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Nov 20, 2019

Flexible organic electrodes built using water-processed silver nanowires

Posted by in categories: electronics, nanotechnology

Organic electronic devices, which are made of small molecules or polymers (i.e., substances composed primarily or completely of similar units bound together) are known to have several advantageous properties. In fact, organic electronics have relatively low production costs, they are easy to integrate with other systems and they enable good device flexibility.

Despite their advantages, most organic optoelectronics devices do not perform as well as devices built on rigid substrates. This is primarily due to the lack of existing flexible electrodes that can simultaneously provide low resistance, high transparency and smooth surfaces.

With this in mind, researchers at Nankai University in China have recently set out to create new organic electrodes for flexible photovoltaics, devices that can be used to capture sunlight and convert it into electricity. The electrodes they developed, presented in a paper published in Nature Electronics, were built using water-processed silver nanowires and a polyelectrolyte.

Nov 20, 2019

Rejuvenation: If I could turn back time … — Longevity.Technology

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, existential risks, life extension, neuroscience

Last week, the BBC reported on the plight of axolotls in Mexico City, which are under threat of extinction. [1] The risk to these creatures is made doubly concerning when you consider their incredible ability to regenerate and apparent immunity to cancer, which is of great interest to scientists and companies working in the Longevity sector. One such company is Bioquark, a Philadelphia-based life sciences company that is working on the development of combinatorial biologics for the rejuvenation and repair of human organs and tissues. Among its clinical plans, it lists the development of therapeutic products for cancer reversion, organ repair and regeneration, and even brain death resuscitation. Nothing major then!

Bioquark has developed a novel combinatorial biologic called BQ-A, which mimics the regulatory biochemistry of the living human egg (oocyte) immediately following fertilization. While ooplasm-based reprogramming has been studied in experiments such as in-vitro fertilization and cloning, Bioquark claims it is the first company to apply it to somatic tissue in mammals.

We spoke with Bioquark’s CEO, Ira Pastor, a 30-year veteran of the pharmaceutical industry, to find out more about the company and where it’s headed.

Nov 20, 2019

Special immune cells found in people aged 110+ are rare in the young

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Statistically, it’s unlikely that most of us will ever reach our 110th birthday, so scientists are fascinated by those few that do. In a new study, researchers looked at the immune systems of people who have hit the milestone, and found that they have a high number of a particular type of immune cell that’s rare even in healthy, younger people.

Even in our world of modern medicine, supercentenarians (people over the age of 110) are extremely rare, with estimates saying there are less than 1,000 such people worldwide. Perhaps not surprisingly, previous studies have shown that people who make it to 110 years old generally seem to avoid illnesses like cancer or infections throughout their whole lifetimes.

So for the new study, researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science (IMS) and Keio University set out to examine the immune systems of supercentenarians and compare them to younger people. They took over 40,000 cells from seven supercentenarian subjects, and about 20,000 cells from five control subjects, aged in their 50s to 80s.

Nov 20, 2019

Intermittent fasting increases longevity in cardiac catheterization patients

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics, life extension

While Intermittent fasting may sound like another dieting craze, the practice of routinely not eating and drinking for short periods of time has shown again to lead to potentially better health outcomes.

In a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have found that cardiac catheterization patients who practiced regular intermittent lived longer than patients who don’t. In addition, the study found that patients who practice intermittent fasting are less likely to be diagnosed with .

“It’s another example of how we’re finding that regularly fasting can lead to better health outcomes and longer lives,” said Benjamin Horne, Ph.D., principal investigator of the study and director of cardiovascular and genetic epidemiology at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute.

Nov 20, 2019

Dying Patients Placed In Suspended Animation So Doctors Can Operate

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have developed a technique to operate on dying patients by putting them in a state of suspended animation.

Nov 20, 2019

Vitamins for Stress: 7 Great Options

Posted by in category: health

I found several bloopers here how about you??? AEWR.


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While everyone has specific life stressors, factors related to job pressure, money, health, and relationships tend to be the most common.

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Nov 20, 2019

Dr. Keith Scott-Mumby, MD — Food Allergy Detective and Alternative Therapy Watchdog

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

You found the Chris Beat Cancer blog! I created this resource to help you heal or prevent cancer holistically. Welcome to the Chris Beat Cancer family!

Nov 20, 2019

You Can Make a Rocket Engine’s Entire Combustion Chamber in One 3D Print

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, space travel

Launcher says one-piece manufacture lowers the cost of its part, compared with those printed in pieces and joined. To do this, the Brooklyn-based startup teamed with 3D printer companies to build a space large enough for its entire copper-alloy part, which itself is a huge investment.

Nov 20, 2019

Space travel barrier removed as docs freeze and revive human for first time

Posted by in category: space travel

Process is initially intended to save lives on Earth, rather than to send astronauts on long haul flights.

Nov 20, 2019

The Ethical Implications of Mind-Machine Meld | Future You | NPR

Posted by in categories: computing, Elon Musk, neuroscience

The fast-moving development of brain-machine interfaces got a boost when Elon Musk announced the work for Neuralink, his new company devoted to implantable devices to enhance cognition and better marry our brains with super-computing. His competitor, fellow tech entrepreneur Bryan Johnson of Kernel, weighs in on why he thinks advancing cognition can solve all the other problems in the world. But tech ethicist Tristan Harris says not so fast — we haven’t properly accounted for what existing tech has already done to us. Think things through with this brainy episode of Future You with Elise Hu.

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Continue reading “The Ethical Implications of Mind-Machine Meld | Future You | NPR” »