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Archive for the ‘education’ category: Page 69

Aug 20, 2017

The Vertical Farm

Posted by in categories: education, food, sustainability

The term “vertical farming” has not been around long. It refers to a method of growing crops, usually without soil or natural light, in beds stacked vertically inside a controlled-environment building. The credit for coining the term seems to belong to Dickson D. Despommier, Ph.D., a professor (now emeritus) of parasitology and environmental science at Columbia University Medical School and the author of “The Vertical Farm: Feeding the World in the 21st Century.”

Hearing that Despommier would be addressing an audience of high-school science teachers at Columbia on a recent morning, I arranged to sit in. During the question period, one of the teachers asked a basic question that had also been puzzling me: What are the plants in a soil-free farm made of? Aren’t plants mostly the soil that they grew in? Despommier explained that plants consist of water, mineral nutrients like potassium and magnesium taken from the soil (or, in the case of a vertical farm, from the nutrients added to the water their roots are sprayed with), and carbon, an element plants get from the CO2 in the air and then convert by photosynthesis into sucrose, which feeds the plant, and cellulose, which provides its structure.

In other words, plants create themselves partly out of thin air. Salad greens are about ninety per cent water. About half of the remaining ten per cent is carbon. If AeroFarms’ vertical farm grows a thousand tons of greens a year, about fifty tons of that will be carbon taken from the air.

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Aug 15, 2017

NYC is getting a huge new VR conference this fall

Posted by in categories: education, health, virtual reality

In addition to an upcoming virtual reality hub at NYU, New York City will also host its first VR-focused convention later this year. The NYVR Expo, which will take place at the Javits Center from Oct. 26th through 28th, aims to be the biggest virtual reality conference on the East Coast. It’ll be a place for both newcomers and existing VR professionals to explore what’s next in the burgeoning medium. And since the NYVR Expo will run alongside the PhotoPlus Expo at Javits, it will have easy reach to a wide audience of media enthusiasts.

According to Emerald Expositions, which organizes both shows, the new event came about after it noticed that PhotoPlus Expo attendees were increasingly interested in VR. While it considered creating a small virtual reality pavilion as part of the existing show, according to Senior Vice President John McGeary, the company realized it made more sense to start a completely new conference. Together, both the NYVR Expo and PhotoPlus Expo are expected to gather around 20,000 attendees.

As you’d expect, the virtual reality conference will show off how the technology can be used in a variety of sectors, including health care, education and entertainment. It’ll also take advantage of NYC’s unique position as a melting pot for a variety of industries.

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Aug 15, 2017

Welcome to the Future of Work

Posted by in categories: education, futurism

The Associated Press is launching a series of stories called Future of Work that explore how workplaces across the U.S. and the world are being transformed by technology and global pressures. As more employers move, shrink or revamp their work sites, many employees are struggling to adapt. At the same time, workers with in-demand skills or knowledge are benefiting. Advanced training, education or know-how is becoming a required ticket to the 21st-century workplace.

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Aug 10, 2017

Futurist Gray Scott: We Can’t Ignore Our Psychological Future

Posted by in categories: computing, disruptive technology, education, ethics, futurism, innovation, internet, media & arts, mobile phones, nanotechnology, philosophy, robotics/AI, software, transhumanism, virtual reality

Why are we often so wrong about how the future and future technology will reshape society and our personal lives? In this new video from the Galactic Public Archives, Futurist Gray Scott tells us why he thinks it is important to look at all aspects of the future.

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Aug 10, 2017

Thousands march for science across India

Posted by in categories: education, science

Among the demands of Wednesday’s rallies was the allocation at least three percent of the GDP to scientific and technological research and 10 percent towards education, a statement by the march organisers said.


People across 25 cities join scientists in demanding more funding for research and promotion of scientific temper.

Laurin-Whitney Gottbrath 09 Aug 2017 20:19 GMT Asia, India, Science, Science & Technology.

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Aug 9, 2017

String Theory’s Weirdest Ideas Finally Make Sense—Thanks to VR

Posted by in categories: business, education, quantum physics, robotics/AI, space, virtual reality

The robot is building a tesseract. He motions at a glowing cube floating before him, and an identical cube emerges. He drags it to the left, but the two cubes stay connected, strung together by glowing lines radiating from their corners. The robot lowers its hands, and the cubes coalesce into a single shape—with 24 square faces, 16 vertices, and eight connected cubes existing in four dimensions. A tesseract.

This isn’t a video game. It’s a classroom. And the robot is Brian Greene, a physicist at Columbia University and bestselling author of several popular science books. His robot avatar teaches a semicircle of student robots, each wearing a shoulder badge of their home country’s flag. The classroom is outer space: Greene and the arc of student-robots orbit Earth. After he shows the students the tesseract, Greene directs his class to try making four, five, even six dimension objects. This is a virtual reality course on string theory; the lesson happens to be about objects with more than three dimensions.

In real life, Greene is wearing a dark blue shirt, black jeans, and boots, and his normal, non-hovering chair is sitting in a concrete-floored VR business called Step Into the Light planted firmly on Earth’s surface—Manhattan’s Lower East Side. An HTC Vive headset covers his face, and he gestures effusively—he’s a New York native—with the controllers.

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Aug 2, 2017

We Should Be Optimistic But Not Complacent About Progress

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, life extension

In the last year or so we have seen remarkable progress with a number of interventions that target the aging processes to prevent and treat age-related diseases.

Senescent cell clearance has enjoyed lots of media attention and is entering human clinical trials later this year with Unity Biotechnology. We have LysoClear from Ichor Therapeutics moving towards the clinic with a therapy based on the LysoSENS approach advocated for by the SENS Research Foundation, which seeks to treat age-related blindness caused by the accumulation of waste products in the retina cells of patients. Dr. David Sinclair is moving into human trials this year with a therapy aimed at repairing DNA damage, one of the main reasons we are thought to age.

We have had amazing progress in immunotherapy, where the immune system is taught to detect cancer and other diseases far more efficiently. For instance, immunotherapy has been used to allow the immune system spot cancer that uses the same “Do not eat me” signals that healthy cells use to avoid destruction.

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Jul 29, 2017

How DIY biohacking will change society

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, education, genetics

Imagine a scientist experimenting on her own genes from her kitchen, rather than going to a physician, because she wants to cure a medical ailment. Another “do-it-yourself” scientist across the country extracts DNA samples from plants to figure out how they affect its growth.

DIY biohacking is a relatively new phenomenon in which scientists (typically those with an interest in genetic engineering) want to take biology experimentation outside of the lab or classroom. Currently, it’s mostly used for medical purposes, but the future of DIY biohacking could look a lot different. So we asked four experts a simple question: By the year 2040, what will be the gene most edited via DIY biohacking?

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Jun 25, 2017

The Four Immortality Stories We Tell Ourselves

Posted by in categories: education, life extension, neuroscience

Since the moment humans became aware of their existence, they have been haunted by the knowledge that it will inevitably come to an end and the hope to change this unfortunate fate.

This month, during Brain Bar Budapest – Europe’s leading conference on the future – Stephen Cave talked about the four immortality stories we tell ourselves and how they are changing in the context of new scientific discoveries and technological advancements. Stephen Cave spent a decade studying and teaching philosophy, and was awarded his PhD in metaphysics from the University of Cambridge in 2001. He is Executive Director of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence and Senior Research Associate at the University of Cambridge.

Stephen Cave

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Jun 15, 2017

Watch as Cannabis(THC) Kills Cancer Cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education

Cancer…your days are numbered!!!

Here’s why there has never been a human clinical trial conducted on the Cancer-Killing power of Cannabis: IT WORKS! Watch cannabis documentary episode on “Treating Cancer.” http://bit.ly/2r98jhU

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