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Feb 25, 2016

Mercedes is ditching some robots in favor of human staff

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

No Robots Please says Mercedes; at least for their manufacturing teams that does specialized/ custom work.


Our dystopian all-robot future just got hit with a minor setback: Mercedes-Benz is ditching some of its robot workers in favor of humans, citing the human ability to move faster and perform a wider array of tasks. The reason largely revolves around Mercedes’ increased array of customization options — there are so many different individualization options at the moment that robots aren’t able to deal with them all. Humans, the auto maker says, are saving the company money.

Mercedes’ individualization options include things like various tire valve caps, trim, and cupholders, small but significant aspects of the vehicles that robots aren’t easily able to switch between. According to Daimler AG’s Markus Schaefer, “The variety is too much to take on for the machines. They can’t work with all the different options and keep pace with changes.”

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Feb 25, 2016

Beam Me Up, Scotty? Turns Out Your Brain Is Ready for Teleportation

Posted by in categories: entertainment, neuroscience

People who play video games are geared (at least their brain is) for teleporting.


UC Davis researchers found that when people experienced virtual teleportation, their brains still managed to keep them on course.

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Feb 25, 2016

Nitric oxide protects against parasite invasion and brain inflammation

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

African trypanosomiasis is called ‘sleeping sickness’ because when the infection is untreated, trypanosome parasites will invade the brain and cause disruption of sleeping patterns and irreversible neurological damage. A study published on February 25th in PLOS Pathogens reports that in a mouse model of trypanosome disease, nitric oxide (NO) plays an unexpected role in preserving the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB), thereby reducing parasite invasion into the brain, and likely limiting neurological damage.

NO is generally thought to be a pro-inflammatory signal, promoting a strong immune response against pathogens. The resulting inflammation is a mixed blessing: on one hand, it helps to control potentially dangerous pathogens, but on the other, it can cause “collateral damage” to the inflamed tissue.

Martin Rottenberg and colleagues, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, are interested in how trypanosome cause disease and in the host immune defense against them. In this study, they examine the role of NO in a of trypanosomiasis, with a focus on how the parasites manage to get through the so-called (BBB), the border surrounding the mammalian that is normally impenetrable to foreign intruders as well as most host cells.

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Feb 25, 2016

Researchers use brain’s plasticity to treat movement disorder dystonia, help stroke survivors

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Interesting research and maybe a new twist for Dystonia.


Exactly what triggers dystonia — an involuntary muscle contraction of the hand, fingers, neck or mouth, which is sometimes very painful — is unclear. But some researchers think the underlying problem that causes it may also be the key to treating it, and other brain-linked disorders like Parkinson’s.

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Feb 25, 2016

Meet Brain, The AI Engine That Wants To Replace Search

Posted by in categories: food, neuroscience, robotics/AI

Fifteen miles away from where Larry Page and Sergey Brin worked out of their first office developing the technology that would become Google, a team of eleven engineers no older than 20 are hard at work on developing what they hope will be its replacement.

Their adoptive home, for the moment, is the co-working space Tim Draper set up as part of his Draper University startup program, and they’ve been assembled their by Jerry Yue, a 24-year-old serial entrepreneur.

Yue’s last startup, the Chinese food delivery service Benlai.com, raised $100 million at the end of last year and is on its way to joining the ranks of China’s unicorns.

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Feb 25, 2016

Doctors implant 3D-printed vertebrae in ‘world’s first’ surgery

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs, neuroscience

Just Amazing


Ralph Mobbs, a neurosurgeon at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, made medical history in late 2015 when he successfully replaced two vertebrae with custom made prosthesis. The patient, in his 60s, suffered from Chordoma, a particularly nasty form of cancer that had formed on his top two vertebrae and threatened to cinch off his spinal cord as it grew. That would have left him a quadriplegic. Complicating matters, those top two vertebrae are what allow you to turn and tilt your head, so it’s not like doctors can easily fashion a replacement out of bone grafted from another part of the patient’s body. They have to fit perfectly and that’s where the 3D printers come in.

Mobbs worked with Anatomics, an Australian medical device manufacturer, to craft perfect replicas of the patient’s top two vertebrae out of titanium. This is the first time that these two particular neck bones have been printed and installed. “To be able to get the printed implant that you know will fit perfectly because you’ve already done the operation on a model … It was just a pure delight,” Mobbs told Mashable Australia. “It was as if someone had switched on a light and said ‘crikey, if this isn’t the future, well then I don’t know what is’.”

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Feb 25, 2016

Defence white paper faces the reality of Australia’s engagement with Asia and the Pacific

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, security

Australia’s improved alliance with China on defense, and Quantum Computing. Australia has been one of the early R&D groups working on Quantum Computing just like D-Wave, Stanford, UC Berkley, etc. So, this could help China drastically migrate much sooner to a Quantum infrastructure.


You think you’ve heard it before: Australia’s great security challenge this century is the dramatic shift in power to Asia epitomised by the rise of China.

But read of the latest Defence white paper if you want that abstract idea to sink in.

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Feb 25, 2016

NP-complete problem solved with biological motors

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, Ray Kurzweil, singularity

I am glad to see this article publish because it expresses well how technology and biological properties can be intertwined and advance collectively together. It will take this type of an approach to provide the foundation that is needed to enable the future visions that Kurzweil and others have shared around Singularity.

2 decades ago, Lucent experimented with the cells from fish to see how they could enable digital transmission through their experiments. They had some small successes; however, it never fully matured. Today, however, with Quantum we will finally see the advancements in technology, medicine, and science that many have only dreamed about or read from books or saw in movies.


Biological systems can explore every possible solution rapidly.

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Feb 25, 2016

Quantum Algorithms and Their Discontents

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, information science, life extension, materials, neuroscience, quantum physics, robotics/AI, security, space

Interesting read; however, the author has limited his view to Quantum being only a computing solution when in fact it is much more. Quantum technology does offer faster processing power & better security; but, Quantum offers us Q-Dots which enables us to enrich medicines & other treatments, improves raw materials including fuels, even vegetation.

For the first time we have a science that cuts across all areas of technology, medical & biology, chemistry, manufacturing, etc. No other science has been able to achieve this like Quantum.

Also, the author in statements around being years off has some truth if we’re suggesting 7 yrs then I agree. However, more than 7 years I don’t agree especially with the results we are seeing in Quantum Networking.

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Feb 25, 2016

Regenerative medicine scientists ‘print’ replacement tissue

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, life extension

Completed ear and jaw bone structures printed with the Integrated Tissue-Organ Printing System (credit: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center)

Using a sophisticated, custom-designed 3D printer, regenerative medicine scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have proved that it is feasible to print living tissue structures to replace injured or diseased tissue in patients.

Reporting in Nature Biotechnology, the scientists said they printed ear, bone and muscle structures. When implanted in animals, the structures matured into functional tissue and developed a system of blood vessels. Most importantly, these early results indicate that the structures have the right size, strength and function for use in humans.

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