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Archive for the ‘economics’ category: Page 5

Mar 20, 2019

Op-ed

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, economics, government, space

The last two decades have seen a great upswing in commercial space endeavors with hundreds of new companies formed and a few prominent billionaires entering the fray. This is all good, but it remains devilishly hard to make money in space without tapping into government space markets. Nevertheless, I’m a firm believer that the commercialization of space is absolutely essential for the growth of the space economy and achieving all of the goals we espouse for human activities in space.

So, what do I mean by commercial space? This has been a great topic of debate ever since NASA initiated the commercial cargo and commercial crew programs. There are many definitions and which is appropriate depends on the context. The real distinction is between the public sector and the private sector. Any given space activity can include a mixture of both elements. The purest form of commercial activity takes place entirely within the private sector. It is performed by private-sector companies for the benefit of private-sector customers using private-sector capital. Something like Direct TV would be an example.

At the other end of the spectrum is a pure public-sector activity where the activity is performed entirely by public-sector agencies using public-sector employees, entirely funded by public funds for a public purpose. An example would be SLS, but even it is not purely public as several private sector companies are employed. In between are all manner of hybrids involving a mix of investment funds, executing entities and customers.

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Mar 16, 2019

Changing Newark requires bold ideas. Mayor proposes guaranteed income for all

Posted by in category: economics

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka speaks during his fifth state of the city address at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center on March 12, 2019. (Karen Yi | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com)

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Mar 14, 2019

Why modern enterprises need to adopt cognitive computing for faster business growth in a digital economy

Posted by in categories: business, economics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Cognitive computing (CC) technology revolves around making computers adept at mimicking the processes of the human brain, which is basically making them more intelligent. Even though the phrase cognitive computing is used synonymously with AI, the term is closely associated with IBM’s cognitive computer system, Watson. IBM Watson is a supercomputer that leverages AI-based disruptive technologies like machine learning (ML), real-time analysis, natural language processing, etc. to augment decision making and deliver superior outcomes.

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Mar 14, 2019

What If Google and the Government Merged?

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, finance, government, sustainability

My colleague Conor Sen recently made a bold prediction: Government will be the driver of the U.S. economy in coming decades. The era of Silicon Valley will end, supplanted by the imperatives of fighting climate change and competing with China.

This would be a momentous change. The biggest tech companies — Amazon.com, Apple Inc., Facebook Inc., Google (Alphabet Inc.) and (a bit surprisingly) Microsoft Corp. — have increasingly dominated both the headlines and the U.S. stock market:

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Mar 11, 2019

SpaceX and ULA Get Launch Contracts. ULA Wins Almost 50% More Money

Posted by in categories: economics, space travel

That may not be fair to SpaceX, but it’s a good deal for taxpayers.

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Mar 11, 2019

China Poised to Overtake US Economy in 2020

Posted by in category: economics

Explosive growth in emerging economies will help developing nations exceed America’s economic growth.

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Mar 9, 2019

Waking Up with Sam Harris

Posted by in categories: economics, governance, information science, robotics/AI

James Hughes : “Great convo with Yuval Harari, touching on algorithmic governance, the perils of being a big thinker when democracy is under attack, the need for transnational governance, the threats of automation to the developing world, the practical details of UBI, and a lot more.”


In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Yuval Noah Harari about his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. They discuss the importance of meditation for his intellectual life, the primacy of stories, the need to revise our fundamental assumptions about human civilization, the threats to liberal democracy, a world without work, universal basic income, the virtues of nationalism, the implications of AI and automation, and other topics.

Yuval Noah Harari has a PhD in History from the University of Oxford and lectures at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, specializing in world history. His books have been translated into 50+ languages, with 12+ million copies sold worldwide. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind looked deep into our past, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow considered far-future scenarios, and 21 Lessons for the 21st Century focuses on the biggest questions of the present moment.

Twitter: @harari_yuval

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Mar 3, 2019

Get paid for your data? California governor wants tech companies to show you the money

Posted by in category: economics

Gov. Gavin Newsom is considering a bill that would compensate users for their data, but critics warn it could be complicated.

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Feb 28, 2019

China’s Get-Rich Space Program

Posted by in categories: economics, space

Unlike other nations, China’s space ambitions are centered on wealth creation through a space-based economy.

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Feb 27, 2019

Are Robots Competing for Your Job?

Posted by in categories: economics, employment, food, robotics/AI, sustainability

This thesis has been rolling around like a marble in the bowl of a lot of people’s brains for a while now, and many of those marbles were handed out by Martin Ford, in his 2015 book, “Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future.” In the book, and in an essay in “Confronting Dystopia: The New Technological Revolution and the Future of Work” (Cornell), Ford acknowledges that all other earlier robot-invasion panics were unfounded. In the nineteenth century, people who worked on farms lost their jobs when agricultural processes were mechanized, but they eventually earned more money working in factories. In the twentieth century, automation of industrial production led to warnings about “unprecedented economic and social disorder.” Instead, displaced factory workers moved into service jobs. Machines eliminate jobs; rising productivity creates new jobs.


Probably, but don’t count yourself out.

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