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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category: Page 10

Aug 8, 2020

New reconfigurable circuits for a wide range of applications

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

Electronic components that can process information with high levels of efficiency are crucial for the development of most contemporary devices and computational tools. Reconfigurable electronics, flexible systems that can change configurations to best utilize available hardware resources, are a possible solution for enhancing processing efficiency.

Researchers at Nanjing University and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan have recently designed new reconfigurable circuits with advanced shape-morphing and information processing capabilities. These logic and neuromorphic circuits, presented in a paper published in Nature Electronics, were fabricated using 2-D tungsten diselenide, an commonly used in the development of electronics.

“Current mainstream reconfigurable circuits (such as the field programmable gate array, FPGA) are based on traditional silicon circuits, using P-type or N-type field effect transistors with ‘fixed’ electrical characteristics,” Feng Miao, the researcher who led the study, told TechXplore. “For example, PN junction is always reverse-biased, and varying the drain polarity does not add new switching functionalities. Thus, these reconfigurable circuits need to use a lot of transistor resources to build complex circuit structures and eventually realize reconfigurable computing capabilities at the circuit level.”

Aug 5, 2020

Matchbox-sized Motor Yields 500,000 RPM

Posted by in categories: electronics, energy

Circa 2006


Aiming to create a miniature motor capable of 1 million revolutions per minute, electronics researchers at ETH Life in Zurich are half-way to their goal.

The gas turbine-powered device produces force equivalent to 100 watts and is 95 percent fuel efficient, and gets 10 hours of operation out of the tank.

Continue reading “Matchbox-sized Motor Yields 500,000 RPM” »

Aug 3, 2020

CNO fusion neutrinos from the sun observed for the first time

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

A team of researchers working on the Borexino project has announced that they have observed carbon/nitrogen/oxygen (CNO) fusion neutrinos from the sun for the first time. Co-spokesman for the group, Gioacchino Ranucci, a physicist at the University of Milan, announced the observation at this year’s virtual Neutrino 2020 conference.

The Borexino solar-neutrino project is an experiment being conducted underground at Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy—it has been in operation since 2007. Its mission is to observe neutrinos that are emitted from the sun via two kinds of fusion reactions. The laboratory is located beneath a kilometer of rock to filter noise. Inside, it houses a huge balloon made of nylon and filled with 278 tonnes of liquid hydrocarbons surrounded by water in a tank. The temperature inside the tank is kept constant by heat exchangers and a blanket cover. Photon sensors line the tank. Neutrinos can be observed when they collide with electrons inside the balloon, creating a tiny flash. The researchers determine the characteristics of the flashes, information that can be used to isolate their source.

Researchers on the project observed neutrinos from a type of fusion reaction called a proton-proton chain back in 2012—they are believed to represent 99 percent of the energy released from the sun. Spotting neutrinos produced during CNO reactions has presented more of a challenge because there are far fewer of them. In both cases, hydrogen is fused into helium. The elements that are part of the reaction are referred to as chains because they allow such reactions to proceed. In his presentation, Ranucci, claimed that the team had “…unraveled the two processes powering the sun.”

Aug 1, 2020

XCY Squeezes a 4K-Capable Desktop PC Into a 2.4-Inch Case

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

If you’re on the look out for a desktop PC that’s small enough to sit under a TV, Chinese brand XCY has a very small computer they’d like to sell you.

As Liliputing reports, the XCY X51 is about as small as you could possibly make a fully-featured desktop PC. It measures 2.4-by-2.4-by-1.7-inches and weighs a mere 121 grams. However, inside you’ll find a quad-core Intel Celeron N4100 clocked at 1.1GHz (2.4Ghz burst frequency) complete with UHD Graphics 600 GPU. The processor is complemented by 8GB of 2,133MHz DDR4 RAM, a 128GB M.2 SSD, and a micro SD card slot for further storage expansion.

Continue reading “XCY Squeezes a 4K-Capable Desktop PC Into a 2.4-Inch Case” »

Aug 1, 2020

Researchers find crystals of indium selenide have exceptional flexibility

Posted by in categories: electronics, materials

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found that semiconducting crystals of indium selenide (InSe) have exceptional flexibility. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes testing samples of InSe and what they learned about the material. Xiaodong Han with Beijing University of Technology has published a Perspective piece outlining the work by the team in China in the same journal issue.

As the researchers note, most semiconductors are rigid, which means they are difficult to use in applications that require varied surfaces or bending. This has presented a problem for portable device makers as they attempt to respond to user demand for bendable electronics. In this new effort, the researchers in China have found one semiconductor, InSe, that is not only flexible, but is so pliable that it can be processed using rollers.

InSe, as its name implies, is a compound made from indium (a metal element often used in touchscreens) and selenium (a non-metal element). Selenium is also a 2-D semiconductor, and has come under scrutiny after researchers discovered that its bandgap matched the visible region in the electromagnetic spectrum. It has previously been studied for use in specialty optoelectronic applications. In this new effort, the researchers looked into the possibility of using it as a in bendable portable electronic devices.

Jul 30, 2020

CES, the world’s largest tech conference, will be online-only in 2021

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES), long the world’s largest tech trade show, will be all-digital in January 2021, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) announced on Monday. The CTA cited the COVID-19 pandemic and concerns about the spread of the virus as its reasoning for canceling the in-person event.

CES usually takes place in Las Vegas and involves many large gatherings in tightly packed convention halls, as well as smaller meetings between retailers, manufacturers, and other industry professionals.

Per the CTA, the digital CES will be a “new immersive experience.” The organization did not provide many details about what the online event will look like, but it claims it will be “highly personalized.” The organization still plans to hold CES 2022 in Las Vegas.

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Jul 20, 2020

New Spin Record Set: 1 Million rpm

Posted by in categories: electronics, energy

Circa 2008


Industrial motors can spin at a head-spinning 250,000 revolutions per minute. But a new matchbook-sized motor runs circles around the competition.

Researchers from ETH Zurich’s Department of Power Electronics created a drive system in cooperation with its industrial partners that exceeded 1,000,000 rpm in tests.

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Jul 19, 2020

A giant underground motion sensor in Germany tracks Earth’s wobbles

Posted by in category: electronics

A giant underground gyroscope array has taken its first measurements of how the world goes ’round.

Jul 18, 2020

Beetle-mounted camera streams insect adventures

Posted by in categories: electronics, mobile phones

👽 New beetle

Fyodor R.


Researchers have developed a tiny wireless camera that is light enough to be carried by live beetles.

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Jul 14, 2020

Google’s secretive ATAP lab is imagining the future of smart devices

Posted by in categories: electronics, futurism

The consumer-electronics research arm has been quiet for years—but it’s also been busy. Its new mission: Make Google hardware as smart as Google software.

Adidas GMR, a smart insole for soccer players, is powered by Google ATAP’s Jacquard technology. [Photo: courtesy of Google].

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