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Archive for the ‘education’ category: Page 9

Dec 2, 2023

The first results from the world’s biggest basic income experiment

Posted by in categories: business, economics, education, finance

One of the big questions GiveDirectly is trying to answer is how to direct cash to low-income households. “Just give cash” is a fun thing to say, but it elides some important operational details. It matters whether someone gets $20 a month for two years or $480 all at once. Those add up to the same amount of money; this isn’t a Side Hustle King situation. But how you get the money still matters. A certain $20 every month can help you budget and take care of regular expenses, while $480 all at once can give you enough capital to start a business or another big project.

The latest research on the GiveDirectly pilot, done by MIT economists Tavneet Suri and Nobel Prize winner Abhijit Banerjee, compares three groups: short-term basic income recipients (who got the $20 payments for two years), long-term basic income recipients (who get the money for the full 12 years), and lump sum recipients, who got $500 all at once, or roughly the same amount as the short-term basic income group. The paper is still being finalized, but Suri and Banerjee shared some results on a call with reporters this week.

By almost every financial metric, the lump sum group did better than the monthly payment group. Suri and Banerjee found that the lump sum group earned more, started more businesses, and spent more on education than the monthly group. “You end up seeing a doubling of net revenues” — or profits from small businesses — in the lump sum group, Suri said. The effects were about half that for the short-term $20-a-month group.

Nov 30, 2023

Coal-producing West Virginia is converting an entire school system to solar power

Posted by in categories: climatology, education, employment, health, law

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — An entire county school system in coal-producing West Virginia is going solar, representing what a developer and U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin’s office touted on Wednesday as the biggest-ever single demonstration of sun-powered renewable electricity in Appalachian public schools.

The agreement between Wayne County Schools and West Virginian solar installer and developer Solar Holler builds on historic investments in coal communities made possible by the Inflation Reduction Act, which Democratic Sen. Manchin had a major role in shaping as chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

Manchin, who announced this month that he wouldn’t run for reelection in the deep-red state, citing an increasingly polarized political system, was quick Wednesday to tout U.S. President Joe Biden’s 2022 landmark climate, health and tax law, which placed special emphasis on creating new clean energy jobs.

Nov 29, 2023

Seratech bakes bricks overnight using CO2 captured from factories

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, sustainability

To commercialize the carbon-neutral bricks, Seratech is working together with a team of architects at London-based Carmody Groarke.


Saratech.

The brick is a product of 18 months of research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Higher Education Innovation Fund (HEIF).

Nov 28, 2023

Finally! A Fun Way to Learn Quantum Computing with QCTRL’s Black Opal

Posted by in categories: computing, education, quantum physics

Learn about quantum computing with Q-CTRL’s Black Opal!

Today, I’m diving into the interactive platform of Q-CTRL’s Black Opal to simplify quantum concepts and demonstrate quantum computing applications. This video is perfect for both beginners curious about quantum computing and seasoned professionals seeking looking for a broad overview of quantum computing applications.

Continue reading “Finally! A Fun Way to Learn Quantum Computing with QCTRL’s Black Opal” »

Nov 28, 2023

Contrary to reports, OpenAI probably isn’t building humanity-threatening AI

Posted by in categories: education, mathematics, robotics/AI

Has OpenAI invented an AI technology with the potential to “threaten humanity”? From some of the recent headlines, you might be inclined to think so.

Reuters and The Information first reported last week that several OpenAI staff members had, in a letter to the AI startup’s board of directors, flagged the “prowess” and “potential danger” of an internal research project known as “Q*.” This AI project, according to the reporting, could solve certain math problems — albeit only at grade-school level — but had in the researchers’ opinion a chance of building toward an elusive technical breakthrough.

Continue reading “Contrary to reports, OpenAI probably isn’t building humanity-threatening AI” »

Nov 27, 2023

As the ISS turns 25, a look back at the space laboratory’s legacy

Posted by in categories: education, space

The ISS just celebrated its 25th anniversary — soon, the station will be hanging up its boots.

Nov 27, 2023

Unpacking the hype around OpenAI’s rumored new Q* model

Posted by in categories: education, mathematics, robotics/AI

If OpenAI’s new model can solve grade-school math, it could pave the way for more powerful systems.

Ever since last week’s dramatic events at OpenAI, the rumor mill has been in overdrive about why the company’s chief scientific officer, Ilya Sutskever, and its board decided to oust CEO Sam Altman.

Nov 26, 2023

Improve Your Relationship with Attachment Education & Communication Skills

Posted by in category: education

Educating couples on attachment and teaching communication skills can significantly improve their relationship Questions to inspire discussions Why is most couples therapy ineffective? —Most couples therapy is ineffective because one partner often uses it as a way to air their frustrations and try to fix the other, leading to a miserable experience for all involved.

Nov 24, 2023

Simulating the Cosmos: Is a Miniature Universe Possible?

Posted by in categories: computing, education, physics, space

Wouldn’t it be nice to have a computer answer all of the biggest questions in the universe?

In his first year of graduate school, in 2013, Michael Wagman walked into his advisor’s office and asked, “Can you help me simulate the universe?”

Wagman, a theoretical physicist and associate scientist at the US Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, thought it seemed like a reasonable question to ask. “We have all of these beautiful theoretical descriptions of how we think the world works, so I wanted to try and connect those formal laws of physics to my everyday experience of reality,” he says.

Nov 24, 2023

Heatherwick Studio unveils undulating mixed-use district in Tokyo

Posted by in categories: education, space travel

Aiming to create a city district that provides access to nature and a diversity of spaces, Heatherwick Studio designed Azabudai Hills to contain residential buildings, retail and restaurant spaces, a school, two temples, art galleries, offices and 24,000 square metres of public green space.

The 81,000-square-metre-development was informed by timber pergola structures with a gridded roof structure that extends like hilltops to create curving forms extending to ground level.

Heatherwick Studio added trees, flowers and meandering routes between the building and on the sloping roofs, aiming to create spaces that invite exploration and encourage social gatherings.

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