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Archive for the ‘solar power’ category: Page 5

Apr 21, 2024

Two companies enter historic, multimillion-dollar deal to manufacture solar panels domestically — here’s how it could affect American energy

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

A couple of solar-sector manufacturers have a powerhouse agreement that reaches a unique benchmark. Thanks to a $400 million, three-year deal between Heliene and Suniva, solar panels and cells will be entirely made in the U.S., a unique combination until now.

Electrek reports that to this point, solar cells — the contraption that turns sunlight into electricity — were imported.

Continue reading “Two companies enter historic, multimillion-dollar deal to manufacture solar panels domestically — here’s how it could affect American energy” »

Apr 21, 2024

Scientists unveil self-cleaning solar panel technology poised to revolutionize energy sector: ‘A major step’

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

Scientists developed a device that combines wind and solar to harvest clean energy more efficiently and create a self-cleaning solar panel.

Apr 19, 2024

Based Solar Power May be One Step Closer to Reality, Thanks to This Key Test (Video)

Posted by in categories: solar power, space, sustainability

Unlike solar panels on Earth, a solar power plant in space would provide a constant power supply 24/7.

Apr 19, 2024

New Physics at Play: Physicists Discover a New Force Acting on Water Droplets Moving Over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

Posted by in categories: physics, solar power, sustainability

Researchers at Aalto University have discovered a new force acting on water droplets moving over superhydrophobic surfaces like black silicon by adapting a novel force measurement technique to uncover the previously unidentified physics at play. This force, identified as air-shearing, challenges previous understandings and suggests modifications in the design of these surfaces to reduce drag, potentially improving their efficiency and application in various fields.

Microscopic chasms forming a sea of conical jagged peaks stipple the surface of a material called black silicon. While it’s commonly found in solar cell tech, black silicon also moonlights as a tool for studying the physics of how water droplets behave.

Black silicon is a superhydrophobic material, meaning it repels water. Due to water’s unique surface tension properties, droplets glide across textured materials like black silicon by riding on a thin air-film gap trapped beneath. This works great when the droplets move slowly—they slip and slide without a hitch.

Apr 18, 2024

Rapidly Dropping Battery Prices, Cheaper Electric Vehicles, & Solar Energy Ahead

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability, transportation

Battery prices are dropping significantly, leading to a future of cheaper electric vehicles, battery storage, solar energy, and cleaner air Questions to inspire discussion What is the impact of dropping battery prices? —Dropping battery prices will lead to cheaper electric vehicles, battery storage, solar energy, and.

Apr 14, 2024

A Solar cell you can Bend and Soak in, Water

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, solar power, wearables

Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and collaborators have developed an organic photovoltaic film that is both waterproof and flexible, allowing a solar cell to be put onto slothes and still function correctly after being rained on or even washed.

One of the potential uses of organic photovoltaics is to create wearable electronics — devices that can be attached to clothing that can monitor medical devices, for example, without requiring battery changes.

However, researchers have found it challenging to achieve waterproofing without the use of extra layers that end up decreasing the flexibility of the film.

Apr 8, 2024

Cleaning up Environmental Contaminants with Quantum Dot Technology

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, quantum physics, solar power

The 2023 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was focused on quantum dots – objects so tiny, they’re controlled by the strange and complex rules of quantum physics. Many quantum dots used in electronics are made from toxic substances, but their nontoxic counterparts are now being developed and explored for uses in medicine and in the environment. One team of researchers is focusing on carbon-and sulfur-based quantum dots, using them to create safer invisible inks and to help decontaminate water supplies.

The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Quantum dots are synthetic nanometer-scale semiconductor crystals that emit light. They are used in applications such as electronics displays and solar cells. “Many conventional quantum dots are toxic, because they’re derived from heavy metals,” explains Md Palashuddin Sk, an assistant professor of chemistry at Aligarh Muslim University in India. “So, we’re working on nonmetallic quantum dots because they’re environmentally friendly and can be used in biological applications.”

Apr 1, 2024

New device maximizes solar energy with self-cleaning tech

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

Solar energy is vital for sustainable future, but dust and other environmental factors dramatically reduces its energy efficiency.

Mar 31, 2024

Here’s what it’ll take to power Africa’s clean energy future

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

We – a team from Rwanda and Germany who work in the field of renewable energy scientific modelling – set out to find the answer by building the Renewable Power Plant Database Africa, the first on the continent. It’s a database of available open access data on hydro, wind and solar energy sources that we’ve analysed.

The database shows that some countries, such as Nigeria and Zimbabwe, have enough projects in the pipeline to potentially transition away from fossil fuels by 2050. And that 76% of all electricity required on the continent could come from renewable resources by 2040. This would happen if the capacity of existing hydro-, solar and wind power plants were fully utilised and if all plants currently on the drawing-board were built.

The 76% from renewables would be met by 82% hydropower, 11% solar power and 7% wind power. Hydropower has been the main renewable energy resource to date, but declining costs for solar photovoltaics (90% decline since 2009) and wind turbines (55%–60% decline since 2010) mean solar and wind have potential to lead sustainable renewable energy options.

Mar 29, 2024

Solar Power Surge: Sun Emits Intense X1.1 Flare

Posted by in categories: alien life, government, physics, solar power, sustainability

The Sun emitted a strong solar flare, peaking at 4:56 p.m. ET on March 28, 2024. NASA

Established in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government that succeeded the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). It is responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. Its vision is “To discover and expand knowledge for the benefit of humanity.” Its core values are “safety, integrity, teamwork, excellence, and inclusion.” NASA conducts research, develops technology and launches missions to explore and study Earth, the solar system, and the universe beyond. It also works to advance the state of knowledge in a wide range of scientific fields, including Earth and space science, planetary science, astrophysics, and heliophysics, and it collaborates with private companies and international partners to achieve its goals.

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