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Nov 8, 2018

How science fared in the midterm elections

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, government, science

This year, more candidates with degrees in science, medicine and engineering ran for Congress than ever before. Of the nearly two-dozen new candidates in this crop, at least seven won seats in the House of Representatives.


This year, scientists, doctors and engineers ran for office like never before. Here’s how they did.

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Nov 8, 2018

Coffee is so good for you that it might curb your risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, neuroscience

We as human have to live with a lot of unfortunate realities, including the fact that a lot of the things we love end up being bad for us. We all know by now that if we binge on tasty treats too much we’ll end up eating ourselves into an early grave, but in recent years it’s become increasingly clear that coffee, a well known vice of millions and millions of people, is actually pretty good for you.

Recent studies have shown that being a regular coffee drinker can reduce your risk of all kinds of ailments, including heart attack and stroke. Now, a new research effort reveals that dark roast coffee is particularly good at warding off some nasty brain conditions, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

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Nov 8, 2018

Ripples in Space-Time Could Reveal the Shape of Wormholes

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Wormholes — yawning gateways that could theoretically connect distant points in space-time — are usually illustrated as gaping gravity wells linked by a narrow tunnel.

But their precise shape has been unknown.

Now, however, a physicist in Russia has devised a method to measure the shape of symmetric wormholes — even though they have not been proven to exist — based on the way the objects may affect light and gravity. [8 Ways You Can See Einstein’s Theory of Relativity in Real Life].

Continue reading “Ripples in Space-Time Could Reveal the Shape of Wormholes” »

Nov 7, 2018

Object detection in 4K and 8K video using GPUs

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have recently developed a new model that enables fast and accurate object detection in high-resolution 4K and 8K video footage using GPUs. Their attention pipeline method carries out a two-stage evaluation of every image or video frame under rough and refined resolution, limiting the total number of evaluations necessary.

In recent years, machine learning has attained remarkable results in computer vision tasks, including . However, most recognition models typically perform best on images with a relatively low resolution. As the resolution of recording devices is rapidly improving, there is a rising need for tools that can process data.

Continue reading “Object detection in 4K and 8K video using GPUs” »

Nov 7, 2018

When Galaxies Merge, The Black Holes In Their Hearts Fuse Together

Posted by in categories: cosmology, futurism

Yeah, it sounds goth, but it could explain the enormous size of certain black holes.


In the distant future, our own galaxy could join hearts with its galactic neighbor Andromeda.

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Nov 7, 2018

Earth has two extra, hidden ‘moons’

Posted by in categories: futurism, space travel

First spied in the 1960s, the huge dust clouds have now been confirmed—and may affect plans for future space exploration.

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Nov 7, 2018

Parker Solar Probe Reports Good Status After Close Solar Approach

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

#ParkerSolarProbe


Parker Solar Probe is alive and well after skimming by the Sun at just 15 million miles from our star’s surface. This is far closer than any spacecraft has ever gone — the previous record was set by Helios B in 1976 and broken by Parker on Oct. 29 — and this maneuver has exposed the spacecraft to intense heat and solar radiation in a complex solar wind environment.

Continue reading “Parker Solar Probe Reports Good Status After Close Solar Approach” »

Nov 7, 2018

NASA Wants To Probe Uranus In Search Of Gas

Posted by in category: space

We hear a lot about Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, and that’s because we have extremely fancy hardware floating around and, in some cases, cruising on the surface of those planets. The planets that lie further away from the Sun don’t get nearly as much attention, but they may soon, as NASA is currently spitballing some missions that will give us a better look at Uranus than we’ve ever gotten.

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Nov 7, 2018

Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica

Posted by in category: futurism

These maps sketch out the remnants of long-lost landmasses trapped within drifting continental plates called cratons. While some cratons are already well-understood, Antarctica’s lithospheric structure is tough to examine because of its remote location and the enormous ice sheets that obscure its underlying geology.

“These gravity images are revolutionizing our ability to study the least understood continent on Earth—Antarctica,” said study co-author Fausto Ferraccioli, science leader of geology and Geophysics at the British Antarctic Survey, in a statement. “In East Antarctica, we see an exciting mosaic of geological features that reveal fundamental similarities and differences between the crust beneath Antarctica and other continents it was joined to until 160 million years ago.”

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Nov 7, 2018

This 13-year-old scientist invented a safer way to treat pancreatic cancer, and he hasn’t even started high school yet

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education

13-year-old Rishab Jain won the 2018 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge for making a tool to help treat pancreatic cancer more safely.

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