Builds for Boeing’s 1st Starliner Test Launch Friday

Posted by in categories: space, transportation

The debut test flight of a Boeing Starliner astronaut taxi for NASA is ready to fly, with great weather expected for its launch to the International Space Station Friday (Dec. 20).

Dec 16, 2019

‘Cosmos’ with Neil deGrasse Tyson returns in March 2020

Posted by in category: space

National Geographic has announced that the much eagerly awaited science and space series ‘Cosmos’ will premiere in its network March 9th, 2020 with Neil DeGrasse Tyson reprising the role of the presenter, a series which has already seen huge success with its earlier versions.

Dec 14, 2019

NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover is getting a friend!

Posted by in category: space

NASA €™s Curiosity Mars Rover is getting a friend!

Next summer, #Mars2020 will be headed for the Red Planet. While the newest rover borrows from Curiosity’s design, they aren’t twins. Curiosity was designed to learn more about past water on Mars, and Mars 2020 will look for signs of past life.

Dec 14, 2019

Astrophysicists Discover a Neutron Star With a Bizarre Magnetic Field

Posted by in category: space

Scientists from Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI), and Pulkovo Observatory discovered a unique neutron star, the magnetic field of which is apparent only when the star is seen under a certain angle relative to the observer. Previously, all neutron stars could be grouped into two big families: the first one included objects where the magnetic field manifests itself during the whole spin cycle, and the other one included objects where the magnetic field is not measured at all. The neutron star GRO J2058+42 studied by the researchers offers an insight into the internal structure of neutron star’s magnetic field only at a certain phase of its rotational period. The work was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and supported by the Russian Science Foundation.

The neutron star in the GRO J2058+42 system was discovered almost quarter of a century ago with the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), USA. It belongs to the class of so-called transient X-ray pulsars. This object was studied using different instruments and nothing set it apart from other objects of its class. Only recent observations with the NuSTAR space observatory that has an outstanding combination of the high energy resolution (400 eV) and extremely wide energy range (3–79 keV), enabled the scientists to detect a peculiar feature in the pulsars emission, potentially making it the first object of its own family.

A cyclotron absorption line[1] was registered in the source energy spectrum[2] that allows estimating the magnetic field strength of the neutron star. Such an observational phenomenon (cyclotron line) is not new and is currently observed in approximately 30 X-ray pulsars. The uniqueness of the Russian scientists’ discovery is that this line manifests itself only when the neutron star is seen under a certain angle to the observer. This discovery became possible due to a detailed “tomographic” analysis of the system. X-ray spectra of the neutron star GROJ2058+42 were measured from ten different directions and only in one of them a significant depression in the emission intensity around 10 keV was found. This energy corresponds approximately to the magnetic field strength of 1012 G at the surface of the neutron star.

Continue reading “Astrophysicists Discover a Neutron Star With a Bizarre Magnetic Field” »

Dec 14, 2019

Focus: New Spaceship Sail Self-Centers

Posted by in category: space

A technology for propelling spacecraft using a “sail” pushed by light has passed an initial test, with the prototype device staying centered in a laser beam.

To snap close-up photos of planets outside our Solar System (exoplanets), some researchers are proposing the use of a fleet of “light sails” propelled by powerful Earth-bound lasers. A new experiment has demonstrated a possible sail design that uses diffraction gratings, rather than the reflective mirrors that have been used in previous sail designs. The gratings deflect an incoming laser beam at an angle, creating a sideways force that keeps the sail aligned with the beam’s center. Further testing is needed, but the team developing the sail is hopeful that their “beam-rider” technology could guide probes to faraway stars or to closer targets in our own Solar System.

Dec 14, 2019

Camera aboard NASA spacecraft confirms asteroid phenomenon

Posted by in category: space

WASHINGTON – A U.S. Naval Research Laboratory-built camera mounted on the NASA Parker Solar Probe revealed an asteroid dust trail that has eluded astronomers for decades.

Karl Battams, a computational scientist in NRL’s Space Science Division, discussed the results from the camera called Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) on Dec. 11 during a NASA press conference.

WISPR enabled researchers to identify the dust cloud trailing the orbit of the asteroid 3200 Phaethon.

Continue reading “Camera aboard NASA spacecraft confirms asteroid phenomenon” »

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