Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category: Page 402

Dec 1, 2016

Is BRAIN HACKING the future of war? Experts predict drone control chips, ‘neural dust’ to treat PTSD and remote weapons to disrupt soldier’s thoughts all set to become commonplace

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, neuroscience

This has been worked on since WWII using various methods that never fully worked out. However, our technology has advance; so it could be within reach this time.


An expert from Rutgers University Newark explores the proper role of neuroscience in defense and war efforts, and how technologies designed with this science can be misused to harm people.

Continue reading “Is BRAIN HACKING the future of war? Experts predict drone control chips, ‘neural dust’ to treat PTSD and remote weapons to disrupt soldier’s thoughts all set to become commonplace” »

Dec 1, 2016

Neuroscience Is a Tool of War

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, drones, government, military, neuroscience

What could once only be imagined in science fiction is now increasingly coming to fruition: Drones can be flown by human brains’ thoughts. Pharmaceuticals can help soldiers forget traumatic experiences or produce feelings of trust to encourage confession in interrogation. DARPA-funded research is working on everything from implanting brain chips to “neural dust” in an effort to alleviate the effects of traumatic experience in war. Invisible microwave beams produced by military contractors and tested on U.S. prisoners can produce the sensation of burning at a distance.

What all these techniques and technologies have in common is that they’re recent neuroscientific breakthroughs propelled by military research within a broader context of rapid neuroscientific development, driven by massive government-funded projects in both America and the European Union. Even while much about the brain remains mysterious, this research has contributed to the rapid and startling development of neuroscientific technology.

Continue reading “Neuroscience Is a Tool of War” »

Nov 30, 2016

IEEE Brain-Computer Interface Hackathon Participant Builds Mobile App to Detect Distracted Driving

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

The organization’s largest event dedicated to building BCI prototypes was held in Budapest.

30 November 2016

Read more

Nov 30, 2016

China’s Former Richest Man Turns His Mind to Neuroscience

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Wonder if Gates or Musk will do this.


Strategic investment in brain research will help Chinese enterprises push back the frontiers of scientific progress.

Read more

Nov 29, 2016

Depression Treatment

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience, wearables

The Happy Headband. Take my money.


The Fisher Wallace Stimulator® is a wearable neurostimulation device that is cleared by the FDA to treat depression and anxiety. During each 20-minute treatment session, the device gently stimulates the brain to produce serotonin and other neurochemicals that reduce depression and anxiety (and support healthy mood and sleep). The device has been proven to be safe and effective in multiple published studies conducted at top institutions such as Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital.

Continue reading “Depression Treatment” »

Nov 28, 2016

Neuroscientists Wirelessly Control the Brain of a Scampering Lab Mouse

Posted by in categories: genetics, neuroscience

With wireless optogenetic tools, neuroscientists steer mice around their cages.

Read more

Nov 28, 2016

Brain Activity Predicts the Force of Your Actions

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Summary: Researchers have discovered a link between nerve clusters in the brain and the amount of force generated by a physical action.

Source: Oxford University.

Researchers have found a link between the activity in nerve clusters in the brain and the amount of force generated in a physical action, opening the way for the development of better devices to assist paralysed patients.

Continue reading “Brain Activity Predicts the Force of Your Actions” »

Nov 28, 2016

Mystery of bleary-eyed astronauts may be cleared up with spinal fluid study

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Scientific Method —

Mystery of bleary-eyed astronauts may be cleared up with spinal fluid study.

Small study finds fluid that cushions the brain floods eye cavities in microgravity.

Continue reading “Mystery of bleary-eyed astronauts may be cleared up with spinal fluid study” »

Nov 28, 2016

Researchers may have uncovered an algorithm that explains intelligence

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, neuroscience, robotics/AI

What if a simple algorithm were all it took to program tomorrow’s artificial intelligence to think like humans?

According to a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, it may be that easy — or difficult. Are you a glass-half-full or half-empty kind of person?

Researchers behind the theory presented experimental evidence for the Theory of Connectivity — the theory that all of the brains processes are interconnected (massive oversimplification alert) — “that a simple mathematical logic underlies brain computation.” Simply put, an algorithm could map how the brain processes information. The painfully-long research paper describes groups of similar neurons forming multiple attachments meant to handle basic ideas or information. These groupings form what researchers call “functional connectivity motifs” (FCM), which are responsible for every possible combination of ideas.

Continue reading “Researchers may have uncovered an algorithm that explains intelligence” »

Nov 28, 2016

Future schools could test a student’s DNA to predict their success

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics, neuroscience

Our DNA encodes a complex biological blueprint for our lives.

Every toenail, artery, and brain cell we grow is meticulously planned and executed through our DNA’s unfathomably complex genetic instructions.

Recent genetics research has focused on how DNA may affect a person’s education, a field known as ‘educational genomics’.

Continue reading “Future schools could test a student’s DNA to predict their success” »