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Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category: Page 403

Jun 17, 2015

‘Brain-to-Text’ system converts speech brainwave patterns to text

Posted by in categories: futurism, neuroscience

Brain activity recorded by electrocorticography electrodes (blue circles). Spoken words are then decoded from neural activity patterns in the blue/yellow areas. (credit: CSL/KIT)

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Jun 16, 2015

Never Sleep Again, Using This Drug

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, futurism, neuroscience

If there was a drug that meant you never had to sleep again, would you take it? Would those who didn’t need to sleep have special advantages over those who did? All that and a side of zombies, in this week’s episode of Meanwhile in the Future.

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Jun 16, 2015

Scientists Just Invented the Neural Lace

Posted by in categories: futurism, neuroscience

In the Culture novels by Iain M. Banks, futuristic post-humans install devices on their brains called a “neural lace.” A mesh that grows with your brain, it’s essentially a wireless brain-computer interface. But it’s also a way to program your neurons to release certain chemicals with a thought. And now, there’s a neural lace prototype in real life.

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Jun 15, 2015

Implantable brain electronics is here

Posted by in categories: futurism, neuroscience

Mesh electronics being injected through sub-100 micrometer inner diameter glass needle into aqueous solution (credit: Lieber Research Group, Harvard University)

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Jun 13, 2015

Implant Fights Stroke, Tinnitus

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Microtransponder’s vagus nerve stimulator uses precisely-timed jolts to help stroke victims relearn movements more quickly

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Jun 9, 2015

When Computers Insist They’re Alive

Posted by in category: neuroscience

My latest article for Vice Motherboard. It’s about consciousness and a so-called ‘Turing Test’ that superintelligence might one day use on humans:

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Jun 7, 2015

“Brainprints” Could Be Future Security ID — By Christopher Intagliata Scientific American

Posted by in categories: encryption, neuroscience, security

http://www.gadgetgestures.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/555x416xBrain-Prints-Replace-Passwords.jpg.pagespeed.ic.Lhswu3zDR3.jpg

Biometric technology was once the stuff of sci-fi—how many movies show someone having their hand or eye scanned to get entry into a secured facility? But today biometric tech can be found in millions of people’s pockets—as the fingerprint scanner on an iPhone.

Of course, fingerprint scanning isn’t foolproof. Hackers have stolen fingerprints from photos, and used fake prints to fool Apple’s touch ID. Plus, there’s always the brute force method, like the time a gang in Malaysia cut off a guy’s fingertip—with a machete—to interface with the fingerprint-recognition system on the victim’s Mercedes. Read more

Jun 3, 2015

Physicist Proposes New Way To Think About Intelligence | Inside Science

Posted by in category: neuroscience

A radical concept could revise theories addressing cognitive behavior.

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Jun 1, 2015

Do we really want to fuse our brains together? — Peter Watts | AEON

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, virtual reality

http://cdn-imgs-mag.aeon.co/images/2015/05/final1-1024x641.jpg

“What are the implications of a technology that wires brains together, that in theory at least permits the existence of hive minds? In fact, you know a lot more about that than you might think. You already are a hive mind. You always have been.” Read more

May 26, 2015

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Selects 2015 Investigators

Posted by in categories: biological, biotech/medical, computing, DNA, education, genetics, life extension, neuroscience, science, scientific freedom

HHMI2015

“The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) announced today that 26 of the nation’s top biomedical researchers will become HHMI investigators and will receive the flexible support necessary to move their research in creative new directions. The initiative represents an investment in basic biomedical research of $153 million over the next five years.”

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