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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 532

Nov 18, 2017

Scientists invent the world’s first microchip powered by biological systems

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing

Researchers at Columbia University have successfully created the world’s first computer chip powered by an isolated chemical biological process. Natural systems emit enormous amounts of energy that is often underutilized. This new bio-chip represents a high-tech version of “working with nature” and is producing promising results in the laboratory.

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Nov 15, 2017

IBM makes 20 qubit quantum computing machine available as a cloud service

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

IBM has been offering quantum computing as a cloud service since last year when it came out with a 5 qubit version of the advanced computers. Today, the company announced that it’s releasing 20-qubit quantum computers, quite a leap in just 18 months. A qubit is a single unit of quantum information.

The company also announced that IBM researchers had successfully built a 50 qubit prototype, which is the next milestone for quantum computing, but it’s unclear when we will see this commercially available.

While the earliest versions of IBM’s quantum computers were offered for free to build a community of users, and help educate people on programming and using these machines, today’s announcement is the first commercial offering. It will be available by the end of the year.

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Nov 15, 2017

The Quantum Computer Factory That’s Taking on Google and IBM

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Who says Silicon Valley doesn’t fund real technology any more?

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Nov 15, 2017

Why This New Quantum Computing Startup Has a Real Shot at Beating Its Competition

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete with the likes of IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Intel to bring quantum computing out of the lab and into the wider world. There’s one good reason to think it might be able to beat them all.

That’s because Quantum Circuits was founded by Robert Schoelkopf, a professor at Yale, whose work in many ways has helped kick-start this exciting new era of quantum advances.

Quantum computers exploit two strange features of quantum physics, entanglement and superposition, to process information in a fundamentally different way from traditional computers. The approach allows the power of such machines to scale dramatically with even just a few quantum bits, or qubits. Those racing to build practical quantum computers are nearing the point where quantum machines will be capable of doing things that no conventional machine could—an inflection point known as quantum supremacy.

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Nov 12, 2017

This $100-million Startup Plans to Put Chips Into Human Brains to Enhance Intelligence

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

A startup with a $100 million investment wants to implant chips into human brains to enhance their abilities.

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Nov 11, 2017

Scientists decipher mechanisms in cells for extending human longevity

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, engineering, life extension

Aging cells periodically switch their chromatin state. The image illustrates the “on” and “off” patterns in individual cells. (credit: UC San Diego)

A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego led by biologist Nan Hao have combined engineering, computer science, and biology technologies to decode the molecular processes in cells that influence aging.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM says it’s reached milestone in quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer.

Dario Gil, who leads IBM’s and artificial intelligence research division, said Friday that the company’s scientists have successfully built and measured a processor prototype with 50 , known as qubits.

Gil says it’s the first time any company has built a quantum computer at this scale.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM announces a trailblazing quantum machine

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Researchers have built the most sophisticated quantum computer yet, signaling progress toward a powerful new way of processing information.

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Nov 7, 2017

Fluidic transistor ushers the age of liquid computers

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience, space travel

Transistors, those tiny electrical switches that process signals and data, are the brain power behind every electronic device – from laptops and smartphones to your digital thermostat. As they continue to shrink in size, computers have become smaller, more powerful, and more pervasive. However, as we look to build squishy, human-friendly machines that have the look and feel of soft natural organisms, we need to look beyond the rigid materials used to create electrical switches and circuits.

Mechanical engineers Carmel Majidi and James Wissman of the Soft Machines Lab at Carnegie Mellon University have been looking at new ways to create electronics that are not just digitally functional but also soft and deformable. Rather than making from rigid metals like copper or silver, they use a special metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature. This alloy, made by mixing indium and gallium, is a non-toxic alternative to mercury and can be infused in rubber to make circuits that are as soft and elastic as natural skin.

Teaming up with Michael Dickey at North Carolina State University, they recently discovered that electronics are not only useful for stretchable circuit wiring but can also be used to make . These fluidic transistors work by opening and closing the connection between two liquid metal droplets. When a voltage drop is applied in one direction, the droplets move towards each other and coalesce to form a metallic bridge for conducting electricity. When voltage is applied in a different direction, the droplets spontaneously break apart and turn the switch to open. By quickly alternating between an open and closed and open switch state with only a small amount of voltage, the researchers were able to mimic the properties of a conventional transistor.

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Nov 3, 2017

This Captivating Sci-Fi Short Film Was Randomly Generated By a Computer

Posted by in categories: alien life, computing, mathematics

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that Julius Horsthuis spent weeks designing and animating his sci-fi short, Fraktaal, using 3D software. But as the artist reveals, “It so happens that I’m a lazy animator.” So he instead relied on complex mathematical fractal patterns to automatically generate the alien worlds and cities visited in his film.

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