Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘food’ category: Page 192

Dec 14, 2016

Monster-wheat grown by Oxford could revolutionise farming

Posted by in categories: energy, food, genetics

A crop spray which can boost farmer’s wheat yields by one fifth, without the need for genetic modification, has been developed by scientists at Oxford University.

Researchers have found a molecule which helps plants make the best use of the sugary fuel that they generate during photosynthesis. And with more fuel, the plants can produce bigger grains.

Other scientists in Britain have developed ways to genetically modify crops to increase yields, and the Department of Environment is currently deciding whether to allow a field trial for GM wheat in Hertfordshire.

Continue reading “Monster-wheat grown by Oxford could revolutionise farming” »

Dec 10, 2016

Turning the potential of electronic printables into a real breakthrough

Posted by in categories: engineering, food

Those “sell by” or “best by” dates that you see on food packaging? They’re so last century. In the future, built-in sensors in food labels will not only tell you when a product is going bad but also if you’re storing it correctly. Some might even be able to give you a breakdown of its nutritional data. All this is thanks to developments in the burgeoning world of printable electronics. Now researchers at MIT have invented a printing process that could turn a lot of the potential breakthroughs, such as electricity-generating clothing and smart sutures we’ve been seeing in this space, into an inexpensive reality.

“There is a huge need for printing of electronic devices that are extremely inexpensive but provide simple computations and interactive functions,” says A. John Hart, an associate professor in contemporary technology and mechanical engineering.

While some researchers have been studying the possibility of using inkjet printing and rubber stamping, these techniques have produced mixed results at best, often resulting in fuzzy, coffee-ring patterns or incomplete circuits due to the difficulty of controlling ink flow at such small scales.

Continue reading “Turning the potential of electronic printables into a real breakthrough” »

Dec 10, 2016

Robots are already replacing fast-food workers

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI

Trump’s pick for labor chief, the CEO of Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr., likes the idea.

Read more

Dec 6, 2016

Microsoft launches its latest artificial intelligence chatbot on Kik

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI

The chatbot can answer questions and respond to prompts, while using teenage slang, and emoji.

The bot could even use puns, such as ‘I want a pizza that action’, when chatting about food.

But after chatting with Zo for a while, the bot seemed to get easily confused and go off tangent.

Continue reading “Microsoft launches its latest artificial intelligence chatbot on Kik” »

Dec 4, 2016

Would you eat a pizza delivered by a drone?

Posted by in categories: drones, food

Read more

Dec 3, 2016

To shield crops from disease, scientists want to use insects to carry protective genes to plants

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics

DARPA scientists think they can use insects to deliver genetic changes to crops.

Read more

Nov 25, 2016

New Plant Synbio Tool Breaks With Tradition

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food

JBEI researchers develop efficient and affordable method for plant DNA assembly.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in collaboration with Berkeley Lab’s Environmental Genomics & Systems Biology Division and the DOE Joint Genome Institute developed a versatile system (named jStack) which utilizes yeast homologous recombination to efficiently assemble DNA into plant transformation vectors. The new approach will impact plant engineering for the bioenergy, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries.

Although synthetic biology has provided solutions to many societal challenges, little research has been devoted to advancing synthetic biology in plants. Microbes, such as yeast and Escherichia coli (E. coli), have received much of the attention in developing synthetic biology tools due to their fast generation time and the ease of working with these organisms in laboratories. A shortage of characterized DNA parts, along with the difficulty of efficiently assembling multiple and large fragments of DNA into plant transformation vectors, has limited progress in studying and engineering plants to the same degree as their microbial counterparts.

Continue reading “New Plant Synbio Tool Breaks With Tradition” »

Nov 25, 2016

Study: Ice Cream For Breakfast Boosts Brain Performance

Posted by in categories: food, neuroscience

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — All the years of your parents saying “NO” to ice cream for breakfast may have actually stunted your brilliance.

According to The Telegraph, a new study performed by Yoshihiko Koga, a professor at Kyorin University in Tokyo, revealed that eating a certain amount of ice cream immediately after waking up in the morning can actually make you smarter.

No, you did not misread that!

Continue reading “Study: Ice Cream For Breakfast Boosts Brain Performance” »

Nov 25, 2016

Changes in the diet affect epigenetics via the microbiota

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics, health

You get out what you put in.


You are what you eat, the old saying goes, but why is that so? Researchers have known for some time that diet affects the balance of microbes in our bodies, but how that translates into an effect on the host has not been understood. Now, research in mice is showing that microbes communicate with their hosts by sending out metabolites that act on histones—thus influencing gene transcription not only in the colon but also in tissues in other parts of the body. The findings publish November 23 in Molecular Cell.

“This is the first of what we hope is a long, fruitful set of studies to understand the connection between the microbiome in the gut and its influence on host health,” says John Denu, a professor of biomolecular chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and one of the study’s senior authors. “We wanted to look at whether the gut microbiota affect epigenetic programming in a variety of different tissues in the host.” These tissues were in the proximal colon, the liver, and fat .

Continue reading “Changes in the diet affect epigenetics via the microbiota” »

Nov 22, 2016

A synthetic biological metabolic pathway fixes CO2 more efficiently than plants

Posted by in categories: biological, climatology, food, sustainability

In future, greenhouse gas carbon dioxide could be removed from the atmosphere by deploying a new biological method. A team headed by Tobias Erb, Leader of a Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, has developed a synthetic but completely biological metabolic pathway based on the model of photosynthesis that fixes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere 20% more efficiently that plants can photosynthetically. The researchers initially planned the new system, which they presented in the magazine Science this week, on the drawing board and then turned it into reality in the laboratory.

Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges of our time. The concentration of (CO2) in the atmosphere owing to human activities has continually risen since the start of the Industrial Revolution. All scientific evidence indicates that this increase is exacerbating the greenhouse effect and changing the climate. The consequences are already clearly evident. To overcome the environmental as well as the social challenge of climate change, “we must find new ways of sustainably removing excessive CO2 from the atmosphere and turning it into something useful,” underlined Erb, who leads a Junior Research Group at the Max Planck Institute in Marburg.

Continue reading “A synthetic biological metabolic pathway fixes CO2 more efficiently than plants” »