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Archive for the ‘education’ category: Page 4

Jan 4, 2020

Steven Kwast | The Urgent Need for a U.S. Space Force

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, ethics, government, law, policy, sex, space

Starfleet Begins


Steven L. Kwast is a retired Air Force general and former commander of the Air Education and Training Command at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. A graduate of the United States Air Force Academy with a degree in astronautical engineering, he holds a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He is a past president of the Air Force’s Air University in Montgomery, Alabama, and a former fighter pilot with extensive combat and command experience. He is the author of the study, “Fast Space: Leveraging Ultra Low-Cost Space Access for 21st Century Challenges.”

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Jan 3, 2020

50 Year Lie: Sugar industry blames fats

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, economics, education, ethics, food, health, science

Whenever someone refers me to a story with alarming facts that should surprise or outrage any thinking human, my spider-sense is activated. Does the story make sense? Is it plausible? If the message contains evidence of being repeated (or forwarded to more than two friends), then whatever is claimed is almost certain to be false.

If the subject is important to me—or if there is any chance that it might influence my view of the world, I check it at Snopes. The reputable web site confirms or debunks many urban legends and all sorts of viral web hype.

You never know what you might learn at Snopes. You can easily be lured into a rabbit hole, digging into the site beyond whatever prompted your visit in the first place.

Fact-checking can be fun! For example:

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Dec 29, 2019

36C3: Phyphox – Using Smartphone Sensors For Physics Experiments

Posted by in categories: education, media & arts, mobile phones, physics, transportation

It’s no secret that the average smart phone today packs an abundance of gadgets fitting in your pocket, which could have easily filled a car trunk a few decades ago. We like to think about video cameras, music playing equipment, and maybe even telephones here, but let’s not ignore the amount of measurement equipment we also carry around in form of tiny sensors nowadays. How to use those sensors for educational purposes to teach physics is presented in [Sebastian Staacks]’ talk at 36C3 about the phyphox mobile lab app.

While accessing a mobile device’s sensor data is usually quite straightforwardly done through some API calls, the phyphox app is not only a shortcut to nicely graph all the available sensor data on the screen, it also exports the data for additional visualization and processing later on. An accompanying experiment editor allows to define custom experiments from data capture to analysis that are stored in an XML-based file format and possible to share through QR codes.

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Dec 27, 2019

How To Build A Tougher Mind: Dr Jon Finn

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, education, neuroscience

Dr Shima Beigi BSc, MSc, MSc, Ph.D. founder of Mindfulness Engineering™️ and ideaXme Rich Connectedness™️ ambassador interviews Dr Jon Finn founder Tougher Minds.

Dr Jon Finn:

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Dec 26, 2019

Mosque, synagogue and church being built together in Abu Dhabi

Posted by in categories: education, space

On September 20, the initial designs for the complex were presented at an event at the New York Public Library in midtown Manhattan. British firm Adjaye Associates won the contract to design the center, which will consist of three large buildings arranged around a central garden, under which will sit a museum and education center.

“We were led towards these powerful plutonic forms with a clear geometry, three cubes sitting on a plinth — though not aligned, they each have different orientations,” Sir David Adjaye told designboom. Each of the three buildings share a similar silhouette, but the facades have different architectural design and detailing, communicating the shared origins of the three religions, as well as their cultural and historical differences.

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Dec 26, 2019

China dreams of becoming an AI utopia – here’s the reality

Posted by in categories: education, food, health, robotics/AI, surveillance

This is the fourth instalment in a four-part series examining the brewing US-China war over the development and deployment of artificial intelligence technology.

China has had success with AI and surveillance, but when it comes to social issues such as education, health care and agriculture, there is still a ways to go.

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Dec 22, 2019

America’s newest national park is a massive sand dune

Posted by in category: education

White Sands National Monument in New Mexico is now White Sands National Park.

On Friday, President Donald Trump signed the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 that, among many other things, stripped away the monument status and upgraded it to “national park.” The 275 square miles of desert filled with gypsum sand dunes in southern New Mexico became the 62nd national park in the federal system.

The act proclaims the establishment of White Sands Park is intended “to protect, preserve, and restore its scenic, scientific, educational, natural, geological, historical, cultural, archaeological, paleontological, hydrological, fish, wildlife, and recreational values and to enhance visitor experiences…”

Dec 22, 2019

Want to Increase Your Chances of Living Longer? Go to a Museum, Says a New Study

Posted by in category: education

New research examines the lifespan effects of visiting museums and having other cultural experiences, and the results are very encouraging.

Dec 20, 2019

How Far is Too Far? | The Age of A.I.

Posted by in categories: education, media & arts, robotics/AI

Can A.I. make music? Can it feel excitement and fear? Is it alive? Will.i.am and Mark Sagar push the limits of what a machine can do. How far is too far, and how much further can we go?

The Age of A.I. is a 8 part documentary series hosted by Robert Downey Jr. covering the ways Artifial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Neural Networks will change the world.

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Dec 18, 2019

Brent Nally interviews Bill Faloon about his longevity clinical trial

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, education, food, life extension, media & arts

Hayley Harrison is on a constant Roll… Here she sent me privately this video of the great Bill Faloon… I have not completed the video as yet… But the beginning is awesome I will watch late tonight during my down time… Great Respect to Life Extension and Bill Faloon and Neal Francis Vanderee two of the Longevity Movements most interesting characters and the movements many activists such as Hayley “the watchful” Harrison… AEWR.


My mission is to drastically improve your life by helping you break bad habits, build and keep new healthy habits to make you the best version of yourself.

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