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Nov 20, 2017

The Policy Prognosis for AI: Winner of the SSUNS 2017 Essay Contest

Posted by in categories: economics, education, Elon Musk, employment, health, neuroscience, policy, quantum physics, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Furthermore, with advancements in quantum computing and machine learning, many notable public figures, including Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have indicated a growing concern with the imminent threat of AI surpassing human intelligence (Gosset, 2017). For instance, Darrell M. West, a political scientist, has proposed a protectionist framework that appeals to transhumanism, in which he restructures socioeconomic policy to account for changes in technology-induced unemployment. In particular, he posits that “Separating the dispersion of health care, disability, and pension benefits outside of employment offers workers with limited skills social benefits on a universal basis” (West, 2015). Expounding upon this equivocation, a more viable solution to potential unemployment is the realization of a multi-faceted policy which advocates the improvement of STEM-related education on a broad economic base, with habituation programs for the unskilled workforce. That is, with the implementation of appropriate and reformatory policies concerning the future development of AI technologies, this sector provides an economic incentive for new job creation, compatible with industrial development.


Prompt: What are the political implications of artificial intelligence technology and how should policy makers ensure this technology will benefit diverse sectors of society?

In recent years, the rapid development and mass proliferation of artificial intelligence have had various sociopolitical implications. It is a commonly held belief that the emergence of this technology will have an unprecedented impact on policies and political agendas. However, such discourse often lacks a geopolitical and social dimension, which limits the breadth of analysis. Further, little consideration has been given to potential employment and public policy reform. Growing concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk inherent in the evolution of strong AI, which provides the basis for transhumanism, whereby it is conjectured that AI will eventually be able to surpass human intelligence. As such, it is incumbent upon the upcoming generation of policymakers to implement and adopt necessary measures, which will provide a careful, multilateral framework, ultimately achieving market-oriented technological advancement with respect to employment and public policy.

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Nov 18, 2017

Transforming Education through Imagination — even for Tech Execs

Posted by in categories: architecture, education, environmental, human trajectories

Why do Silicon Valley technology executives send their children to an almost tech-free school? Several authors have explored this question, including New York University professor Adam Alter. In his book “Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked” Alter explores the case of a San Francisco Steiner-Waldorf school where 75% of students are the children of Silicon Valley tech execs. How ironic.

In this piece I propose some additional reasons why imaginative education is becoming an approach of choice for parents wanting their children to become innovative, ecologically aware and even, as Whitehead suggests, to develop genius.

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Nov 16, 2017

What’s new, Atlas?

Posted by in categories: education, finance, robotics/AI

They taught ATLAS Kung Fu 😮

Really impressive, only things that need to be worked on. Shrink the Torso A Lot, so it’s comparable to a person. And, someone is going to have finance coming up with a set of robotic human like hands.

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Oct 20, 2017

PBS’s Documentary ‘The Gene Doctors’ Arrives Amid A Gene Therapy Boom

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education

A new PBS film educates viewers about gene therapy at a time when the once controversial field of research is starting to bear fruit.

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Oct 16, 2017

Game on! Police play Gran Turismo Sport to improve driving skills

Posted by in categories: education, virtual reality

The four drivers received specialist training, including a new virtual reality mode…


Lincolnshire police officers have been receiving extra lessons in high-speed car chases — by playing a video game.

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Oct 12, 2017

Contrasting Human Futures: Technotopian or Human-Centred?*

Posted by in categories: complex systems, cyborgs, education, homo sapiens, human trajectories, philosophy, posthumanism, robotics/AI, singularity, Singularity University, transhumanism

[*This article was first published in the September 2017 issue of Paradigm Explorer: The Journal of the Scientific and Medical Network (Established 1973). The article was drawn from the author’s original work in her book: The Future: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2017), especially from Chapters 4 & 5.]

We are at a critical point today in research into human futures. Two divergent streams show up in the human futures conversations. Which direction we choose will also decide the fate of earth futures in the sense of Earth’s dual role as home for humans, and habitat for life. I choose to deliberately oversimplify here to make a vital point.

The two approaches I discuss here are informed by Oliver Markley and Willis Harman’s two contrasting future images of human development: ‘evolutionary transformational’ and ‘technological extrapolationist’ in Changing Images of Man (Markley & Harman, 1982). This has historical precedents in two types of utopian human futures distinguished by Fred Polak in The Image of the Future (Polak, 1973) and C. P. Snow’s ‘Two Cultures’ (the humanities and the sciences) (Snow, 1959).

What I call ‘human-centred futures’ is humanitarian, philosophical, and ecological. It is based on a view of humans as kind, fair, consciously evolving, peaceful agents of change with a responsibility to maintain the ecological balance between humans, Earth, and cosmos. This is an active path of conscious evolution involving ongoing psychological, socio-cultural, aesthetic, and spiritual development, and a commitment to the betterment of earthly conditions for all humanity through education, cultural diversity, greater economic and resource parity, and respect for future generations.

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Sep 30, 2017

Germany Is Now Offering Free Tuition To All Canadian Students

Posted by in category: education

Das ist great news!

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Sep 30, 2017

This new app brings 3D body parts into your living room

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, education, health

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Sep 27, 2017

Investors should wake up to Japan’s robotic future

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, habitats, robotics/AI

Out of necessity, Japan has been pushing on the robotics frontier for years. As a result, the proliferation and embrace of robots goes well beyond the Japanese factory floor to include schools, hospitals, nursing homes, airports, train stations and even temples.


Unfavourable demographics are spurring innovation — and investment opportunities.

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Sep 24, 2017

Letting teens sleep in would save the country roughly $9 billion a year

Posted by in categories: economics, education, policy

The United States would realize roughly $9 billion a year in economic gains by instituting a simple, nationwide policy change: starting public school classes no earlier than 8:30 a.m.

That’s according to an exhaustive new study by the Rand Corporation, the first of its kind to model the nationwide costs and benefits of later school start times.

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