Blog

Archive for the ‘physics’ category: Page 17

Sep 6, 2019

2020 Breakthrough Prizes: Who won this year’s ‘Oscars of science’?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics, science

This year’s other prizes include four in the life sciences, a special prize in fundamental physics for the invention of supergravity, one winner in mathematics, and a handful of $100,000 awards for early career researchers. Recipients will be honored at an awards gala to be held on November 3 at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, and broadcast live on National Geographic.


A record-setting black hole picture and advances in how we perceive pain are among the winners of this year’s $3-million prizes.

Continue reading “2020 Breakthrough Prizes: Who won this year’s ‘Oscars of science’?” »

Sep 4, 2019

Nikola Tesla On Antigravity Technology, Flying Saucers Powered By Tesla Coils And The Ether

Posted by in categories: energy, physics

In the mid-1800’s to the early 1900’s Tesla file for more than 110 patents in varying technologies. From his magnifying transmitter, than uses an air coil or vortex to generate massive voltages, to wireless transmissions of power which Tesla used to prove transmission of data, power, and even lighting a layer of the strata as early as 1900. For this reason many consider Nikola Tesla to be one of the most brilliant scientists the world have ever seen.

Tesla’s dynamic theory of gravity explains the relation between gravity and electromagnetics in the same field. This was due to the presence of aether, also known as ether, which is a space-filling medium that is necessary for the propagation of forces either through electromagnetic or gravitational in nature. In plain English, Aether is the medium necessary for any exchange on these levels. Also, Aether was removed from theory in modern physics and was replaced with more abstract models. In looking at Tesla’s ideas and results; it appears that modern physics is wrong.

In the late 1800’s Tesla presented his Dynamic Theory of Gravity, which was a model over matter, Aether, and energy. Tesla’s version of this medium is closer to the gas theory and has extreme elasticity and a very high permeability. He also felt that Aether was much more common and filled all of the space.

Continue reading “Nikola Tesla On Antigravity Technology, Flying Saucers Powered By Tesla Coils And The Ether” »

Sep 4, 2019

Incredibly Weird Dark Energy –“Its Source Unknown, Location Unknown, Physics Unknown”

Posted by in categories: alien life, physics

“Dark energy is incredibly strange, but actually it makes sense to me that it went unnoticed,” said Noble Prize winning physicist Adam Riess in an interview. “I have absolutely no clue what dark energy is. Dark energy appears strong enough to push the entire universe – yet its source is unknown, its location is unknown and its physics are highly speculative.”

Physicists have found that for the last 7 billion years or so galactic expansion has been accelerating. This would be possible only if something is pushing the galaxies, adding energy to them. Scientists are calling this something “dark energy,” a force that is real but eludes detection.

One of the most speculative ideas for the mechanism of an accelerating cosmic expansion is called quintessence, a relative of the Higgs field that permeates the cosmos. Perhaps some clever life 5 billion years ago figured out how to activate that field, speculates astrophysicist Caleb Scharf in Nautil.us. How? “Beats me,” he says, “but it’s a thought-provoking idea, and it echoes some of the thinking of cosmologist Freeman Dyson’s famous 1979 paper ”Time Without End,” where he looked at life’s ability in the far, far future to act on an astrophysical scale in an open universe that need not evolve into a state of permanent quiescence. Where life and communication can continue for ever.

Continue reading “Incredibly Weird Dark Energy --‘Its Source Unknown, Location Unknown, Physics Unknown’” »

Sep 3, 2019

The ‘Nobel Prize of Math’ Has Been Won By A Woman For The First Time Ever

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, physics

❤👍👍👍


Greetings with some good news for the women’s world. Just recently, one of the most prestigious mathematics prizes in the world – The Abel Prize was awarded to a woman for the first time ever. Yes! Karen Uhlenbeck is a mathematician and a professor at the University of Texas and is now the first woman to win this prize in mathematics. You go Karen!

The award, which is modeled by the Nobel Prize, is awarded by the king of Norway to honor mathematicians who have made an influence in their field including a cash prize of around $700,000. The award to Karen cites for “the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry and mathematical physics.” This award exists since 2003 but has only been won by men since.

Continue reading “The ‘Nobel Prize of Math’ Has Been Won By A Woman For The First Time Ever” »

Sep 2, 2019

Automating Scientific Discovery in Physics using Hybrid AI Models

Posted by in categories: physics, robotics/AI

PhD Project — Automating Scientific Discovery in Physics using Hybrid AI Models at University of Manchester, listed on FindAPhD.com.

Sep 2, 2019

Computer Program Self-Discovers Laws of Physics

Posted by in categories: computing, physics

Circa 2009


In just over a day, a powerful computer program accomplished a feat that took physicists centuries to complete: extrapolating the laws of motion from a pendulum’s swings.

Developed by Cornell researchers, the program deduced the natural laws without a shred of knowledge about physics or geometry.

Continue reading “Computer Program Self-Discovers Laws of Physics” »

Sep 2, 2019

Supersymmetry: The Future of Physics Explained

Posted by in categories: futurism, physics

What is supersymmetry? Physicist Lawrence Krauss helps you understand the theory that could solve many of the most troublesome problems in physics.

Sep 2, 2019

The Feynman Lectures on Physics Vol. II Ch. 34: The Magnetism of Matter

Posted by in category: physics

Dear Reader.

There are several reasons you might be seeing this page. In order to read the online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, javascript must be supported by your browser and enabled. If you have have visited this website previously it’s possible you may have a mixture of incompatible files (.js,.css, and.html) in your browser cache. If you use an ad blocker it may be preventing our pages from downloading necessary resources. So, please try the following: make sure javascript is enabled, clear your browser cache (at least of files from feynmanlectures.caltech.edu), turn off your browser extensions, and open this page:

Aug 30, 2019

Physicists Outline an Ambitious Plan to Simulate Black Holes With Holograms

Posted by in categories: cosmology, holograms, physics

Black holes are some of the most powerful and fascinating phenomena in our Universe, but due to their tendency to swallow up anything nearby, getting up close to them for some detailed analysis isn’t possible right now.

Instead, scientists have put forward a proposal for how we might be able to model these massive, complex objects in the lab — using holograms.

While experiments haven’t yet been carried out, the researchers have put forward a theoretical framework for a black hole hologram that would allow us to test some of the more mysterious and elusive properties of black holes — specifically what happens to the laws of physics beyond its event horizon.

Continue reading “Physicists Outline an Ambitious Plan to Simulate Black Holes With Holograms” »

Aug 28, 2019

To Hunt Gravitational Waves, Scientists Had to Create the Quietest Spot on Earth

Posted by in categories: physics, space, transportation

LIVINGSTON, La. — About a mile and a half from a building so big you can see it from space, every car on the road slows to a crawl. Drivers know to take the 10 mph (16 km/h) speed limit very seriously: That’s because the building houses a massive detector that’s hunting for celestial vibrations at the smallest scale ever attempted. Not surprisingly, it’s sensitive to all earthly vibrations around it, from the rumblings of a passing car to natural disasters on the other side of the globe.

As a result, scientists who work at one of the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) detectors must go to extraordinary lengths to hunt down and remove all potential sources of noise — slowing down traffic around the detector, monitoring every tiny tremor in the ground, even suspending the equipment from a quadruple pendulum system that minimizes vibrations — all in the effort to create the most “silent” vibrational spot on Earth.

Page 17 of 108First1415161718192021Last