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Archive for the ‘food’ category: Page 7

Jul 29, 2021

Small proteins discovered to be regulators of the aging process

Posted by in categories: food, life extension

Scientists have discovered that the protein ubiquitin plays an important role in the regulation of the aging process. Ubiquitin was previously known to control processes such as signal transduction and metabolism. Prof. Dr. David Vilchez and his colleagues at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research at the University of Cologne performed a comprehensive quantitative analysis of ubiquitin signatures during aging in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a nematode worm broadly used for aging research. This method—called ubiquitin proteomics—measures all changes in ubiquitination of proteins in the cell.

The resulting data provide site-specific information and define quantitative changes in changes across all proteins in a cell during aging. A comparison with the total content of a cell (proteome) showed which changes have functional consequences in protein turnover and actual protein content during aging. The scientists thus discovered new regulators of lifespan and provide a comprehensive dataset that helps to understand aging and . The article, “Rewiring of the ubiquitinated proteome determines aging in C. elegans,” has now been published in Nature.

“Our study of ubiquitin changes led us to a number of exciting conclusions with important insights for understanding the aging process,” said Dr. Seda Koyuncu, lead author of the study. “We discovered that aging leads to changes in the ubiquitination of thousands of proteins in the cell, whereas longevity measures such as reduced food intake and reduced insulin signaling prevent these changes.” Specifically, the researchers found that aging causes a general loss of ubiquitination. This is caused by the enzymes that remove ubiquitin from proteins become more active during aging. Normally, ubiquitinated proteins are recognized and destroyed by the proteasome, the cell’s garbage truck. The scientists showed that the longevity of organisms is determined by age-related changes in the degradation of structural and regulatory proteins by the proteasome.

Jul 29, 2021

The Arctic Is Now Leaking Out High Concentrations of ‘Forever Chemicals’

Posted by in categories: chemistry, food

“The changing nature of sea ice, with earlier and erratic periods of thaw, could be altering the processing and release of pollutants alongside key nutrients, which in turn affects biota at the base of the marine food web,” says environmental chemist Crispin Halsall, from Lancaster University in the UK.


Polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are known as ‘forever chemicals’ because they don’t naturally break down in the environment. Now a new study reveals the increasing pace of Arctic ice melt is leaking more of these chemicals into the environment.

PFAS don’t originate in the Arctic, but they do settle there – they’re used in all kinds of human-made products and processes, from pizza boxes to foam used to fight fires. Once released into the atmosphere, they’re often trapped in Arctic ice floes.

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Jul 28, 2021

Flexible 32-bit microprocessor could pave the way to fully flexible smart integrated systems

Posted by in categories: computing, food

A team of researchers at ARM Inc., has developed a 32-bit microprocessor on a flexible base which the company claims could pave the way to fully flexible smart integrated systems. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how they used metal−oxide thin-film transistors along with a type of plastic to create their chip and outline ways they believe it could be used.

Microprocessors power a wide range of products, but what they all have in common is their stiffness. Almost all of them are made using , which means that they have to be hard and flat. This inability to bend, the researchers with this new effort contend, is what is preventing the development of products such as , smart labels on foods, packaging and even paper products. To meet that need, the team has created what they describe as the PlasticARM—a RISC-based 32-bit set on a flexible base. In addition to its flexibility, the new technique allows for printing a microprocessor onto many types of materials, all at low cost.

To create their bendy microprocessor, the researchers teamed with a group at PragmatIC Semiconductor to create a bendable version of the Cortex M0+ microprocessor, which was chosen for its simplicity and small size. To make their chip, (which includes ROM, RAM and interconnections) the team used fabricated (in the form of metal-oxide thin-film transistors) onto flexible polymers.

Jul 27, 2021

Scientists Develop ‘Food Generator’ That Turns Plastic Into Edible Protein

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, chemistry, food

Humanity has a plastic problem, but who said the problem couldn’t also be tasty? Scientists are trying to come up with creative solutions to address the ever-growing issue every day, with some even converting plastic bottles into vanillin using bacteria. Most recently, two scientists have echoed this sentiment and won the $1.18 million (1 million euro) 2021 Future Insight Prize in the process by creating a food ‘generator’ concept that turns plastics into protein.

The names behind the project, which was initially funded by a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) cooperative agreement award for $7.2 million over four years, are Ting Lu, a professor of bioengineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and Stephen Techtmann, associate professor of biological sciences at Michigan Technological University.

Their goal was to improve a process for converting plastic trash into protein powder and lubricants using a combination of chemicals and high heat (pyrolysis). The two scientists call their project a food ‘generator.’

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Jul 26, 2021

Lisa Gable — Chief Executive Officer — Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, food, government, health, policy

Improving Quality Of Life & Health, For Hundreds Of Millions Globally, Suffering Food Allergies & Intolerances — Lisa Gable, Chief Executive Officer, Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)


Lisa Gable is the Chief Executive Officer, of Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE — https://www.foodallergy.org), an organization with a mission to improve the quality of life and the health of 85 million Americans with food allergies and food intolerances, including 32 million of those are at risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis, and to provide them hope through the promise of new treatments. To date FARE has turned over $100 million in donor gifts into ground-breaking research and has provided a voice for the community, advocating on its behalf and offering hope for a better tomorrow.

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Jul 23, 2021

Da Vinci DC100, a self-balancing electric motorcycle that will follow you around

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI

Beijing’s Da Vinci Dynamics has launched its DC100, a high-performance electric streetbike with an impressive 250-mile (400 km) NEDC range, and some wacky “robotic” tricks, including the alleged ability to self-balance and follow you around.

We’ve got ourselves a bit of a kitchen sinker here; Da Vinci has thrown all sorts of features at this one. But even some of the basic specs are a tad elusive. For starters, while it makes a peak of 135 horsepower, putting it very much in the “fast electric” category, the company says it runs “a smart control system that seamlessly integrates multiple different motors.” Who the what now? Multiple motors? A separate press release then states it’s actually 137 horsepower, running through a hub motor.

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Jul 23, 2021

Scientists made this rat fearless

Posted by in categories: food, genetics, neuroscience, robotics/AI

Neuroscientists removed fear from rats by inactivating amygdala — brain region mediating fear.

#Neuroscience #Brain #YuriNeuro #Neurobiology #Amygdala.

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Jul 23, 2021

Nature has learnt how to eat our plastic!

Posted by in categories: food, genetics, neuroscience, sustainability

Nature always finds a way…so they say! But it looks like it may actually be true in the case of our global plastic waste dilemma. Genetic mutations have been discovered in specific natural bacteria that enable them to break the polymer chains of certain plastics. Where have we found these bacteria? Well…in plastic recycling dumps of course. So, gloves and masks on everyone. We’re going in!

Video Transcripts available at our website.
http://www.justhaveathink.com.

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Jul 22, 2021

RNA breakthrough creates crops that can grow 50% more potatoes, rice

Posted by in categories: food, innovation

Manipulating RNA can allow plants to yield dramatically more crops, as well as increasing drought tolerance, announced a group of scientists from the University of Chicago, Peking University and Guizhou University.

In initial tests, adding a gene encoding for a protein called FTO to both rice and increased their yield by 50% in . The grew significantly larger, produced longer root systems and were better able to tolerate drought stress. Analysis also showed that the plants had increased their rate of photosynthesis.

“The change really is dramatic,” said University of Chicago Prof. Chuan He, who together with Prof. Guifang Jia at Peking University, led the research. “What’s more, it worked with almost every type of plant we tried it with so far, and it’s a very simple modification to make.”

Jul 22, 2021

Flexible computer processor is the most powerful plastic chip yet

Posted by in categories: computing, food, internet

Flexible computer processors have circuits printed onto plastic film.

PragmatIC

Could a flexible processor stuck on your produce track the freshness of your cantaloupe? That’s the idea behind the latest processor from UK computer chip designer Arm, which says such a device could be manufactured for pennies by printing circuits directly onto paper, cardboard or cloth. The technology could give trillions of everyday items such as clothes and food containers the ability to collect, process and transmit data across the internet – something that could be as convenient for retailers as it is concerning for privacy advocates.

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