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Sep 7, 2017

High-Dimensional Quantum Encryption Performed in Real-World City Conditions for First Time

Posted by in categories: encryption, quantum physics, satellites

For the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city. The demonstration showed that it could one day be practical to use high-capacity, free-space quantum communication to create a highly secure link between ground-based networks and satellites, a requirement for creating a global quantum encryption network.

Quantum encryption uses photons to encode information in the form of quantum bits. In its simplest form, known as 2D encryption, each photon encodes one bit: either a one or a zero. Scientists have shown that a single photon can encode even more information—a concept known as high-dimensional quantum encryption—but until now this has never been demonstrated with free-space optical communication in real-world conditions. With eight bits necessary to encode just one letter, for example, packing more information into each photon would significantly speed up data transmission.

“Our work is the first to send messages in a secure manner using high-dimensional quantum encryption in realistic city conditions, including turbulence,” said research team lead, Ebrahim Karimi, University of Ottawa, Canada. “The secure, free-space communication scheme we demonstrated could potentially link Earth with satellites, securely connect places where it is too expensive to install fiber, or be used for encrypted communication with a moving object, such as an airplane.”

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Sep 7, 2017

Jaguar’s steering wheel of the future revolves around AI

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

The steering wheel as we know it doesn’t have a bright future — in fact, it might disappear altogether as self-driving cars hit the road. Jaguar Land Rover, however, has an idea as to how it might survive. The British automaker has unveiled a concept steering wheel, Sayer, that’s designed for an era where cars normally drive themselves and personal ownership is a thing of the past. The wheel would have its own AI system, and would follow you from car to car — you’d just hook it in to bring your experience with you.

The AI would largely serve as a concierge. It would link you to an on-demand service club, whether or not you own your car, and would help you get a ride when and where you need it. If there’s a must-attend meeting, for example, you could tell the wheel while it’s still in your living room and it would figure out when a car needs to arrive and tell you when you might want to take control.

Sayer (named after influential designer Malcolm Sayer) will be a core feature on an upcoming concept car, the Future-Type.

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Sep 7, 2017

This Tiny Country Feeds the World

Posted by in category: food

The tiny Netherlands has become an agricultural powerhouse—the second largest global exporter of food by dollar value after the U.S.—with only a fraction of the land available to other countries. How has it achieved this? By using the world’s most efficient agricultural technologies.

Harvesting.

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Sep 7, 2017

The human brain can create structures in up to 11 dimensions

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Neuroscientists have used the application of sophisticated mathematics to peer into the structure of our brains. What they’ve discovered is that the brain contains multi-dimensional geometrical structures and spaces within the networks of our brains that operate in 11 dimensions.

We’re used to seeing the world in 3 dimensions, but this recent study is opening up new research into the brain and how we perceive reality.

Algebraic topology, popularly known as “rubber-sheet geometry”, is used to study different kinds of hole structures, and scientists say the research has significant implications for our understanding of the brain.

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Sep 7, 2017

SanDisk’s New microSD Card Can Store an Impressive Amount of Data

Posted by in category: computing

SanDisk has unleasehd a new model, the microSXDC USH-I, which stores 400GB of data, one of many other advances in data storage undergoing major revolution.

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Sep 7, 2017

Veo Gives Robots ‘Eyes and a Brain’ So They Can Safely Work With People

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

The robots are coming.

Actually, they’re already here. Machines are learning to do tasks they’ve never done before, from locating and retrieving goods from a shelf to driving cars to performing surgery. In manufacturing environments, robots can place an object with millimeter precision over and over, lift hundreds of pounds without getting tired, and repeat the same action constantly for hundreds of hours.

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Sep 7, 2017

Paul Spiegel: Beyond Retirement – A New Social Compact for the Age of Longevity

Posted by in categories: business, cryonics, law, life extension

During the recent Longevity and Cryopreservation Summit in Madrid, LEAF board member Paul Spiegel discussed the social ramifications of increased lifespans thanks to emerging technologies. He spoke of the need for society to adapt to deal with longer lives. We invite you to watch the talk he gave and also to read an interview providing deeper insight on the necessary changes in the pension system.

But first, a few words about Paul. Paul graduated cum laude from the University of California, Berkeley in 1979 and from Boalt Hall School of Law in 1983. He has attended Harvard Law School, the University of Paris, Sorbonne, and International Christian University in Tokyo.

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Sep 7, 2017

Anxiety Disorders and Panic Attacks

Posted by in categories: health, neuroscience

Alison Sommer graduated from Carleton with a degree in Asian Studies, and now works as an academic technologist at Macalester College. She believes that awareness is the first step to improving problems within mental health care, and will be speaking about anxiety disorders and panic attacks based on her own constantly evolving understanding of her anxiety disorder, OCD. Alison’s greatest loves are her family, hockey and Star Wars.

My first goal here today is not to have a panic attack right on stage. I have an anxiety disorder called Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or OCD. Obsessive Compulsive…I have a form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder that causes me to become anxious or frightened when something wrong or unexpected happens. Like if somebody sits at my seat at the table.

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Sep 7, 2017

Researchers uncover new way of growing stem cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, materials

Research led by The University of Western Australia has discovered a new, simple and less expensive way of growing human stem cells.

Using hydrogel, a gel with a gradient that can be used to mimic the of human body tissues, the researchers were able to generate positive outcomes for the growth of stem cells.

Dr Yu Suk Choi from UWA’s School of Human Sciences at The University of Western Australia led the international collaboration which also included researchers from the University of California, San Diego (USA) and Max Planck Institute for Medical Research (Germany).

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Sep 7, 2017

This New Proof of Majorana Fermions Is Going to Be Massive For Quantum Devices

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Quantum computers based on the twisting pathways of moving particles have so far lived only in theory – the particles they would rely on might not even exist.

But with the exciting discovery of electrons ‘swirling’ down a wire, the hunt is over for exactly the particles such quantum devices have been waiting for. Now the work of turning these theoretical computers into reality could soon be underway.

Researchers from the University of Sydney and Microsoft have observed electrons forming a kind of matter called a quasiparticle under conditions that saw them behave as theoretical objects called Majorana fermions.

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