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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 11

Jul 28, 2019

First Human CRISPR Trial in the US Aims to Cure Inherited Blindness

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Gene editing is advancing at a faster pace than most of us can keep up with. One significant recent announcement was gene editing tool CRISPR’s application to non-genetic diseases thanks to a new ability to edit single letters in RNA.

Even as CRISPR reaches milestones like this, scientists continue to find new uses for it to treat genetic conditions. The next one that will hit clinics is a CRISPR treatment for a form of blindness called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA).

Having been approved by the FDA in December, the treatment will be the first of its kind to be trialed in the US.

Jul 23, 2019

Dr. Calixto Machado, MD. PhD. Clinical Neurophysiology and Neurology; Author of “Brain Death: A Reappraisal” — ideaXme Show — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, DNA, life extension, neuroscience, science, transhumanism

Jul 20, 2019

Taking the sting out: Australian gene editing is crossing the pain threshold

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

A Sydney team has developed a box jellyfish antidote so simple it can go on as a spray. But it’s only the first step.

Jul 19, 2019

Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice’s minds

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, neuroscience

Hallucinations are spooky and, fortunately, fairly rare. But, a new study suggests, the real question isn’t so much why some people occasionally experience them. It’s why all of us aren’t hallucinating all the time.

In the study, Stanford University School of Medicine neuroscientists stimulated nerve cells in the visual cortex of to induce an illusory image in the animals’ minds. The scientists needed to stimulate a surprisingly small number of , or neurons, in order to generate the perception, which caused the mice to behave in a particular way.

“Back in 2012, we had described the ability to control the activity of individually selected neurons in an awake, alert animal,” said Karl Deisseroth, MD, Ph.D., professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “Now, for the first time, we’ve been able to advance this capability to control multiple individually specified cells at once, and make an animal perceive something specific that in fact is not really there—and behave accordingly.”

Jul 19, 2019

Regenerage International, IIMET, and Bioquark Inc. to Collaborate on Clinical Study in Biologic Age Reversal of Photodamaged Skin

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, chemistry, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, science

https://www.prweb.com/releases/regenerage_international_iime…449142.htm

Pretty girl applying moisturizing cream in front of mirror

Jul 19, 2019

Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, robotics/AI

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings. (Video credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab; footage of droplets courtesy of Xubo Liu and Tom Russell/Berkeley Lab)

Jul 18, 2019

Viewpoint: Why CRISPR-edited crops should be allowed in organic agriculture

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics, health

A University of California, Berkeley professor stands at the front of the room, delivering her invited talk about the potential of genetic engineering. Her audience, full of organic farming advocates, listens uneasily. She notices a man get up from his seat and move toward the front of the room. Confused, the speaker pauses mid-sentence as she watches him bend over, reach for the power cord, and unplug the projector. The room darkens and silence falls. So much for listening to the ideas of others.

Many organic advocates claim that genetically engineered crops are harmful to human health, the environment, and the farmers who work with them. Biotechnology advocates fire back that genetically engineered crops are safe, reduce insecticide use, and allow farmers in developing countries to produce enough food to feed themselves and their families.

Now, sides are being chosen about whether the new gene editing technology, CRISPR, is really just “GMO 2.0” or a helpful new tool to speed up the plant breeding process. In July, the European Union’s Court of Justice ruled that crops made with CRISPR will be classified as genetically engineered. In the United States, meanwhile, the regulatory system is drawing distinctions between genetic engineering and specific uses of genome editing.

Jul 15, 2019

Bolonkin Explores Ultimate Uploading and Technology

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, nanotechnology, nuclear energy

One of the main speculations about future technology is uploading. This is where our minds are copied in exact detail from our biological physical bodies and then created in artificial bodies. Alexander Bolonkin has posited many kinds of technology over the decades. He has a recent work which is summarized here where he considers that future uploading will mean that we can then use super-technology (nanotechnology, nuclear fusion etc…) to make people into literal gods and supermen. We can use control of matter, energy and information to make what he calls the E-man. Bolonkin then indicates that uploading and creation of minds could be used for the resurrection of long-dead people. This would be where we create the very close approximation of dead people. This would be like using gene editing to turn an African Elephant into a Whooly Mammoth. The vast technological capability would let us actualize what would be a simulation into living entities.

Bolonkin’s Case for E-Man and Resurrection

Alexander Bolonkin looks at methods and possibilities for electronic resurrection of long-dead outstanding personalities. He also considers the principles and organization of the new E-society, its goals and conditions of existence.

Jul 15, 2019

Lipid Nanoparticles Deliver CRISPR/Cas9 into Organs with High Efficiency

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, nanotechnology

Researchers at Tufts University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a new lipid nanoparticle which can deliver CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tools into organs with high efficiency, suggesting that the system is promising for clinical applications.

The CRISPR/Cas9 system is currently being investigated as a way to treat a variety of diseases with a genetic basis, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington’s, and sickle cell disease. While the system has significant promise, there are some issues that need to be resolved before it can be used clinically. CRISPR/Cas9 is a large complex, and it is difficult to get it inside cell nuclei where it is needed for gene editing.

Scientists have tried a variety of delivery vehicles for CRISPR/Cas, which are intended to carry the gene editing tools to their location and help them enter the cell and nucleus. These have included viruses and various types of nanoparticle. However, to date, these have suffered from low efficiency, whereby very little of the delivered agent reaches the cells or organs where it is needed.

Jul 11, 2019

Bioengineered Organs: Could Change be the horizon?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

The science of tissue engineering has been constructed on a foundation of a very simple concept; take out the patient’s own cells, grow them in a sterile environment similar to that of a human body and infuse them on a scaffolding material to provide 3-dimensional support. With this recipe, you may have your own laboratory-grown organ ready! It is interesting to note that quite a few patients have experienced the benefits of this fastest growing technology. Could change be on the horizon?

Introduction

Various scientific investigations have been frequently hailed as putting forth a novel yet a breakthrough treatment to change the meaning of lives of many patients, who have been suffering from degenerative diseases since long. However, it should be noted that researchers have to travel a really long road to turn a laboratory invention into viable clinical modalities. In this regard, current medical issues associated with gastrointestinal functioning are marred with various challenges; new solutions to take over the control are sorely needed.

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