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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category: Page 6

Jan 20, 2020

Samsung Electronics appoints its youngest president as new mobile chief

Posted by in categories: electronics, mobile phones

A new beginning

Roh Tae-moon was pivotal to the development of the Galaxy brand, and he’s now overseeing Samsung’s mobile efforts.

Harish Jonnalagadda

Continue reading “Samsung Electronics appoints its youngest president as new mobile chief” »

Jan 19, 2020

LG TV Morphs From Flat Screen to Curved With Press of a Button

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

At CES, LG Display is showing off a 65-inch concept TV that can bend at the edges, allowing it to switch from a flat-screen display to a curved one in about five seconds. The company also put a bendable OLED on a foldable tablet/laptop.

Jan 16, 2020

World’s smallest camera is size of a grain of sand

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics

OmniVision OV6948 makes it into Guinness Book of Records and will save lives in the hands of surgeons.

Jan 2, 2020

The Tech That Will Invade Our Lives in 2020

Posted by in categories: electronics, habitats

In 2020 and the coming decade, these trends are likely to gather momentum. They will also be on display next week at CES, an enormous consumer electronics trade show in Las Vegas that typically serves as a window into the year’s hottest tech developments.


From smart homes to ultrafast wireless speeds, here’s what to watch.

Dec 27, 2019

Move aside drones, the next extreme cameras could be mounted on go-anywhere cars

Posted by in categories: drones, electronics

Four-wheeled vehicles with integrated action cameras may be remote-controlled and could provide an alternative to drones and hand-held cams.

Dec 26, 2019

AirTV Mini adds Prime Video to the Android TV dongle

Posted by in categories: electronics, mobile phones

AirTV Mini is one of the few dongles using Google’s Android TV platform and now, the product has been updated to support Amazon Prime Video.

Dec 17, 2019

Watch SpaceX launch a Boeing-built satellite and attempt to recover its spacecraft fairing live

Posted by in categories: electronics, satellites

SpaceX is launching yet another rocket this evening — its 13th this year. This Falcon 9 launch is set for liftoff sometime during a window that’ll last for just over an hour, and that opens at 7:10 PM EST (4:10 PM PST) and extends to 8:38 PM EST (5:38 PM PST). The launch will use a first-stage rocket booster that previously flew in May and July of this year, and it’ll include an attempted landing of that booster, as well as a try at recovering both halves of the fairing used to protect the spacecraft’s cargo as it ascends to space.

The cargo itself is a satellite built by Boeing that hosts two payloads for different clients, including Japanese pay TV broadcast service provider SKY Perfect JSAT, and a high-speed broadband connectivity satellite developed by Kratos called Kacific1. The Falcon 9 spacecraft will be looking to deliver these to orbit around half-an-hour after liftoff.

It’s definitely going to be worth watching the secondary mission elements of this one, as SpaceX has so far succeeded only in recovering one half of a fairing used during a mission with a single barge stationed in the ocean. This will see it try to catch both pieces, using two ships named “Ms. Tree” and “Ms. Chief” that have been retrofitted with a large net assembly specifically for the purpose.

Continue reading “Watch SpaceX launch a Boeing-built satellite and attempt to recover its spacecraft fairing live” »

Dec 12, 2019

2019 QLED 8K Q900 65 — Specs & Price US

Posted by in categories: electronics, innovation

Discover the latest features and innovations available in the 65 inches Class Q900 QLED Smart 8K UHD TV (2019). Find the perfect TVs for you!

Nov 20, 2019

Flexible organic electrodes built using water-processed silver nanowires

Posted by in categories: electronics, nanotechnology

Organic electronic devices, which are made of small molecules or polymers (i.e., substances composed primarily or completely of similar units bound together) are known to have several advantageous properties. In fact, organic electronics have relatively low production costs, they are easy to integrate with other systems and they enable good device flexibility.

Despite their advantages, most organic optoelectronics devices do not perform as well as devices built on rigid substrates. This is primarily due to the lack of existing flexible electrodes that can simultaneously provide low resistance, high transparency and smooth surfaces.

With this in mind, researchers at Nankai University in China have recently set out to create new organic electrodes for flexible photovoltaics, devices that can be used to capture sunlight and convert it into electricity. The electrodes they developed, presented in a paper published in Nature Electronics, were built using water-processed silver nanowires and a polyelectrolyte.

Nov 11, 2019

New photonic liquid crystals could lead to next-generation displays

Posted by in categories: electronics, virtual reality

A new technique to change the structure of liquid crystals could lead to the development of fast-responding liquid crystals suitable for next generation displays—3D, augmented and virtual reality—and advanced photonic applications such as mirrorless lasers, bio-sensors and fast/slow light generation, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan.

“The liquid crystals we are working with are called blue-phase liquid crystals,” said Iam Choon Khoo, the William E. Leonhard Professor of Electrical Engineering, who is the corresponding author for this article. “The most important thing about this research is the fundamental understanding of what happens when you apply a field, which has led to the development of Repetitively-Applied Field technique. We believe that this method is almost a universal template that can be used for reconfiguring many similar types of liquid crystals and soft matter.”

Blue-phase liquid crystals typically self-assemble into a cubic photonic-crystal . The researchers believed that by creating other structures they could develop properties not present in the current form. After nearly two years of experimentation, they realized that by applying an intermittent electrical field and allowing the system to relax between applications and to dissipate accumulated heat, they could slowly coax the crystals into stable and field-free orthorhombic and tetragonal structures.

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