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Archive for the ‘economics’ category: Page 7

Oct 15, 2019

The Transhuman Condition of “FOMO” — The Fear of Missing Out

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, transhumanism

As noted by Dan Ariely, who is a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, this “worry that tugs at the corners of our minds is set off by the fear of regret…that we’ve made the wrong decision about how to spend our time.”

Why do such fears rule our day? Perhaps due to the fact that our lives are severely limited, and thus our experiences are confined by an hourglass. Would we reminisce of our past decisions so often if life weren’t so short?


FOMO — the Fear of Missing Out — has been an anxiety of ours since birth. Will our future endeavors provide us a cure or will we continue living and expiring with this constant psychological state?

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Oct 13, 2019

Economist who slated colleagues’ work is tipped for Nobel

Posted by in category: economics

Ariel Rubinstein, who says economics lacks common sense, heads list of likely winners.

Oct 12, 2019

America’s CFOs are bracing for a recession. They think it will strike before the 2020 election

Posted by in categories: business, economics, finance

America’s top finance chiefs are on high alert for a recession. For the first time in several years, economic uncertainty is now their lead concern, replacing worries about the difficulty of hiring and retaining talented workers.

Fifty-three percent of chief financial officers expect the United States to enter a recession prior to the 2020 presidential election, according to the Duke University/CFO Global Business Outlook survey released on Wednesday. And two-thirds predict a downturn by the end of next year.

Oct 9, 2019

Financial services sector needs rewiring as digital assets gain greater institutional acceptance

Posted by in categories: economics, finance

Digital assets will only continue to grow. With clearer regulation coming in the near future, large financial institutions such as banks and asset managers will have the official ‘stamp of approval’ needed to participate in the market, driving tokenisation of existing asset classes and substantial capital inflows to the sector.


How investment in safekeeping technology will help determine the winners in Asia’s new token economy.

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Oct 4, 2019

Robots Are Catching Up to Humans in the Jobs Race

Posted by in categories: economics, employment, robotics/AI

Trade wars and a global economic slowdown are creating more opportunities for companies looking for better, cheaper automated options.

Oct 2, 2019

The Bio-Belt: Growing The Future In Rural America

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, education, employment, sustainability

Despite this economic pressure, rural America remains one of our nation’s most fertile regions, and recent advances in biotechnology are making it easier than ever to sustainably grow new kinds of valuable goods, from biopharmaceuticals to biomaterials. With the right strategic investments, rural America could see a biotech “bloom.”

I propose a Bio-Belt stretching through middle America to bring new skills and high-paying jobs to communities that desperately need them. This initiative would bolster investment in biotechnology training, education, infrastructure and entrepreneurship in rural areas in order to develop new, sustainable sources of income.

The Bio-Belt is about much more than biofuel. Fermentation is an increasingly powerful force for converting sugar and other forms of biomass into value-added goods—all through the rational design of cells that can be sustainably grown wherever land is abundant.

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Oct 2, 2019

‘The next era of human progress’: what lies behind the global new cities epidemic?

Posted by in categories: business, economics, energy, government, sustainability, transportation

This new breed of city takes various different forms, from government initiatives, to public-private partnerships, to entirely private enterprises. Many are being used to jump-start economies in the developing world, with masterplans carefully calibrated to attract foreign investors and treasuries looking to sink their funds into something concrete. They provide a powerful means for wealthy countries to expand their strategic influence abroad, with the construction of new cities acting as a form of “debt-trap diplomacy”, tying host nations into impossibly burdensome deals. They are billed as a panacea for the world’s urban ills, solving overcrowding, congestion and pollution; yet, more often than not, they turn out to be catalysts for land dispossession, environmental degradation and social inequality.


The feature Kim enjoys most is a small touchscreen display on his kitchen wall that allows him to keep track of his and his wife’s consumption of electricity, water and gas and, most important, compare it against the average statistics for the building. Flicking between the screens of bar charts and graphs, a broad grin spreads across his face: for yet another day running, they are more energy-efficient than all their neighbours.

From their living room window at the top of one of the city’s new residential towers, a panorama of downtown Songdo unfolds. Across an eight-lane highway lies Central Park, a broad swath of trees surrounding an ornamental lake, flanked by rows of glass towers with vaguely jaunty silhouettes. Armies of identikit concrete apartment blocks march into the hazy distance beyond, terminating at a Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course. It looks a lot like many other modern Asian cities, a place of generic towers rising above a car-dominated grid. Public life is mostly confined to the air-conditioned environments of malls and private leisure clubs.

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Oct 1, 2019

Here’s how blockchain could stop corrupt officials from stealing school lunches

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, computing, economics, governance, security

The World Economic Forum has partnered with the Inter-American Development Bank and the Colombian Inspector General’s Office to explore how distributed ledger technology can improve public transparency and integrity in school meal procurement.

The project, which is taking place this year, is multi-faceted and includes a software implementation with blockchain technology for the selection of school food vendors. It is co-designed with several partners from academia, the IT industry, and the non-profit world, including economists and computer scientists from the blockchain economics and governance consulting firm Prysm Group, the National University of Colombia, U.C. Berkeley, and the blockchain security firm Quantstamp.

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Sep 27, 2019

Nobel laureates join call for European Commission to reinstate top science post

Posted by in categories: economics, education, physics, science

More than 9000 scientists, including Andre Geim, Carlo Rubbia and eight other Nobel-prize-winning physicists, have signed a letter calling on the European Commission (EC) to reinstate a dedicated commissioner for education and research. The letter claims that that an out-and-out role for education and research is necessary to create a sound basis for innovation in Europe.

News of the apparent sidelining of science emerged when Ursula von der Leyen, the EC’s president-elect, presented her team and the new structure of the next European Commission on 10 September. It included her candidates for the new set of 18 commissioners, but the plan no longer included a commissioner that explicitly represents education and research.

These areas are instead expected to be covered by the commissioner for innovation and youth – the nominee for which is Mariya Gabriel, who is the current commissioner for digital economy and society. In the new set-up, the innovation and youth role appears to be a merger between the current directorate for research, science and innovation with that for education, culture, youth and sport.

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Sep 21, 2019

The quantum revolution is coming, and Chinese scientists are at the forefront

Posted by in categories: economics, military, quantum physics

A Shanghai conference reveals the extent of the Chinese research commitment to a field with big economic and military applications.

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