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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 86

Jun 22, 2016

A federal panel just gave the green light to use gene editing on humans

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, health

Scientists are one step closer to using CRISPR gene editing on humans, with a US federal advisory panel approving the use of the technique for a study led by the University of Pennsylvania.

The scientists are seeking to use the CRISPR-Cas9 technique to create genetically altered T cells – white blood cells that play an important role in our immune system – that are more effective at fighting cancer cells in patients with melanoma, multiple myeloma, and sarcoma.

“Our preliminary data suggests that we could improve the efficacy of these T cells if we use CRISPR,” lead researcher Carl June told the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) on Tuesday.

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Jun 20, 2016

Money Behind First CRISPR Test? It’s from Internet Billionaire Sean Parker

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, economics, internet

A next wave of cancer treatments may combine immunotherapy and gene editing.

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Jun 19, 2016

Genetically enhancing our children could raise interest rates

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, economics, genetics, government, neuroscience

Always a trickle down effect on things that improve or change. Just reconfirms and reminds us organically how everything is indeed connected.


Capital tends to have greater value the more skilled and educated the workforce. Anticipating genetically enhanced workers would cause firms to want to invest more now in new equipment and buildings. Many assets, such as real estate and intellectual property, become more valuable the richer a society and so expectations of a much higher economic growth rate would cause companies to spend more buying and developing these assets so that businesses, as well as governments, will wish to borrow more when they realize the potential of human genetic engineering.

Many individuals will reduce their savings rate in anticipation of a future richer society. Today, fear that Social Security won’t survive motivates many Americans to save, but this fear and so this incentive for saving would disappear once genetic engineering for intelligence proves feasible. Furthermore, many citizens would rationally expect future government benefits to senior citizens to increase in a world made richer by genetic engineering and this expectation would reduce the perceived need to save for retirement.

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Jun 18, 2016

First Human Test of CRISPR Proposed

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania seek approval for gene editing to fight cancer.

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Jun 15, 2016

SynBio Advances on Multiple Fronts

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, life extension

List of the who’s who are leading some of key bio programs around nextgen bio/ living cell technologies.


According to GEN’s experts, synthetic biology isn’t yet plug-and-play, but cellular processes are being engineered into biosensing systems as well as biologics production. Soon, for tasks from theranostics to regenerative medicine, “there will be a synbio app for that.”

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Jun 10, 2016

Living Bacteria Can Now Store Data

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, genetics

Using the CRISPR gene-editing tool, scientists from Harvard University have developed a technique that permanently records data into living cells. Incredibly, the information imprinted onto these microorganisms can be passed down to the next generation.

CRISPR/Cas9 is turning into an incredibly versatile tool. The cheap and easy-to-use molecular editing system that burst onto the biotech scene only a few years ago is being used for a host of applications, including genetic engineering, RNA editing, disease modeling, and fighting retroviruses like HIV. And now, as described in a new Science paper, it can also be used to turn lowly microorganisms into veritable hard drives.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/5935415/why-dna-is-the-future-of-data-storage

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Jun 9, 2016

Engineered pathogen-binding protein enables rapid isolation of infectious bacteria from joint fluids

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Very cool.


Pinpointing the type of bacteria that are at the root of an infection in clinical samples removed from living tissues, such as blood, urine or joint fluids, to quickly identify the best anti-microbial therapy still poses a formidable challenge. The standard method of culturing can take days to reveal pathogens, and they often fail to bring them to light altogether.

A team lead by Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University now reports a method in PLoS, which enables the rapid isolation and concentration of infectious bacteria from complex clinical samples to help speed up bacterial identification, and it should be able to accelerate the determination of antibiotic susceptibilities as well.

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Jun 8, 2016

Slime mold gives insight into the intelligence of neuron-less organisms

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, neuroscience

How do organisms without brains make decisions? Most of life is brainless and the vast majority of organisms on Earth lack neurons altogether. Plants, fungi and bacteria must all cope with the same problem as humans — to make the best choices in a complex and ever-changing world or risk dying — without the help of a simple nervous system in many cases.

A team of researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), the University of Sydney, the University of Sheffield and the University of Leeds recently studied this problem in the unicellular slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, a single-cell organism that can grow to several square meters in size. This giant cell, which typically lives in shady, cool and moist areas of temperate forests, spreads out to search its environment like an amoeba, extending oozy tendrils along the forest floor in search of its prey of fungi, bacteria and decaying vegetable matter.

Neither plant, animal nor fungus, P. polycephalum has become an unlikely candidate for studies of cognition, due to its spectacular problem-solving abilities. In recent studies, Physarum has been shown to solve labyrinth mazes, make complicated trade-offs, anticipate periodic events, remember where it has been, construct transport networks that have similar efficiency to those designed by human engineers and even make irrational decisions — a capability that has long been viewed as a by-product of brain circuitry.

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Jun 7, 2016

Sources of longevity genes for genetic engineering

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, life extension

There are various animals that can live for centuries or millenia.

Genetic engineering technology is rapidly improving and genome wide genetic engineering could become a reality within 10–20 years. It could be possible to replicate in humans the longevity genes and cancer immunity in certain animals.

The longest lived mammal is the bowhead whales. Some confirmed sources estimate bowhead whales to have lived at least to 211 years of age.

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Jun 5, 2016

We can now ‘cut and paste’ RNA in addition to DNA, and it could disable viruses

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

You’ve probably heard of CRISPR — the gene editing tool that essentially lets scientists cut and paste DNA, removing things like HIV and muscular dystrophy from our cells — and now scientists have discovered a way to edit RNA with just as much precision.

RNA is DNA’s close biological cousin, responsible for translating messages from the nucleus to the rest of the cell, and being able to change it could open up all-new disease-fighting possibilities.

Just like CRISPR/Cas9 editing, the new procedure selectively cuts up RNA, which gives us microscopic control over genetic information, and the researchers behind it say it could open up the method could be used to block viruses and halt disease in its tracks.

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