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Archive for the ‘biological’ category: Page 16

Jan 7, 2019

“Bionic Mushrooms” Fuse Nanotech, Bacteria and Fungi

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biological, cyborgs, engineering, nanotechnology, transhumanism

(Hoboken, N.J. — Nov. 7, 2018) — In their latest feat of engineering, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have taken an ordinary white button mushroom from a grocery store and made it bionic, supercharging it with 3D-printed clusters of cyanobacteria that generate electricity and swirls of graphene nanoribbons that can collect the current.

The work, reported in the Nov. 7 issue of Nano Letters, may sound like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but the hybrids are part of a broader effort to better improve our understanding of cells biological machinery and how to use those intricate molecular gears and levers to fabricate new technologies and useful systems for defense, healthcare and the environment.

“In this case, our system – this bionic mushroom — produces electricity,” said Manu Mannoor, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stevens. “By integrating cyanobacteria that can produce electricity, with nanoscale materials capable of collecting the current, we were able to better access the unique properties of both, augment them, and create an entirely new functional bionic system.”

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Jan 5, 2019

Synthetic organisms are about to challenge what ‘alive’ really means

Posted by in categories: evolution, space

And there will be increasing pressures to continue this research. We may need to accelerate the evolution of terrestrial life forms, for example, including homo sapiens, so that they carry traits and capabilities needed for life in space or even on our own changing planet.

All of this will bring up serious issues as to how we see ourselves – and behave – as a species. While the creation of multicellular organisms that are capable of sexual reproduction is still a long way off, in 2019 we will need to begin a serious debate about whether artificially evolved humans are our future, and if we should put an end to these experiments before it is too late.

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Jan 4, 2019

Bottom-up biology

Posted by in category: biological

Researchers are tearing up the biology rule books by trying to construct cells from scratch. A special issue explores the lessons being learnt about life. Researchers are tearing up the biology rule books by trying to construct cells from scratch. A special issue explores the lessons being learnt about life.

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Dec 30, 2018

We Have a New Understanding of the Rarest Symbiotic Relationship in Nature

Posted by in category: biological

Scientists have uncovered the mechanisms between the world’s first known invertebrate endosymbiotic relationship between an algae and a type of salamander.

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Dec 28, 2018

Ira Pastor — Authority Magazine — Bioquark Inc.

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, business, cryonics, DNA, health, life extension, science

Thanks to Authority Magazine and Fotis Georgiadis for the interview — Bioquark inc. (http://www.bioquark.com) — Regeneration, Disease Reversion, Age Rejuvenation — https://medium.com/authority-magazine/the-future-is-now-we-a…cc6dc8ebf1

Dec 24, 2018

Should We Replace Ourselves? | Zoltan Istvan vs. JFG, TPS #257

Posted by in categories: biological, genetics, internet, life extension, transhumanism

I was in a really interesting 1-hour debate yesterday with Jean-Francois Gariépy who runs a well-known YouTube channel The Public Space, sometimes associated with the Alt-Right. We discussed #transhumanism. I think the debate caught a lot of people by surprise. While I believe in and embrace total diversity, I despise the oppression of human biology and death, and advocate for any means possible to overcome it—including genetic modification and merging with machines. The debate makes me look like the aggressor. But it only proves what I’ve always said, that issues of race and traditional cultural bigotry are minor compared to the issues of humanity battling aging and death itself. All of us are currently in a war to not die:


An important debate on whether or not humanity should play with their own genes. Guest: Zoltan Istvan, transhumanist.

Continue reading “Should We Replace Ourselves? | Zoltan Istvan vs. JFG, TPS #257” »

Dec 24, 2018

Bioquark Inc — Ectocrine Technologies — Mosquitos — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, business, chemistry, disruptive technology, genetics, health, life extension

New program coming on-line at Bioquark Inc. (www.bioquark.com) — Ectocrine interactions (the“Ectocrinome”) represents a completely unexplored area related to human health

https://www.prweb.com/releases/bioquark_inc_and_ectocrine_te…004155.htm


Dec 20, 2018

Earth’s mysterious ‘deep biosphere’ may harbor millions of undiscovered species

Posted by in category: biological

Scientists say the underground ecosystems are a “subterranean Galapagos” just waiting to be studied.

This unidentified nematode from the Kopanang gold mine in South Africa lives 1.4 kilometers below the surface. Gaetan Borgonie / Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium.

Continue reading “Earth’s mysterious ‘deep biosphere’ may harbor millions of undiscovered species” »

Dec 19, 2018

A Bug-Like Robot Uses Electricity to Walk Upside Down

Posted by in categories: biological, robotics/AI

A bug’s life doesn’t seem half bad, if you can overlook the super-short lifespan or the threat of getting eaten by lizards or swatted at by humans. Flying is nice, as is being able to walk on ceilings. The versatility is enviable, which is why roboticists are on a quest to imbue machines with the power of the bug.

But to harness the powers of nature, roboticists are resorting to very un-biological means. The latest insect-inspired robot tackles the problem of walking upside down using not glue, or a material that mimics the pad of a gecko’s foot as past bot builders have done, but electricity. Specifically, electroadhesion.

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Dec 18, 2018

Scientists develop method to visualize a genetic mutation

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

A team of scientists has developed a method that yields, for the first time, visualization of a gene amplifications and deletions known as copy number variants in single cells.

Significantly, the breakthrough, reported in the journal PLoS Biology, allows early detection of rare genetic events providing high resolution analysis of the tempo of evolution. The method may provide a new way of studying mutations in pathogens and .

“Evolution and disease are driven by mutational events in DNA,” explains David Gresham, an associate professor in New York University’s Department of Biology and the study’s senior author. “However, in populations of these events currently cannot be identified until many cells contain the same mutation. Our method detects these rare events right after they have happened, allowing us to follow their trajectory as the population evolves.”

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