Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘economics’ category: Page 8

Jul 25, 2020

UAE Mars mission: extraordinary feat shows how space exploration can benefit small nations

Posted by in categories: business, economics, space travel

The nation has also generated significant additional value in logistics by creating new manufacturing capacities and know-how. There are already multiple businesses outside the realm of the space industry that have benefited from knowledge transfer. These are all typical impacts of a space mission.

But while that is where most studies of the value of space missions stop looking for impact, for the UAE this would miss a huge part of the picture. Ultimately, its Mars mission has generated transformative value in building capacity for a fundamentally different future national economy – one with a much stronger role for science and innovation.

Through a broad portfolio of programmes and initiatives, in just a few years the Hope mission has boosted the number of students enrolling in science degrees and helped create new graduate science degree pathways. It has also opened up new sources of funding for research and made science an attractive career.

Continue reading “UAE Mars mission: extraordinary feat shows how space exploration can benefit small nations” »

Jul 24, 2020

Pivot to ‘green’: Russian gas & nuclear energy giants Gazprom and Rosatom to start producing ‘clean’ hydrogen

Posted by in categories: economics, government, nuclear energy

With much of the world planning to pivot away from oil and gas in the near future, the country’s government is looking ahead to a more diversified energy sector. The international ‘green’ trend is a significant threat to the Russian economy, which is at present largely dependent on the export of oil, gas, and coal. Starting from 2021, the government intends to build on the country’s reputation as a hydrogen supplier, aiming to make exports of the world’s most abundant gas a large part of its energy sector.

Jul 24, 2020

World population projected to reach 9.8 billion in 2050, and 11.2 billion in 2100

Posted by in categories: economics, sustainability

The current world population of 7.6 billion is expected to reach 8.6 billion in 2030, 9.8 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion in 2100, according to a new United Nations report being launched today. With roughly 83 million people being added to the world’s population every year, the upward trend in population size is expected to continue, even assuming that fertility levels will continue to decline.

The World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision, published by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, provides a comprehensive review of global demographic trends and prospects for the future. The information is essential to guide policies aimed at achieving the new Sustainable Development Goals.

Jul 20, 2020

AstraZeneca slides even as the company’s coronavirus vaccine trial results show ‘promise’

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics

AstraZeneca shares fell on Monday even after the publication of positive results from a trial of its experimental COVID-19 vaccine developed in partnership with Oxford University.

The study, published in The Lancet on Monday, said healthy volunteers who received the experimental vaccine, called AZD1222, showed immune responses.


Read more:A $47 billion fund manager shares 3 trades she’s making for huge upside as the economy recovers — including a play on the Tesla-led boom of electric vehicles

Continue reading “AstraZeneca slides even as the company’s coronavirus vaccine trial results show ‘promise’” »

Jul 19, 2020

Bank of Canada exploring digital currency that would replace cash, track how people spend money

Posted by in categories: cryptocurrencies, economics

The Bank of Canada is considering launching a digital currency that would help it combat the “direct threat” of cryptocurrencies and collect more information on how people spend their money, The Logic has learned.

An internal Bank of Canada presentation, prepared for Governor Stephen Poloz and the bank’s board of directors, offers the most detailed public insight yet into the bank’s thinking on a proprietary digital coin. According to the presentation, the currency would be widely available. It would initially coexist with coins and paper money, eventually replacing them completely.

Jul 19, 2020

Why Underinvesting in Innovation is Riskier Than Ever

Posted by in categories: economics, health

Corporate boards have been debating the need to invest in innovation as a driver of future growth for the better part of a decade.

And while many enterprises have demonstrated an organizational commitment to innovation through standing up dedicated teams, allocating budget, and developing bets for the future, innovation leaders now face a sizable challenge. As the world grapples with the current public health crisis and its long-tail impacts on society and the economy, many CEOs and their boards of directors are looking for reasons not to invest in innovation.

Ali Geramian

Continue reading “Why Underinvesting in Innovation is Riskier Than Ever” »

Jul 15, 2020

World population expected to peak by 2064

Posted by in category: economics

A new study, published this week in The Lancet, concludes that the global population is likely to peak in 2064 at 9.7 billion and fall to 8.8 billion by century’s end. The report foresees major shifts in geopolitical power – producing a more multi-polar world – with 23 countries seeing their populations shrink by more than half as a result of declining fertility rates. Liberal immigration policies could help to maintain population sizes and economic growth, the authors suggest.

Jul 14, 2020

The Ideological Corruption of Science (Lawrence Krauss in the Wall Street Journal)

Posted by in categories: economics, genetics, science, sex

Theoretical Physicist Lawrence Krauss writes in the Wall Street Journal.

WSJ: In the 1980s, when I was a young professor of physics and astronomy at Yale, deconstructionism was in vogue in the English Department. We in the science departments would scoff at the lack of objective intellectual standards in the humanities, epitomized by a movement that argued against the existence of objective truth itself, arguing that all such claims to knowledge were tainted by ideological biases due to race, sex or economic dominance.

It could never happen in the hard sciences, except perhaps under dictatorships, such as the Nazi condemnation of “Jewish” science, or the Stalinist campaign against genetics led by Trofim Lysenko, in which literally thousands of mainstream geneticists were dismissed in the effort to suppress any opposition to the prevailing political view of the state.

Jul 13, 2020

The Pandemic Has Accelerated Demands for a More Skilled Work Force

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, employment, robotics/AI

In the coronavirus economy, companies are adopting more automation, as they seek to cut costs and increase efficiency. There is debate about which jobs are most at risk and how soon. But climbing up the skills ladder is the best way to stay ahead of the automation wave.


Even groups that regularly disagree on labor issues said there should be significant public investment in programs that can upgrade the skills of American workers.

Jul 12, 2020

The Booming Space Economy

Posted by in categories: economics, finance, life extension

The current market is expected to balloon to $1.0-$1.5 trillion in the next 20 years. Not even the anti-aging industry is worth that much!


The next decade is going to be an important one, with declining costs & advanced technology propelling the space economy to new highs. We have never been closer to the final frontier.

Continue reading “The Booming Space Economy” »

Page 8 of 139First56789101112Last