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Archive for the ‘education’ category: Page 3

Jun 25, 2019

“Reverse Engineering the Universe”

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, physics, space

Andrei Linde, the Harald Trap Friis Professor of Physics at Stanford University, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium on Tues., May 8, 2018 entitled “Reverse Engineering the Universe.” This lecture will be held in the Hewlett Teaching Center, Room 200.

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Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium

Jun 23, 2019

Researchers Find Missing Link Between the Brain and Immune System

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, neuroscience

Implications profound for neurological diseases from autism to Alzheimer’s to multiple sclerosis. In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University.

Jun 9, 2019

The surprising way some people are fighting aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, life extension

Dr. Alan Green’s patients travel from around the country to his tiny practice in Queens, N.Y., lured by the prospect of longer lives.

Over the past two years, more than 200 patients have flocked to see Green after learning that two drugs he prescribes could possibly stave off aging. One 95-year-old was so intent on keeping her appointment that she asked her son to drive her from Maryland after a snowstorm had closed the schools.

Green is among a small but growing number of doctors who prescribe drugs “off-label” for their possible anti-aging effects. Metformin is typically prescribed for diabetes, and rapamycin prevents organ rejection after a transplant, but doctors can prescribe drugs off-label for other purposes — in this case, for “aging.”

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Jun 7, 2019

The age of Machine Intelligence is here: Are you ready?

Posted by in categories: business, education, robotics/AI

Are you prepared for the Age of Machine Intelligence? That’s a time when machines anticipate consumers’ choices before they are made. That age is nearer than many people realize, according to author/futurist Mike Walsh, who said business leaders need to understand how the new reality impacts the decisions they make.

The National Automatic Merchandising Association show, held last week in Las Vegas, made an appropriate setting for Walsh’s message, given the number of exhibits and education sessions featuring artificial intelligence. While these new technologies impact many industries, the convenience services industry has experienced a significant boost in recent years thanks to AI, micro markets, cashless readers, digital signage, telemetry-based remote machine monitoring, smart sensor shelving, facial detection and voice technology.

Walsh, author of “The Dictionary of Dangerous Ideas” and CEO of Tomorrow, a consumer innovation research lab, challenged his listeners during his keynote presentation to think more creatively.

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Jun 7, 2019

AI Course with Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig: Udacity Course

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, finance, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a field that has a long history but is still constantly and actively growing and changing. Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives. It has uses in a variety of industries from gaming, journalism/media, to finance, as well as in the state-of-the-art research fields from robotics, medical diagnosis, and quantum science.


Udacity was born out of a Stanford University experiment in which Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig offered their “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence” course online to anyone, for free. Over 160,000 students in more than 190 countries enrolled and not much later, Udacity was born.

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Jun 5, 2019

David Sinclair – Slowing down Aging (VIDEO)

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics, life extension

David A. Sinclair, Ph.D., A.O. is an Australian biologist and a Professor in the Department of Genetics and co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. He is best known for his work on understanding why we age and how to slow its effects. He obtained his Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, and received the Australian Commonwealth Prize. In 1995, he received a Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics then worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with Leonard Guarente. Since 1999 he has been a tenured professor in the Genetics Department of Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Sinclair is co-founder of several biotechnology companies (Sirtris, Ovascience, Genocea, Cohbar, MetroBiotech, ArcBio, Liberty Biosecurity) and is on the boards of several others. He is also co-founder and co-chief editor of the journal Aging. His work is featured in five books, two documentary movies, 60 Minutes, Morgan Freeman’s “Through the Wormhole” and other media.

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Jun 3, 2019

Daily briefing: Stunning science images shortlisted for the Wellcome photography prize

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, science

Amazing science, technology and medicine photography, how to explain a bad year to grad schools and a call to make research misconduct reports public.

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Jun 1, 2019

Black female physicist pioneers technology that kills cancer cells with lasers

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, nanotechnology, neuroscience

Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green is one of fewer than 100 black female physicists in the country, and the recent winner of $1.1 million grant to further develop a technology she’s pioneered that uses laser-activated nanoparticles to treat cancer.

Green, who lost her parents young, was raised by her aunt and uncle. While still at school, her aunt died from cancer, and three months later her uncle was diagnosed with cancer, too. Green went on to earn her degree in physics at Alabama A&M University, being crowned Homecoming Queen while she was at it, before going on full scholarship to University of Alabama in Birmingham to earn her Masters and Ph.D. There Green would become the first to work out how to deliver nanoparticles into cancer cells exclusively, so that a laser could be used to remove them, and then successfully carry out her treatment on living animals.

As she takes on her growing responsibilities, Green still makes time to speak at schools, Boys & Girls Clubs and other youth events. “Young black girls don’t see those role models (scientists) as often as they see Beyonce or Nicki Minaj,” says Green. “It’s important to know that our brains are capable of more.”

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May 30, 2019

ideaXme — Patricia Weltin — Founder — Beyond the Diagnosis

Posted by in categories: aging, architecture, biotech/medical, business, DNA, economics, education, finance, genetics, health

May 29, 2019

AI Film “Do You Trust This Computer” Director Chris Paine on Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: education, Elon Musk, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI

My guest today is Chris Paine, director of the AI documentary film “Do You Trust This Computer?” and previously the documentary “Who Killed the Electric Car?”. The new film is a powerful examination of artificial intelligence centered around insights from the most high-profile thinkers on the subject, including Elon Musk, Stuart Russell, Max Tegmark, Ray Kurzweil, Andrew Ng, Westworld creator Jonathan Nolan and many more. Chris set out to ask these leaders in the field “what scares smart people about AI”, and they did not hold back.

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