Menu

Blog

Page 8159

Jan 16, 2019

Unintended side effects: antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiome dysregulates skeletal health

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Microbes are often seen as pathogens that cause disease and antibiotics have been used successfully to combat these foreign invaders. In reality, the picture is more complex. Most of the time we live in harmony with our commensal gut microbiota, which is the collection of microorganisms colonizing the healthy gut. Commensal bacteria regulate host biological functions, including skeletal health. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) studying osteoimmunology, the interface of the skeletal and immune systems, have examined the impact of disrupting the healthy gut microbiome with antibiotics on post-pubertal skeletal development. Their results, published online on the January 16, 2019 in the American Journal of Pathology, showed that antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiota induced a pro-inflammatory response that led to increased activity of osteoclasts.

“This report introduces antibiotics as a critical exogenous modulator of gut microbiota osteoimmune response during post-pubertal skeletal development,” says Chad M. Novince, D.D.S., Ph.D., assistant professor in both the Colleges of Medicine and Dental Medicine who studies the impact of the microbiome on osteoimmunology and skeletal development. “People have shown that antibiotics perturb the microbiota, but this is the first known study evaluating how that has downstream effects on immune cells that regulate bone cells and the overall skeletal phenotype. This work brings the whole story together.”

The post-pubertal phase of development is a critical window of plasticity that supports the accrual of approximately 40 percent of our peak bone-mass. Recent work by the Novince lab and others has shown that the gut microbiota contributes to skeletal health. To determine the impact of antibiotic perturbation of the gut microbiota in post-pubertal skeletal development, Novince worked with team members at MUSC and treated mice with a cocktail of three antibiotics. In collaboration with microbiome scientist Alexander V. Alekseyenko, Ph.D., associate professor in the Biomedical Informatics Center and founding director of the MUSC Program for Human Microbiome Research, they were able to show that antibiotic treatment led to major alterations in the gut microbiota, resulting in specific changes to large groups of bacteria.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

This Car Runs For 100 Years Without Refuelling – The Thorium Car

Posted by in category: transportation

If you have a car that is powered by Thorium, you would never need to refuel it, because the vehicle would probably burn out long before the chemical did. The Thorium can last for so long, in fact, that it would probably outlive you.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

If Yellowstone erupts where should I go? What will happen?

Posted by in category: futurism

What’s the solution to this problem?


Did you know that the Yellowstone supervolcano could erupt at any time causing death, destruction, chaos, and possibly even a nuclear winter that could wipe out a good number of the inhabitants of planet earth? If it does, where would you go?

By Shepard Ambellas

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Our Language Affects What We See

Posted by in category: futurism

A new look at “the Russian Blues” demonstrates the power of words to shape perception.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

A Floating Glass Bead Could Help Physicists Probe the Unknown

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

New tabletop sensors could be sensitive enough to glimpse gravitational waves and even dark matter particles.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Forget Darwinian Evolution. Humanity May Soon Evolve Itself Through A.I.

Posted by in categories: biological, Peter Diamandis, robotics/AI

Are we poised to witness the evolution of evolution itself? In the following interview, expert Peter Diamandis predicts not only will humanity soon transcend its current biological limits, our world will become automated and magical, responding to our deepest desires and inner thoughts.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Researchers Create Perfect Blood Vessels in a Petri Dish for the First Time

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

The researchers also demonstrated that it is possible to grow functioning human blood vessels in another species.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Antibiotics are still massively overprescribed, a new study shows. With no new drugs in sight, some scientists are turning to Crispr for a reboot.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Scientists Claim They Can Predict Your Lifespan From Your DNA

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

As soon as you’re born, they can predict when you’re likely to die.


They just need to look at 12 parts of your genome.

Read more

Jan 16, 2019

Scientists grow perfect human blood vessels in a petri dish

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

The breakthrough engineering technology, outlined in a new study published today in Nature, dramatically advances research of vascular diseases like diabetes, identifying a key pathway to potentially prevent changes to blood vessels — a major cause of death and morbidity among those with diabetes.

An organoid is a three-dimensional structure grown from stem cells that mimics an organ and can be used to study aspects of that organ in a petri dish.

“Being able to build human blood vessels as organoids from stem cells is a game changer,” said the study’s senior author Josef Penninger, the Canada 150 Research Chair in Functional Genetics, director of the Life Sciences Institute at UBC and founding director of the Institute for Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA).

Read more