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Archive for the ‘information science’ category: Page 100

Aug 15, 2016

Step-by-Step Machine Learning

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

Deep Learning and Machine Learning: Get the most out of your training and scoring, and algorithms and frameworks on Intel® architecture.

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Aug 10, 2016

3 Innovative Ways we Could Soon Store The World’s Data

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, information science

While existing methods like cold, flash and cloud storage are trying to remake themselves in the age of Big Data, there are also a number of alternative methods being developed that suggest looking outside of traditional methods could be our best bet for storing and managing such unprecedented amounts of data.

Here are three methods to look out for:

We are about to witness a data storage breakthrough in which digital information could be embedded into the primary fabric of our being: the double helix of DNA. As a storage system, DNA is both compact and durable, with a single gram of DNA able to store almost a zettabyte of digital data. Now that scientists can successfully create synthetic DNA, it follows that we will be able to control what information gets stored on those strands.

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Aug 8, 2016

DARPA Autonomous Bug-Hunting Bots Don’t Need Human Hackers Anymore: Are Bots The Future Of Cybersecurity?

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, quantum physics, robotics/AI

I already voiced my concerns of this technology in the hands of criminals and terrorists. If we can have it so can others. Only when QC and a Quantum net is in place will we be truly protected with bots.


Cybersecurity could soon be another place where bots become invaluable for experts. DARPA recently organized The Cyber Grand Challenge, where computer algorithms showed how easy it is to clean up vulnerabilities in code written by humans. ( DARPA )

The Cyber Grand Challenge took place under DARPA patronage, and it is good to see how preoccupied the U.S. Department of Defense is with cybersecurity.

Continue reading “DARPA Autonomous Bug-Hunting Bots Don’t Need Human Hackers Anymore: Are Bots The Future Of Cybersecurity?” »

Aug 6, 2016

USC quantum computing researchers reduce quantum information processing errors

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Quantum computing remains mysterious and elusive to many, but USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers might have taken us one step closer to bring such super-powered devices to practical reality. The USC Viterbi School of Engineering and Information Sciences Institute is home to the USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center (QCC), a super-cooled, magnetically shielded facility specially built to house the first commercially available quantum optimization processors — devices so advanced that there are currently only two in use outside the Canadian company D-Wave Systems Inc., where they were built: The first one went to USC and Lockheed Martin, and the second to NASA and Google.

Quantum computers encode data in quantum bits, or “qubits,” which have the capability of representing the two digits of one and zero at the same time — as opposed to traditional bits, which can encode distinctly either a one or a zero. This property, called superposition, along with the ability of quantum states to “interfere” (cancel or reinforce each other like waves in a pond) and “tunnel” through energy barriers, is what may one day allow quantum processors to ultimately perform optimization calculations much faster than is possible using traditional processors. Optimization problems can take many forms, and quantum processors have been theorized to be useful for a variety of machine learning and big data problems like stock portfolio optimization, image recognition and classification, and detecting anomalies. Yet, exactly because of the exotic way in which quantum computers process information, they are highly sensitive to errors of different kinds.

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Aug 5, 2016

E-government a powerful tool to implement global sustainability goals, UN survey finds | UN News Centre

Posted by in categories: government, information science

Sustainable Development Goals_E_Final sizes

“A new United Nations report has found that e-government is an effective tool for facilitating integrated policies and public service by promoting accountable and transparent institutions, such as through open data and participatory decision-making …”

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Aug 3, 2016

Programmable ions set the stage for general-purpose quantum computers

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, particle physics, quantum physics

Quantum computers promise speedy solutions to some difficult problems, but building large-scale, general-purpose quantum devices is a problem fraught with technical challenges.

To date, many research groups have created small but functional computers. By combining a handful of atoms, electrons or superconducting junctions, researchers now regularly demonstrate quantum effects and run simple —small programs dedicated to solving particular problems.

But these laboratory devices are often hard-wired to run one program or limited to fixed patterns of interactions between the quantum constituents. Making a quantum computer that can run arbitrary algorithms requires the right kind of physical system and a suite of programming tools. Atomic , confined by fields from nearby electrodes, are among the most promising platforms for meeting these needs.

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Aug 3, 2016

Quantum Computing Just Grew Way the Hell Up

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, quantum physics

Additional insights on the latest reprogrammable QC.


Researchers implement a key piece of Shor’s algorithm in a programmable quantum computer.

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Aug 2, 2016

How computer algorithms shape our experience of the real world

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, robotics/AI, singularity

Interesting and true on many situations; and will only expand as we progress in areas of AI, QC, and Singularity as well.


The use of algorithms to filter and present information online is increasingly shaping our everyday experience of the real world, a study published by Information, Communication & Society argues.

Associate Professor Michele Willson of Curtin University, Perth, Australia looked at particular examples of computer algorithms and the questions they raise about personal agency, changing world views and our complex relationship with technologies.

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Aug 2, 2016

Big Data’s Role in 3D Printing

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, business, information science

Big Data and 3D.


3D printing remains one of those technological areas that holds a great amount of fascination. What began as a type of niche market has expanded rapidly in the past few years to encompass nearly every industry out there, from the medical field to manufacturing.

The outlook is a positive one in terms of 3D printing’s future, with Gartner predicting the amount of spending on 3D printers to exceed more than $13 billion in 2018. While 3D printing has always held a lot of promise, one of the factors truly taking the concept to the next level is big data.

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Aug 2, 2016

Quantum computing is getting closer

Posted by in categories: encryption, information science, quantum physics, supercomputing

Electronic computer technology has moved from valves to transistors to progressively more complex integrated circuits and processor designs, with each change bringing higher levels of performance. Now the advent of quantum computers promises a huge step increase in processor performance to solve certain types of problems.

Quantum computers are much faster than the world’s fastest supercomputers for some applications. In 1994 Peter Shor, an applied mathematician at Bell Laboratories, gave the encryption world a shock when he demonstrated an algorithm showing that quantum computers could threaten conventional prime number based encryption methods.

If an adversary conducts successful espionage raids on encrypted information stored in present technology computer installations, possibly through a compromised or issue-motivated individual who transfers it to portable media, it could become vulnerable to decryption by that rival’s quantum computers.

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