Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 117

Jan 11, 2017

Synthetic biology could combat the aging process

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, life extension

The Cellage synthetic biology digest.


The field of synthetic biology holds the potential to treat a variety of aging processes and treat age-related diseases. Synthetic biology allows biologists to create new functions in cells by creating synthetic cellular programs and could allow us to combat age-related diseases in ways never before considered.

#aging #crowdfundthecure

Continue reading “Synthetic biology could combat the aging process” »

Jan 9, 2017

How CRISPR gene editing puts scientists in the driver’s seat of evolution

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, evolution

CRISPR can help us end many diseases and guide evolution and is probably one of the most powerful tools we have recently added to our toolkit.


Imagine you could edit a mouse’s genes to be resistant to Lyme Disease. The mouse would breed and evolution would take its course, leading to the extinction of the disease. That’s the vision for scientists developing CRISPR, technology that allows scientists to rewrite the code of life. William Brangham talks to Michael Specter who wrote about CRISPR for The New Yorker.

Read more

Jan 5, 2017

Synthego bags $41M to grow CRISPR synthetic RNA kit biz

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, robotics/AI

Nice.


Synthetic RNA kit business Synthego has raised $41 million to step up its efforts to make CRISPR gene editing easier and more accurate. The West Coast startup relied heavily on tech VCs for the cash, but also gained validation from having CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna invest in its business.

Redwood City, CA-based Synthego exited stealth in August, four years after it was set up by two former SpaceX computer engineers. In those early years, which were bankrolled by an $8.3 million investment in 2013, Synthego established an automated manufacturing process for guide RNA products that it thinks sets it apart from larger competitors in terms of cost, turnaround time and editing efficiency.

Continue reading “Synthego bags $41M to grow CRISPR synthetic RNA kit biz” »

Jan 5, 2017

The Quest To Bring Biodesign To The Masses

Posted by in category: bioengineering

At Ginkgo Bioworks, biodesign is modeled after software design. And with $150 million in funding, it’s already scaling like a tech company.

Read more

Jan 4, 2017

Gene Editing Can Now Change An Entire Species Forever

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

In Brief CRISPR has opened up limitless avenues for genetic modification. From disease prevention to invasive species control, Jennifer Kahn discusses the discover, application, and implications of gene drives.

Jennifer Kahn, a science journalist for the New York Times, recently did a TED Talk in which she discussed the discovery, application, and implications of a CRISPR gene drive used to make mosquitoes resistant to malaria and other diseases like chikungunya, and Zika.

Continue reading “Gene Editing Can Now Change An Entire Species Forever” »

Jan 4, 2017

Real ‘Jurassic World’ Scientist Says We Could Bring Back Dinosaurs As Pets

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, entertainment

Paleontologist Jack Horner participates in a “Jurassic World” Q&A at the Natural History Museum.

Here at Popular Science, we can’t wait to see Jurassic World, which opens in theaters nationwide today. I mean, who can resist velociraptor biker gangs:

But we were also curious about the real scientific research that inspired the movie. So we talked with Jack Horner, a noted paleontologist who has consulted on the entire Jurassic Park movie franchise, including Jurassic World.

Continue reading “Real ‘Jurassic World’ Scientist Says We Could Bring Back Dinosaurs As Pets” »

Jan 3, 2017

Jurassic Farm: Scientists Are Planning to Resurrect an Extinct Cattle Species

Posted by in category: bioengineering

In Brief

  • The Rewilding Europe project seeks to bring back an extinct cattle species called aurochs which inhabited the wilds of Europe and Asia until 1627.
  • Using back breeding, scientists think in about seven to 10 years we will have a stabilized group of cattle, which will help shape the European landscape.

Read more

Jan 2, 2017

Amino Labs present the Amino

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, education

Amino is a bioengineering platform that allows anyone to learn and create with synthetic biology and bioengineering, at home, school or in the lab!

Find us on Indiegogo http://igg.me/at/amino

Continue reading “Amino Labs present the Amino” »

Jan 2, 2017

America’s refusal to embrace gene editing could start the next Cold War

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, cyborgs, employment, genetics, military, neuroscience, transhumanism

New version of this out: https://www.geneticliteracyproject.org/2017/01/02/americas-r…-cold-war/ #transhumanism #biohacking


Unlike other epic scientific advances…the immediate effect of genetic editing technology is not dangerous. Yet, it stands to be just as divisive to humans as the 70-year proliferation of nuclear weaponry.

The playing field of geopolitics is pretty simple: If China or another country vows to increase its children’s intelligence via genetic editing, and America chooses to remain “au naturel” because they insist that’s how God made them, a conflict species-deep will quickly arise.

Continue reading “America’s refusal to embrace gene editing could start the next Cold War” »

Dec 31, 2016

Genetic researchers discover ‘stop’ button for CRISPR gene editing tool

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Researchers have discovered a technique that could block the effects of a powerful gene-editing tool to protect adjacent genes against accidental alteration. The breakthrough could be the beginning of a major step forward for genetic engineering.

Scientists at the University of California (UC) in San Francisco researchers have discovered how to switch off the effects of the CRISPR gene editing system. CRISPR has been a major advance for gene editing, but there are difficulties in limiting its effects on adjacent genes. So far this has militated against its use in research, most obviously, into the human genome.

Read more