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Archive for the ‘nuclear energy’ category: Page 7

Mar 22, 2022

Nuclear Energy Company Proposes a New Reactor to Take Care of the Waste Problem

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

Transmutex is reinventing nuclear energy from first principles using a process that uses radioactive waste as a fuel source.


Transmutex, a Swiss company, states on its website that it is “reinventing nuclear energy from first principles” by using a process that uses radioactive waste as a fuel source.

Its transmitter is a particle accelerator that produces nuclear energy with fewer contaminants than any reactor on the market today. The technology represents a valuable tool in the transition to intermittent renewables by providing baseload energy-producing alternatives to fossil-fuel thermal power stations.

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Mar 20, 2022

Finland Will Store Nuclear Waste in an Underground Tomb for 100,000 Years

Posted by in categories: futurism, nuclear energy

Finland is building a nuclear waste disposal site deep under the tiny city of Eurajoki. Called Onkalo, meaning “deep pit” in Finnish, the nuclear waste repository is slated to open in 2024. If all goes to plan, copper casks will safely store spent uranium fuel rods for at least the next 100,000 years. But what happens when we bury nuclear waste, and how does this fit into Finland’s nuclear future?

Finland is a Scandinavian country about the size of Montana with about five times the population at 5.5 million residents. (That said, Finland is the 216th nation in the world by population density, showing just how sparse Montana really is.) The population is concentrated in the south, with just 200,000 people living around and above the Arctic Circle in northern Finland.

Mar 17, 2022

China’s Artificial Sun Creates a New Record!

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Mar 14, 2022

New record temperature for spherical tokamak

Posted by in categories: government, nuclear energy

Tokamak Energy, based near Oxford, UK, has demonstrated a world-first with its privately-funded ST40 spherical tokamak. The reactor achieved a plasma temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius, the threshold required for commercial fusion energy.

At nearly seven times hotter than the centre of the Sun, this is by far the highest temperature ever generated within a spherical tokamak and also by any privately-funded tokamak. The ST40 had previously achieved a temperature of 15 million degrees in June 2018. While several government laboratories have reported plasma temperatures above 100 million degrees in conventional tokamaks, this milestone has been achieved in just five years, for a cost of less than £50m ($70m) and in a much more compact fusion device. This provides further proof that spherical tokamaks are a viable route to the delivery of clean, secure, low cost, scalable fusion energy.

Mar 14, 2022

Using pump lasers to create plasma lenses that focus at very high intensity levels

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

A team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University has developed plasma-based techniques to build a lens for laser beams with petawatt-scale power. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the two techniques they developed.

Physicists conducting work with and fusion research efforts are hopeful that other researchers will build lasers that are more powerful than those currently available. Such work has been held up by the solid-state optics technology used to create lasers—giving them more power would damage the parts used to generate the laser, making them useless. In this new effort, the researchers noted that other researchers have found that plasma can be used to create optic components such as amplifiers and mirrors. They wondered if the same might be true for the kind of lens needed to produce extremely powerful laser beams. They came up with a concept that involved inducing patterns of high and in a given plasma. Light moving through it, they note, would experience a based on the density of the plasma.

The researchers did not actually build such a laser, but instead, proposed two ways that it might be built. The first method involved firing two pump lasers at a gas sample. The first laser ionized the gas into a plasma, while the second did not. The result was a plasma with a bulls-eye configuration of high and low-density plasma rings, which could be used as a laser lens.

Mar 13, 2022

Tokamak Energy achieves record-breaking plasma temperature of 100M degrees

Posted by in categories: government, nuclear energy

If nuclear fusion reaction – the process that powers the Sun and other stars – could be used on a consistent basis on Earth, it would be a source of virtually unlimited clean energy. But there are still a lot of obstacles to overcome.

U.K.-based nuclear fusion firm Tokamak Energy has demonstrated a world-first with its privately-funded ST40 spherical tokamak, achieving a plasma temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. This threshold is necessary for the future deployment of commercially successful fusion power. According to the company, this is by far the highest temperature ever achieved in a spherical tokamak and by any privately funded tokamak.

Several government laboratories have reported plasma temperatures above 100 million degrees in conventional tokamaks, including South Korea’s KSTAR reactor and China’s “artificial sun” EAST tokamak reactor. However, Tokamak Energy highlights that its milestone has been achieved in just five years, or a cost of less than £50m ($70m), in a much more compact fusion device. This achievement further substantiates spherical tokamaks as the optimal route to the delivery of clean, secure, low-cost, scalable, and globally deployable commercial fusion energy.

Continue reading “Tokamak Energy achieves record-breaking plasma temperature of 100M degrees” »

Mar 11, 2022

Tokamak Energy moves closer to commercial fusion: 100M degree plasma a world record for a spherical tokamak

Posted by in categories: government, nuclear energy

OXFORD, England 0, March 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Tokamak Energy has demonstrated a world-first with its privately-funded ST40 spherical tokamak, achieving a plasma temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius, the threshold required for commercial fusion energy.

This is by far the highest temperature ever achieved in a spherical tokamak and by any privately funded tokamak. While several government laboratories have reported plasma temperatures above 100M degrees in conventional tokamaks, this milestone has been achieved in just five years, for a cost of less than £50m ($70m), in a much more compact fusion device. This achievement further substantiates spherical tokamaks as the optimal route to the delivery of clean, secure, low cost, scalable and globally deployable commercial fusion energy.

Mar 7, 2022

Scientists confirm thermonuclear fusion in a sheared-flow Z-pinch device

Posted by in categories: computing, nuclear energy, physics

In findings that could help advance another “viable pathway” to fusion energy, research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicists has proven the existence of neutrons produced through thermonuclear reactions from a sheared-flow stabilized Z-pinch device.

The researchers used advanced computer modeling techniques and diagnostic measurement devices honed at LLNL to solve a decades-old problem of distinguishing neutrons produced by from ones produced by ion beam-driven instabilities for plasmas in the magneto-inertial fusion regime.

While the team’s previous research showed neutrons measured from sheared-flow stabilized Z-pinch devices were “consistent with thermonuclear production, we hadn’t completely proven it yet,” said LLNL physicist Drew Higginson, one of the co-authors of a paper recently published in Physics of Plasmas.

Mar 7, 2022

Powerful New Magnet May Lead to a Fusion Energy Future Sooner Than Later

Posted by in categories: futurism, nuclear energy

The superconducting magnet seen here could be the key ingredient in finally producing a commercial fusion reactor.


The magnet will be deployed in the SPARC tokamak developed by MIT which is currently under construction with a 2025 completion date.

Mar 7, 2022

Local nuclear reactor helps scientists catch and study neutrinos

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

A nuclear reactor at an Illinois energy plant is helping University of Chicago scientists learn how to catch and understand the tiny, elusive particles known as neutrinos.

At Constellation’s (formerly Exelon) Dresden Generating Station in Morris, Illinois, the team took the first measurements of coming off a with a tiny detector. These particles are extremely hard to catch because they interact so rarely with matter, but power reactors are one of the few places on Earth with a high concentration of them.

“This was an exciting opportunity to benefit from the enormous neutrino production from a reactor, but also a challenge in the noisy industrial environment right next to a reactor,” said Prof. Juan Collar, a particle physicist who led the research. “This is the closest that neutrino physicists have been able to get to a commercial reactor core. We gained unique experience in operating a detector under these conditions, thanks to Constellation’s generosity in accommodating our experiment.”

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