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Archive for the ‘biological’ category: Page 6

Jan 10, 2020

Ms. Nemonte Nenquimo, President of the Waorani Pastaza Organization, CONCONAWEP, following their recent landmark legal victory against the Ecuadorian government, leading to 500,000 acres of Amazon rainforest protected from oil drilling and timber companies — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: bees, biological, climatology, environmental, food, geography, geopolitics, health, life extension, science

Jan 9, 2020

Pathways that extend lifespan by 500 percent identified

Posted by in categories: biological, genetics, life extension

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.

The increase in lifespan would be the equivalent of a human living for 400 or 500 years, according to one of the scientists.

The research draws on the discovery of two major pathways governing aging in C. elegans, which is a popular model in aging research because it shares many of its genes with humans and because its short lifespan of only three to four weeks allows scientists to quickly assess the effects of genetic and environmental interventions to extend healthy lifespan.

Jan 9, 2020

Restoring the Ability to Repair and Regenerate As We Age

Posted by in category: biological

“If everything regenerated, there would be no death.” Richard J. Goss, Ph.D.Principles of Regeneration Richard J. Goss, Ph.D., author of Principles of Regeneration, was a visiting scientist at the MDI Biological Laboratory in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. But is the statement that there would be no death if everything regenerated correct? The zebrafish,…

Jan 9, 2020

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

Posted by in category: biological

“The team used an advanced imaging technology called “zero-mode waveguide single-molecule fluorescence microscopy,” which they have adapted in recent years for real-time tracking of RNAs and proteins. Ribosomes are made of both RNA and proteins, reflecting a molecular partnership that is widely believed to go back nearly to the dawn of life on Earth.

In a proof-of-principle study published last year, the researchers used their approach to record an early, brief and relatively well-studied stage of ribosome assembly from the bacterium E. coli. This involved the transcription, or copying out from its corresponding gene, of a ribosomal RNA, and initial interactions of this RNA strand with a ribosomal protein.

In the new study, the team extended this approach by tracking not only the transcription of a ribosomal RNA but also its real-time folding. The work provided a detailed look at a complex, and until-now mysterious, part of E. coli ribosome assembly — the formation of an entire major component, or domain, of the E. coli ribosome, with assistance from eight protein partners that end up incorporated into the structure.”


The achievement, reported in Cell, reveals in unprecedented detail how strands of ribonucleic acid (RNA), cellular molecules that are inherently sticky and prone to misfold, are “chaperoned” by ribosomal proteins into folding properly and forming one of the main components of ribosomes.

Continue reading “In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time” »

Jan 9, 2020

Biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan

Posted by in categories: biological, genetics, life extension

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research.

The increase in would be the equivalent of a human living for 400 or 500 years, according to one of the scientists.

The research draws on the discovery of two major pathways governing aging in C. elegans, which is a popular model in aging research because it shares many of its genes with humans and because its short lifespan of only three to four weeks allows scientists to quickly assess the effects of genetic and environmental interventions to extend healthy lifespan.

Jan 8, 2020

Carboncopies: Here’s a weblink to the research paper:

Posted by in categories: biological, cyborgs, robotics/AI

Your brain is the orchestra that plays the symphony of your mental experience and your awareness, and that experience is your window on existence and on the universe. Our aim is to preserve, restore, and even improve your mental experience beyond the limits of biology. With dedication, scientific advances within our lifetimes may allow us to record the unique arrangement and responses of neurons and synapses that encode your memories, their active behavior, and ultimately to restore all of that in a neural prosthesis that seamlessly repairs a brain function, or a complete artificial brain. Some of this is still reminiscent of science fiction, but each challenge is well on its way to being a tractable technology problem supported by scientific evidence and understanding.

Jan 5, 2020

Fighting Ebola and other Highly Hazardous Pathogens In A Hot Zone! — Colonel (ret) Dr. Mark Kortepeter, MD, MPH — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, defense, genetics, health, life extension, military, posthumanism, science

Jan 5, 2020

Dr. Lucica Ditiu — Executive Director of the Stop TB Partnership — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, biological, biotech/medical, genetics, health, life extension, posthumanism, science, transhumanism

Jan 4, 2020

Rethinking Consciousness: A Scientific Theory of Subjective Experience

Posted by in categories: biological, food, neuroscience, robotics/AI

If you’re interested in mind uploading, I have a book that I highly recommend. Rethinking Consciousness is a book by Michael S. A. Graziano, who is a Princeton University professor of psychology and neuroscience.

Early in his book Graziano writes a short summary:

“This book, however, is written entirely for the general reader. In it, I attempt to spell out, as simply and clearly as possible, a promising scientific theory of consciousness — one that can apply equally to biological brains and artificial machines.”

Continue reading “Rethinking Consciousness: A Scientific Theory of Subjective Experience” »

Jan 3, 2020

Fat-dissolving bile acids may help regulate gut immunity and inflammation

Posted by in category: biological

Could bile acids—the fat-dissolving juices churned out by the liver and gallbladder—also play a role in immunity and inflammation?

The answer appears to be yes, according to two separate Harvard Medical School studies published in Nature.

The findings of the two studies, both conducted in mice, show that bile acids promote the differentiation and activity of several types of T cells involved in regulating inflammation and linked to intestinal inflammatory conditions. They also reveal that gut microbes are critical for converting bile acids into immune-signaling molecules.

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