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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 352

Dec 21, 2016

JILA atomic clock mimics long-sought synthetic magnetic state

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Nice.


Using their advanced atomic clock to mimic other desirable quantum systems, JILA physicists have caused atoms in a gas to behave as if they possess unusual magnetic properties long sought in harder-to-study solid materials. Representing a novel “off-label” use for atomic clocks, the research could lead to the creation of new materials for applications such as “spintronic” devices and quantum computers.

JILA’s record-setting atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are trapped in a laser grid known as an , turns out to be an excellent model for the magnetic behavior of crystalline solids at the atomic scale. Such models are valuable for studying the counterintuitive rules of quantum mechanics.

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Dec 21, 2016

Scientist Who Faked Research to Receive Grants, Sentenced to 18-Months

Posted by in categories: computing, government, quantum physics

Doesn’t pay to fraud the government. The real question is why it took so long (4 years).


Defendant submitted false data and information instead of building and testing experimental components

OAKLAND – S. Darin Kinion, Ph.D., was sentenced today to 18 months’ imprisonment for submitting false data and reports to defraud the United States in connection with a quantum computing research program announced United States Attorney Brian J. Stretch, U.S. Department of Energy Special Agent in Charge of the Office of the Inspector General Scott Berenberg, and Inspector General of the Intelligence Community I. Charles McCullough III. The sentence follows a guilty plea entered June 14, 2016, in which Kinion acknowledged submitting false data and reports to the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (“IARPA”) of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in a scheme to defraud the government out of money intended to fund research.

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Dec 21, 2016

NIST Calls For Submissions Of Quantum-Proof Encryption Algorithms As Threat Of Quantum Computers Looms Closer

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, information science, quantum physics

Many more great things are coming.


NIST called on cryptography researchers to submit their quantum-proof encryption algorithms by November 30. NIST is the latest government agency to start taking the threat of quantum computers seriously.

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Dec 21, 2016

Presidential candidate suggests microchips for Syrian refugees

Posted by in categories: computing, cyborgs, geopolitics, terrorism, transhumanism

In light of the recent attacks in Europe, the search for terrorists, and the ongoing refugee/immigration issues, I still support considering this idea of implants. In fact, so long as the Middle East is in strife, and large amounts of refugees are created, and fundamental religiosity thrives, I’m certain some type of tracking technology implementation in the developed world is inevitable over the next 2–15 years for refugees and some immigrants. Such technology broadly remains the humanitarian thing to do (read the article!), while still protecting the public and national interests.

https://www.cnet.com/news/presidential-candidate-suggests-mi…-refugees/ #transhumanism #Germany #terrorism #immigration


The question of allowing Syrian refugees in to the United States has created a political firestorm in the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris and one Presidential candidate proposes a novel, high-tech solution, but it’s also likely to make plenty of Americans uncomfortable.

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Dec 20, 2016

Stanford manufactures gene-engineered cells to cure the incurable

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, life extension

Stanford University’s amazing new regenerative medicine facility where the impossible is becoming possible.


The 25,000-square-foot facility, which opened last September, puts Stanford at the forefront of one of medicine’s most important and promising trends: regenerative medicine, which aims to refurbish diseased or damaged tissue using the body’s own healthy cells.

“We’re curing the incurable,” said laboratory director David DiGiusto, who holds a doctorate.

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Dec 20, 2016

Why Microsoft believes we’re on the threshold of quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

The time is right to make quantum computing real…

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Dec 20, 2016

The Next Big Thing In Your Next Device Could Be This Ultra-Thin Lighting

Posted by in category: computing

With micro-LEDS, Rohinni aims to advance product lighting, starting with laptops.

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Dec 18, 2016

The Simulation Hypothesis: Is Reality All Just A Computer Simulation?

Posted by in categories: computing, Elon Musk

In Brief As technology improves, the possibility that our world may be a simulated one is becoming more and more probable, argues Universe Today founder Fraser Cain. But can we ever prove that we live in a simulation of a reality?

All the world’s a stage. Or is it a simulation?

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Dec 18, 2016

A New Kind of Computer Chip: Silicon May Be Replaced by New Material

Posted by in categories: computing, materials

At the forefront of computing technology for decades, silicon-based chips’ reign may soon end, as today’s chip designers are looking for other materials that offer more options and more amazing abilities than the silicon we all know and love.

This new trend has spurred the guys at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop what could be the foundation for multi-role computer chips.

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Dec 16, 2016

Does The Universe Have a Hard Drive?

Posted by in categories: computing, cosmology, physics, quantum physics, supercomputing

Zura Kakushadze is lead author of this peer reviewed paper published by the Free University of Tbilisi. It describes an information paradox that arises in a materialist’s description of the Universe—if we assume that the Universe is 100% quantum. The observation of the paradox stems from an interdisciplinary thought process whereby the Universe can be viewed as a “quantum computer”.

The presentation is intentionally nontechnical to make it accessible to a wide a readership.

Does the Universe Have a Hard Drive?