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Apr 18, 2019

Microsoft Issues Serious Windows 10 Update Warning

Posted by in category: computing

So yes, Microsoft may (at long last) be redesigning Windows 10 updates in a more responsible manner. But allowing users to block dangerous updates is just one part of the solution. Not sending dangerous updates to users computers every few months seems equally important to me.

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Apr 18, 2019

Morphing origami takes a new shape, expanding use possibilities

Posted by in category: drones

Origami-based structures have been used to create deployable solar arrays for space, adaptable acoustic systems for symphony halls and even crash protection systems for flying drones.

Now researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a new type of that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics.

The research, which was supported by the National Science Foundation and is to be published April 19 in the journal Physical Review Letters, could unlock new types of origami-based structures or metamaterials that leverage the characteristics of two types of origami.

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Apr 18, 2019

Organs on a Chip Experiments Will Investigate the High Rate of Infections in Astronauts

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, space travel

On April 25, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch cargo to the space station and two organs-on-a-chip experiments designed by University of Pennsylvania scientists. They want to understand why so many astronauts get infections while in space. NASA has reported that 15 of the 29 Apollo astronauts had bacterial or viral infections. Between 1989 and 1999, more than 26 space shuttle astronauts had infections.

Huh and his team have created two separate experiments for this first launch. The first essentially mimics an infection inside a human airway, to see what happens to the bacteria, and the surrounding cells, in orbit. Huh’s BIOLines lab created the actual chips.

A lung chip is made of a polymer, and a permeable membrane is the platform for the human cells. For the lung-on-a-chip, one side of the membrane is coated with lung cells, to process the air, and capillary cells on the other, to provide the blood flow. The membrane is stretched and released to provide the bellows-like effect of real lungs.

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Apr 18, 2019

‘Bubble Boys’ Cured in Medical Breakthrough Using Gene Therapy

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, innovation

St. Jude researchers license technology to Mustang Bio in hopes of bringing treatment to market.

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Apr 18, 2019

Scientists have detected the earliest Big Bang molecule in space

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

When the universe formed during the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, the chemical reactions of the aftermath formed the first molecules. Those first molecules were crucial in helping form everything we know, but they’re also absent.

And although HeH+, the helium hydride ion, has been proposed for years as that first molecule, scientists couldn’t find any evidence of its existence in space — until now. The findings were published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

After the Big Bang, HeH+ formed in a molecular bond when helium atoms and protons combined. Later, these would break apart into hydrogen molecules and helium atoms. Both elements are the two most abundant throughout the universe, with hydrogen first and helium second.

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Apr 18, 2019

Could humans ever regenerate limbs?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Circa 2016


Just lopped off your ring finger slicing carrots (some time in the future)? No problem. Just speed-read this article while you’re waiting for the dronebulance. …

“Epimorphic regeneration” — growing digits, maybe even limbs, with full 3D structure and functionality — may one day be possible. So say scientists at Tulane University, the University of Washington, and the University of Pittsburgh, writing in a review article just published in Tissue Engineering, Part B, Reviews (open access until March 8).

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Apr 18, 2019

Global Solid State Refrigerator Market 2019 Major Growth

Posted by in category: innovation

The global “Solid State Refrigerator” market is amongst the most encouraging markets. This global Solid State Refrigerator market is escalating at higher rates in terms of growth and development of innovative techniques on mounting customer selection. The Solid State Refrigerator market offers a vast stage for contenders Tellurex Corporation, Beijing Huimao Cooling Equipment Co., Ltd., Hicooltec, Thermion, Merit Technology Group, TE Technology, II-VI Incorporated, RMT Ltd., Micropelt, Laird, Custom Thermoelectric Inc., Phononic, Inc., Komatsu, Kreazone serving with great opportunities for expansion.

Free Request Sample is Available Solid State Refrigerator Market Report @ www.marketresearchstore.com/report/global-solid-state-refrig…uestSample

Also, the global Solid State Refrigerator report offers forecast details assumed with the support of an appropriate set of assumptions and methodologies. The market report provides information on the global Solid State Refrigerator market relating to the geographical region. Moreover, the Solid State Refrigerator report also provides brief information about the leading key players at a global level, which precisely includes industry profiles, market shareholdings, product features, and trade.

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Apr 18, 2019

Quantum sensors to make Australia safer

Posted by in categories: military, quantum physics

Now, almost 100 years later, the Department of Defence, through its Next Generation Technology Fund, has selected 11 projects that exploit the extraordinary properties of quantum mechanics to deliver improved security for Australians. The Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) at the University of Adelaide is involved in four of these ambitious projects.

IPAS will work closely with the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group on four ambitious quantum technology projects. Three of the four projects focus on quantum detection.

One project explores whether ‘quantum’ radar can be used to detect stealth aircraft.

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Apr 18, 2019

Quantum radar to detect objects which are invisible to conventional systems

Posted by in category: quantum physics

A prototype quantum radar that has the potential to detect objects which are invisible to conventional systems has been developed by an international research team led by a quantum information scientist at the University of York.

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Apr 18, 2019

Novel antibody may suppress HIV for up to four months

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, according to a report published online today in The New England Journal of Medicine. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-421, was safe and did not induce the production of antibody-resistant HIV. The study was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a component of the National Institutes of Health, and United Biopharma, Inc.

The study was conducted in Taiwan and led by Chang Yi Wang, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer and Chairperson of United BioPharma, Inc. Twenty-nine volunteers with well-controlled HIV discontinued their normal regimens of daily oral ART at the time of their first or one week later, depending on their ART regimen. Fourteen received eight regular weekly infusions of UB-421, while 15 received eight higher-dose infusions every other week. At the end of the 8- or 16-week treatment period, all volunteers restarted their previous ART regimen and were evaluated in follow-up visits up to eight weeks later. Apart from a single participant who discontinued the study because of a mild skin rash, volunteers in both groups maintained HIV suppression (plasma HIV RNA levels under 20 copies/mL) throughout the treatment period in the absence of ART.

Previous experimental infusions of broadly neutralizing antibodies, or bNAbs, have suppressed HIV for about two weeks by targeting proteins on the virus itself, but the rapid mutation rate of HIV induces antibody-resistant strains that render the treatment ineffective. UB-421 theoretically avoids this possibility by blocking a stable human protein that HIV uses to infect T cells. Indeed, resistance to UB-421 was not seen in this study. Because the small study did not include a comparator group receiving a placebo infusion, further studies have been planned in Taiwan and Thailand to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UB-421 as a treatment for HIV. In a related study, NIAID investigators currently are evaluating the safety of regular infusions of two highly potent bNAbs that may prevent the development of resistant HIV strains by targeting two distinct areas of the virus.

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