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Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category: Page 101

Jul 5, 2016

Amazon moves one step closer toward army of warehouse robots

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, 4D printing, robotics/AI

I told folks just the other day; US Manufacturing in the next 3 to 5 years will primarily be robots, 3-/4-D printers, other AI systems, and a couple of line managers to spot check quality of the operation. Just surprised Amazon wasn’t already fully robotic.


Amazon’s progress toward an army of helpful robots is one step closer: a prize for the best warehouse-working “picker” machine has gone to a robot designed by a team from TU Delft Robotics Institute and Delft Robotics, both based in the Netherlands.

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Jul 5, 2016

Multi-planar Processing: Rhinoplasty Implant

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs

With the advantage of high resolution providing facial designs that can be created based on the FACS (facial active coding system), 3D photography scanning and printing of the subject will create images with connected feature grids. This allows the angles of the craniomaxillofacial surface to be observed for specific unique aspects of physical characteristics, for underlying anatomical bone structures based on eye to midline features.

The nasal process provides the centerpiece of anatomical facial mapping and organization which affects how the individual is viewed by the world around them. These connected grids with the aid of imaging allow for facial feature approximation for important craniofacial-facial planning creating vital structures that will be 3D printed according to accepted innovation in FACS (Facial active coding system) design. Medical grade silicone soft tissue prosthetics with colour are being created out of the UK with the Picsisma printer by Fripp Design as far back as 2013.

silicone pros

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Jul 4, 2016

3D Printing Metal Interview with Arcam CEO Magnus René

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

“May you live in interesting times,” resonates with many involved in the metal 3D printing industry, an ironic phrase regarded by some as a curse. Magnus René, CEO of the Arcam Group AB, might one of the last to agree. In the 3D metal printing market Arcam are unique. Holding propriety Electron Beam Melting (EBM) patents the company is at the forefront of cutting edge industries such as aerospace and medicine. I asked Arcam’s CEO about some of these developments.

René compares today’s additive manufacturing landscape to an earlier career experience in another industry at the frontier of technology.

“I was with a company that developed and released the [semiconductor] printers that are used still to this day for manufacture. Those were also interesting times, we really felt that we were changing the way things were manufactured.”

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Jul 3, 2016

‘Growing’ drones is under research

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, drones, military

It sounds like an idea for a science fiction film, but here in the UK scientists and engineers are spending time and money to see if they can do exactly that.

British warplanes are already flying with parts made from a 3D printer. Researchers are already using that same technology to build drones.

The military advantage is obvious — building equipment quickly and close to the battlefield — without long waits and long supply chains — gives you an enormous advantage over any enemy.

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Jun 30, 2016

3D Printing + Five Axes = 5D Printing?

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, 4D printing, neuroscience

This article is a bit odd to me. Why? Because the way 5D printing is describe is not that much more advance than 3D printing. In fact, 4D printing (as shown by Mitsubishi Lads) prints an object that self evolves/ assembles itself into the object specification submitted to the printer. In another article, it was highlighted that 5D printing would take the 4D printing formation and apply technology that enables the object/s to have intelligence to repair/ evolve over time. So, at this point 5D is still being defined.


3D-printed parts made with five-axis technology are stronger and use less material.

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Jun 30, 2016

Tiny 3D Printed Cameras with Enormous Potential

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, drones, mobile phones

3D printing has has a presence in the medical industry since the 1980s for modelling body parts that are otherwise untouchable without invasive surgery, but research into the potential of this technology is bringing clinicians closer to getting a good look up close at the real thing. Instead of scans, what about injecting a camera no bigger than a grain of salt into your patient?

A group of German researchers have been working on a complex lens system that is small enough to fit inside a syringe, and applications aren’t just limited to the medical industry. They have the potential to also be used in many products which need parts to be as small and light as possible, such as drones and smart phones.

syringe-camera-4

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Jun 30, 2016

The World’s First Freeform 3D Printed House Is Slated To Open in 2017

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

With Singapore planning to 3D print public housing and the fascinating 3D Print Canal House in Amsterdam, the concept of 3D printed houses is hardly new. But as a result of a Freeform Home Design Challenge hosted by a Tennessee-based startup Branch Technology, the world will see its first freeform 3D printed house called ‘Curve Appeal’ by first half of 2017.

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Jun 29, 2016

Smart Dust Is Coming: New Camera Is the Size of a Grain of Salt

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, computing, mobile phones

Miniaturization is one of the most world-shaking trends of the last several decades. Computer chips now have features measured in billionths of a meter. Sensors that once weighed kilograms fit inside your smartphone. But it doesn’t end there.

Researchers are aiming to take sensors smaller—much smaller.

In a new University of Stuttgart paper published in Nature Photonics, scientists describe tiny 3D printed lenses and show how they can take super sharp images. Each lens is 120 millionths of a meter in diameter—roughly the size of a grain of table salt—and because they’re 3D printed in one piece, complexity is no barrier. Any lens configuration that can be designed on a computer can be printed and used.

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Jun 28, 2016

ODNI wants help securing biometric systems

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, biotech/medical, privacy

Glad they are doing something on this because my biggest concern on biometrics and systems storing other people’s DNA/ bio information is criminals hacking in and collecting bio information on people and reselling it on the Dark Web. With this type of information; criminals can do many interesting things especially if they have access to a gene editing kit, or 3D printers, etc. We have seen how easy it is to create gene editing kits and selling them on the net for $129 each. And, how 3D printers can replicate synthetic skin, contacts mimicking eye structures, etc. So, criminals can do some amazing things once they have access to anyone’s biometrics information.


A biometric system to verify travelers exiting the country could be in effect as soon as 2018.

By Kayla Nick-Kearney.

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Jun 26, 2016

Electronics on the Fly

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, electronics

Laura speaks with Simon Fried, Co-founder of Nano Dimension about how the Israeli 3D printed electronics company is changing the role of PCBs.

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