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Sep 3, 2019

The ‘Nobel Prize of Math’ Has Been Won By A Woman For The First Time Ever

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, physics

❤👍👍👍


Greetings with some good news for the women’s world. Just recently, one of the most prestigious mathematics prizes in the world – The Abel Prize was awarded to a woman for the first time ever. Yes! Karen Uhlenbeck is a mathematician and a professor at the University of Texas and is now the first woman to win this prize in mathematics. You go Karen!

The award, which is modeled by the Nobel Prize, is awarded by the king of Norway to honor mathematicians who have made an influence in their field including a cash prize of around $700,000. The award to Karen cites for “the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry and mathematical physics.” This award exists since 2003 but has only been won by men since.

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Sep 2, 2019

Automating Scientific Discovery in Physics using Hybrid AI Models

Posted by in categories: physics, robotics/AI

PhD Project — Automating Scientific Discovery in Physics using Hybrid AI Models at University of Manchester, listed on FindAPhD.com.

Sep 2, 2019

Computer Program Self-Discovers Laws of Physics

Posted by in categories: computing, physics

Circa 2009


In just over a day, a powerful computer program accomplished a feat that took physicists centuries to complete: extrapolating the laws of motion from a pendulum’s swings.

Developed by Cornell researchers, the program deduced the natural laws without a shred of knowledge about physics or geometry.

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Sep 2, 2019

Supersymmetry: The Future of Physics Explained

Posted by in categories: futurism, physics

What is supersymmetry? Physicist Lawrence Krauss helps you understand the theory that could solve many of the most troublesome problems in physics.

Sep 2, 2019

The Feynman Lectures on Physics Vol. II Ch. 34: The Magnetism of Matter

Posted by in category: physics

Dear Reader.

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Aug 30, 2019

Physicists Outline an Ambitious Plan to Simulate Black Holes With Holograms

Posted by in categories: cosmology, holograms, physics

Black holes are some of the most powerful and fascinating phenomena in our Universe, but due to their tendency to swallow up anything nearby, getting up close to them for some detailed analysis isn’t possible right now.

Instead, scientists have put forward a proposal for how we might be able to model these massive, complex objects in the lab — using holograms.

While experiments haven’t yet been carried out, the researchers have put forward a theoretical framework for a black hole hologram that would allow us to test some of the more mysterious and elusive properties of black holes — specifically what happens to the laws of physics beyond its event horizon.

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Aug 28, 2019

To Hunt Gravitational Waves, Scientists Had to Create the Quietest Spot on Earth

Posted by in categories: physics, space, transportation

LIVINGSTON, La. — About a mile and a half from a building so big you can see it from space, every car on the road slows to a crawl. Drivers know to take the 10 mph (16 km/h) speed limit very seriously: That’s because the building houses a massive detector that’s hunting for celestial vibrations at the smallest scale ever attempted. Not surprisingly, it’s sensitive to all earthly vibrations around it, from the rumblings of a passing car to natural disasters on the other side of the globe.

As a result, scientists who work at one of the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) detectors must go to extraordinary lengths to hunt down and remove all potential sources of noise — slowing down traffic around the detector, monitoring every tiny tremor in the ground, even suspending the equipment from a quadruple pendulum system that minimizes vibrations — all in the effort to create the most “silent” vibrational spot on Earth.

Aug 27, 2019

Physicists Just Released Step-by-Step Instructions for Building a Wormhole

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics, space travel

I am going home :3.


Everybody wants a wormhole. I mean, who wants to bother traveling the long-and-slow routes throughout the universe, taking tens of thousands of years just to reach yet another boring star? Not when you can pop into the nearest wormhole opening, take a short stroll, and end up in some exotic far-flung corner of the universe.

There’s a small technical difficulty, though: Wormholes, which are bends in space-time so extreme that a shortcut tunnel forms, are catastrophically unstable. As in, as soon as you send a single photon down the hole, it collapses faster than the speed of light.

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Aug 27, 2019

From crystals to glasses: a new unified theory for heat transport

Posted by in categories: energy, physics

Theoretical physicists from SISSA and the University of California at Davis have developed a new approach to heat transport in materials, which finally allows crystals, polycrystalline solids, alloys and glasses to be treated on the same solid footing. It opens the way to the numerical simulation of the thermal properties of a vast class of materials in important fields such as energy saving, conversion, scavenging, storage, heat dissipation, shielding and the planetary sciences, which have thus far dodged a proper computational treatment. The research has been published in Nature Communications.

Heat dissipates over time. In a sense, is the defining feature of the arrow of time. In spite of the foundational importance of heat transport, the father of its modern theory, Sir Rudolph Peierls, wrote in 1961, “It seems there is no problem in modern physics for which there are on record as many false starts, and as many theories which overlook some essential feature, as in the problem of the thermal conductivity of nonconducting crystals.”

A half-century has passed since, and heat transport is still one of the most elusive chapters of theoretical materials science. As a matter of fact, no unified approach has been able to treat crystals and (partially) disordered solids on equal footing, thus hindering the efforts of generations of materials scientists to simulate certain materials, or different states of the same material occurring in the same physical system or device with the same accuracy.

Aug 26, 2019

Simulation of eight million ‘mock universes’ sheds light on galaxy evolution

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution, physics

Physics World represents a key part of IOP Publishing’s mission to communicate world-class research and innovation to the widest possible audience. The website forms part of the Physics World portfolio, a collection of online, digital and print information services for the global scientific community.

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