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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category: Page 19

Apr 16, 2019

New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible

Posted by in categories: electronics, transportation

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible, according to research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute just published in Nature Communications. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

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Apr 13, 2019

Inside the lab using mind-changing psychology experiments to solve the Israel-Palestine conflict

Posted by in categories: electronics, neuroscience

To read a man’s mind, first you have to outline his skull.

Last November, I watched a psychologist use a digital pen to draw the circumference of a man’s head. The coordinates of his brain were quickly mapped, pinpointing the precise areas within his skull that process emotions. Behind him, a massive magnetic mind-reader—a neuroimaging device called a magnetoencephalography, or MEG—emerged from the wall, funneling into an oversized white helmet. It took two scientists to slowly maneuver the apparatus into position around his head.

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Mar 30, 2019

A single superconducting artificial atom senses solid-state spins

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

An electron spin resonance spectrometer using an artificial atom (a superconducting flux qubit) is realized, featuring both high sensitivity (400 spins/√Hz) and high spatial resolution (0.05 pL).

Go to the profile of Hiraku Toida

Hiraku Toida

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Mar 20, 2019

LHC beam pipe to be mined for monopoles

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

In February, the CMS and MoEDAL collaborations at CERN signed an agreement to hand over to MoEDAL a section of the LHC beam pipe that was located inside CMS between 2008 and 2013. The delicate object, 6 metres long and made of beryllium, will now be sliced and fed into a highly precise magnetic sensors in order to allow MoEDAL to look for magnetic monopoles: hypothetical particles with only a single magnetic pole – north or south – unlike north-south dipoles we are familiar with.

Paul Dirac posited the existence of magnetic monopoles in 1931, and, although never observed, they could be produced in collisions within the LHC. They would not travel very far after being produced, binding with the beryllium nuclei of the beam pipe and remaining there awaiting discovery.

The MoEDAL collaboration will cut the beam pipe at a special facility at the Centre for Particle Physics at the University of Alberta in Canada and ship the pieces back across the Atlantic to ETH Zurich in Switzerland to look for electromagnetic anomalies in them. Many theories attempting to unify all of the known forces into a single force (so-called “Grand Unified Theories”) require the existence of monopoles and finding them could open the door to all-new physics.

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Mar 20, 2019

MEGAPIXELS: Doctors can now see everything inside you at once

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics

After years of development, a powerful and speedy full-body scanner is ready for action.

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Mar 2, 2019

Self-Powered Sensor Helps Track Firefighters in Burning Buildings

Posted by in category: electronics

No bigger than a button, it could save many lives.

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Mar 1, 2019

Parents can better cuddle premature babies thanks to tiny new sensors

Posted by in category: electronics

“Without all these cords, you feel like, this is my little human that I can pick up and snuggle,” one mom says.

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Feb 21, 2019

Physicists Have Finally Solved a Fundamental Mystery Concerning The Insides of Atoms

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

Something about atoms has never added up. Fundamental particles called quarks get kind of sluggish once they’re caught up in crowds of protons and neutrons – and quite frankly, they shouldn’t.

For decades, physicists have hunted for clues on the quark’s tendency to slow down in larger atoms, but have come up empty-handed. But now, a closer look at old data has finally revealed a clue to explain this strange phenomenon.

A massive team of physicists known as the CLAS Collaboration (after the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer) recently ran through data gathered from previous experiments at the Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility.

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Feb 20, 2019

Could Magnonics Spark the Extinction of Electronics?

Posted by in categories: electronics, existential risks

Watch Could Magnonics Spark the Extinction of Electronics?, a Tech video from Seeker.

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Feb 18, 2019

Glyph intros Thunderbolt 3 Dock with NVMe SSD support, SD card slot

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

Glyph has launched a self-named Thunderbolt 3 Dock, its key selling point being compatibility with NVMe SSDs for fast data storage and transfer.

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