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Jan 28, 2023

On the existence of a holographic description of the LHC quark–gluon plasmas

Posted by in categories: mathematics, particle physics

Year 2017 face_with_colon_three


A basic question [1] in the study of the gauge-gravity duality is this: which field theories have a gravity dual? In the case of applications to actual strongly coupled systems such as the Quark–Gluon Plasma [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], this question becomes: does every realistic strongly coupled system have such a dual? To settle this, one needs to examine the most extreme cases. The most extreme strongly-coupled systems currently accessible to experiment are probably (see below) the plasmas produced by collisions of heavy ions at the LHC [7], [8] ; so one needs to consider whether holography works in this case.

In [9] we adduced evidence suggesting that it does not. The problem is a very fundamental one: it appears that the purported gravity dual in some cases does not exist when one attempts to interpret it (as one ultimately must [10]) as a string-theoretic system.

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Jan 28, 2023

Memories Become Chaotic before They Are Forgotten

Posted by in categories: biological, mathematics, robotics/AI

A model for information storage in the brain reveals how memories decay with age.

Theoretical constructs called attractor networks provide a model for memory in the brain. A new study of such networks traces the route by which memories are stored and ultimately forgotten [1]. The mathematical model and simulations show that, as they age, memories recorded in patterns of neural activity become chaotic—impossible to predict—before disintegrating into random noise. Whether this behavior occurs in real brains remains to be seen, but the researchers propose looking for it by monitoring how neural activity changes over time in memory-retrieval tasks.

Memories in both artificial and biological neural networks are stored and retrieved as patterns in the way signals are passed among many nodes (neurons) in a network. In an artificial neural network, each node’s output value at any time is determined by the inputs it receives from the other nodes to which it’s connected. Analogously, the likelihood of a biological neuron “firing” (sending out an electrical pulse), as well as the frequency of firing, depends on its inputs. In another analogy with neurons, the links between nodes, which represent synapses, have “weights” that can amplify or reduce the signals they transmit. The weight of a given link is determined by the degree of synchronization of the two nodes that it connects and may be altered as new memories are stored.

Jan 27, 2023

Future of the Metaverse (2030 — 10,000 A.D.+)

Posted by in categories: biological, mathematics, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, singularity, virtual reality

This video covers the timelapse of metaverse technologies from 2030 to 3000+. Watch this next video about the Future of Virtual Reality (2030 – 3000+): https://bit.ly/3zfjybO.
► Support This Channel: https://www.patreon.com/futurebusinesstech.
► Udacity: Up To 75% Off All Courses (Biggest Discount Ever): https://bit.ly/3j9pIRZ
► Brilliant: Learn Science And Math Interactively (20% Off): https://bit.ly/3HAznLL
► Jasper AI: Write 5x Faster With Artificial Intelligence: https://bit.ly/3MIPSYp.

SOURCES:
https://www.futuretimeline.net.
• The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology (Ray Kurzweil): https://amzn.to/3ftOhXI

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Jan 27, 2023

Mars in 2050: 10 Future Technologies In The First Mars City

Posted by in categories: mathematics, robotics/AI, space

This video covers Mars in 2050 and 10 future technologies in the first Mars city. Watch this next video about the world in 2050: https://bit.ly/3J23hbQ.
► Support This Channel: https://www.patreon.com/futurebusinesstech.
► Udacity: Up To 75% Off All Courses (Biggest Discount Ever): https://bit.ly/3j9pIRZ
► Brilliant: Learn Science And Math Interactively (20% Off): https://bit.ly/3HAznLL
► Jasper AI: Write 5x Faster With Artificial Intelligence: https://bit.ly/3MIPSYp.

SOURCES:
https://scitechdaily.com/mars-settlement-likely-by-2050-says…-elon-musk.
https://www.news18.com/news/buzz/elon-musk-and-nasa-may-fina…79184.html.
https://2050.earth/predictions/a-sustainable-civilization-of-humans-on-mars.
https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-plans-1-million-pe…2020-1
https://www.inverse.com/innovation/spacex-mars-city-codex.
https://www.inverse.com/article/54358-elon-musk-explains-how…rs-by-2050
https://futurism.com/the-byte/elon-musk-million-people-mars-2050
https://www.lpi.usra.edu/V2050/presentations/Tuesday/6_8236_Ehlmann.pdf.
https://www.mars-one.com.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_Mars.
https://www.nationalgeographic.org/hires/human-settlement-mars/
https://www.spacex.com/human-spaceflight/mars/
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20070008279/downloads/20070008279.pdf.
https://www.space.com/how-feed-one-million-mars-colonists.html.
https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/nation/2020/12/30/col…091010001/
https://eatlikeamartian.org/

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Jan 26, 2023

Cancer cells may shrink or super-size to survive

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, genetics, mathematics

Cancer cells can shrink or super-size themselves to survive drug treatment or other challenges within their environment, researchers have discovered.

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, combined biochemical profiling technologies with to reveal how lead to differences in the size of cancer cells—and how these changes could be exploited by new treatments.

The researchers believe smaller cells could be more vulnerable to DNA-damaging agents like chemotherapy combined with targeted drugs, while larger cancer cells might respond better to immunotherapy.

Jan 26, 2023

How Quantum Computing Will Transform Our World

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, encryption, finance, government, internet, mathematics, military, quantum physics, space, supercomputing, sustainability

Tech giants from Google to Amazon and Alibaba —not to mention nation-states vying for technological supremacy—are racing to dominate this space. The global quantum-computing industry is projected to grow from $412 million in 2020 to $8.6 billion in 2027, according to an International Data Corp. analysis.

Whereas traditional computers rely on binary “bits”—switches either on or off, denoted as 1s and 0s—to process information, the “qubits” that underpin quantum computing are tiny subatomic particles that can exist in some percentage of both states simultaneously, rather like a coin spinning in midair. This leap from dual to multivariate processing exponentially boosts computing power. Complex problems that currently take the most powerful supercomputer several years could potentially be solved in seconds. Future quantum computers could open hitherto unfathomable frontiers in mathematics and science, helping to solve existential challenges like climate change and food security. A flurry of recent breakthroughs and government investment means we now sit on the cusp of a quantum revolution. “I believe we will do more in the next five years in quantum innovation than we did in the last 30,” says Gambetta.

But any disrupter comes with risks, and quantum has become a national-security migraine. Its problem-solving capacity will soon render all existing cryptography obsolete, jeopardizing communications, financial transactions, and even military defenses. “People describe quantum as a new space race,” says Dan O’Shea, operations manager for Inside Quantum Technology, an industry publication. In October, U.S. President Joe Biden toured IBM’s quantum data center in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., calling quantum “vital to our economy and equally important to our national security.” In this new era of great-power competition, China and the U.S. are particularly hell-bent on conquering the technology lest they lose vital ground. “This technology is going to be the next industrial revolution,” says Tony Uttley, president and COO for Quantinuum, a Colorado-based firm that offers commercial quantum applications. “It’s like the beginning of the internet, or the beginning of classical computing.”

Jan 26, 2023

Quantum Safe Cryptography — A Quantum Leap Needed Now

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, encryption, finance, information science, internet, mathematics, quantum physics, security

Whether we realize it or not, cryptography is the fundamental building block on which our digital lives are based. Without sufficient cryptography and the inherent trust that it engenders, every aspect of the digital human condition we know and rely on today would never have come to fruition much less continue to evolve at its current staggering pace. The internet, digital signatures, critical infrastructure, financial systems and even the remote work that helped the world limp along during the recent global pandemic all rely on one critical assumption – that the current encryption employed today is unbreakable by even the most powerful computers in existence. But what if that assumption was not only challenged but realistically compromised?

This is exactly what happened when Peter Shor proposed his algorithm in 1995, dubbed Shor’s Algorithm. The key to unlocking the encryption on which today’s digital security relies is in finding the prime factors of large integers. While factoring is relatively simple with small integers that have only a few digits, factoring integers that have thousands of digits or more is another matter altogether. Shor proposed a polynomial-time quantum algorithm to solve this factoring problem. I’ll leave it to the more qualified mathematicians to explain the theory behind this algorithm but suffice it to say that when coupled with a quantum computer, Shor’s Algorithm drastically reduces the time it would take to factor these larger integers by multiple orders of magnitude.

Prior to Shor’s Algorithm, for example, the most powerful computer today would take millions of years to find the prime factors of a 2048-bit composite integer. Without Shor’s algorithm, even quantum computers would take such an inordinate amount of time to accomplish the task as to render it unusable by bad actors. With Shor’s Algorithm, this same factoring can potentially be accomplished in a matter of hours.

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Jan 25, 2023

YouTube unveils new program that enables students to earn college credits

Posted by in categories: education, mathematics

YouTube announced today that it’s partnering with Arizona State University and educational video company Crash Course to launch a new program that enables students to earn college credit. The Google-owned company says the new program, called College Foundations, is designed to create an affordable and accessible way to earn college credit.

Starting today, students can sign up for four courses that start on March 7, 2023, and are eligible for transfer credit. The program does not require applications or a minimum GPA for enrollment. It includes common first-year college courses, including Intro to Human Communication, Rhetoric and Composition, Real World College Math and US History to 1865.

The program is expected to expand to 12 available courses by January 2025 to give students a chance to receive credit for an entire first year of college. There is a $25 fee if a student elects to sign up and begin coursework, and a $400 fee to receive college credit for each course. Those who sign up before March 7 will receive a $50 discount. Courses can be taken as often as needed until the student is content with their grade. The credit can then be used at institutions that accept credits from Arizona State University.

Jan 24, 2023

General theory of relativity | General relativity explained | General relativity lecture

Posted by in categories: education, mathematics, quantum physics

#generalrelativitylecture.

General theory of relativity has got a deep understanding. In this General relativity lecture I have explained, the deep philosophical meaning of General relativity. I have also described from Special relativity when we move to General relativity, the entire notion of spacetime changes and why the mathematics becomes difficult. I have also discussed quantum mechanics and general relativity and its connection to string theory. This is a video, which discusses about the nature of development of the process and some deep philosophies which lies in the heart of spacetime.

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Jan 24, 2023

ChatGPT passes Wharton Business School’s MBA exam, gets a B

Posted by in categories: business, cybercrime/malcode, mathematics, robotics/AI

Sometimes, ChatGPT made “surprising” mistakes in school-level math.

Microsoft-backed OpenAI’s AI chatbot ChatGPT has been making headlines ever since it was released to the public on November 30. It can break down complex scientific concepts, compose poems, write stories, code, and create malware…the list is endless. OpenAI has also released a paid version of the chatbot. Known as ‘ChatGPT Professional’, it is available at $42 per month.


Bauna/iStock.

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