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Archive for the ‘health’ category: Page 149

Feb 2, 2016

Liquid Biopsy Research Tools, Services and Diagnostics: Global Markets

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

NEW YORK, Jan. 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — This BCC Research report provides an in-depth study of the liquid biopsy diagnostics industry. The global market is analyzed by application, biomarker type, analysis platform, analysis purpose and geographic region. The market sizes are given for the years 2014, 2015 and 2020.

Use this report to: Analyze the market for liquid biopsy diagnostics in depth. Gain information on liquid biopsy technologies, clinical applications, industry structure, important liquid biopsy funding initiatives, global markets, patent status and companies. Learn about some of the top research initiatives that are contributing to liquid biopsy development. Gain information on various liquid biopsy diagnostics markets, including for reproductive health, cancer and transplant diagnostics

Highlights.

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Feb 2, 2016

The Two Faces of Aging: Cancer and Cellular Senescence

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, health, life extension

Aging, inflammation, cancer, and cellular senescence are all intimately interconnected. Deciphering the nature of each thread is a tremendous task, but must be done if preventative and geriatric medicine ever hope to advance. A one dimensional analysis simply will not suffice. Without a strong understanding of the genetic, epigenetic, intercellular, and intracellular factors at work only an incomplete picture can be formed. However, even with an incomplete picture useful therapeutics can and are being developed. One face is cancer, a number of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell division. The other is slue of degenerative disorders stemming from deterioration in regenerative capacity.

Geroprotectors are a diverse and growing family of compounds that assist in preventing and reversing the unwanted side-effects of aging. Senolytics, a subset of this broad group, accomplish this feat by encouraging the removal of decrepit cells. A few examples include dasatinib, quercetin, and ABT263. Although more research must be done, there are a precious handful of studies accessible to anyone with the inclination to scroll to the works cited section of this article. Those within the life extension community and a few enlightened souls outside of it already know this, but it bears repeating: in the developed world all major diseases are the direct result of the aging process. Accepting this rather simple premise, and you really ought to, should stoke your enthusiasm for the first generation of anti-aging elixirs. Before diving into the details of this promising new pharmaceuticals we must ask what is cellular senescence? What causes it? What purpose does it serve?

Depending on the context in which they are operating a single gene can have positive or negative effects on an organism’s phenotype. Often the gene is exerting both desirable and undesirable influences at the same time. This is called antagonistic pleiotropy. For example, high levels of testosterone can confer several reproductive advantages in youth, but in elderly men can increase their likelihood of developing prostate cancer. Cellular senescence is a protective measure; it is a response to damage that could potentially turn a healthy cell into a malignant one. Understandably, this becomes considerably more complex when one is examining multiple genes and multiple pathways. Identifying all of the players involved is difficult enough. Conboy’s famous parabiosis experiment shows that alterations in the microenviornment, in this case identified and unidentified factors in the blood of young mice, can have be very beneficial to their elders. Conversely, there is a solid body of evidence that shows senescent cells can have a bad influence their neighbors. How can something similar be achieved in humans without having to surgically attach a senior citizen to a college freshman?

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Feb 1, 2016

Cancer rates still higher in Appalachia, but gap is narrowing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, health

Very messed up.


WASHINGTON, Feb. 1 (UPI) — Residents of Appalachia continue to have higher rates of cancer regardless of race and location.

Appalachia is a region of the Eastern United States defined by the presence of the Appalachian Mountains. It stretches from Mississippi to New York and includes 420 counties in 13 states and roughly 25 million people.

Continue reading “Cancer rates still higher in Appalachia, but gap is narrowing” »

Feb 1, 2016

British Researchers Get Approval to Genetically Modify Human Embryos

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, health

Less than a year after scientists in China became the first to genetically modify human embryos, a research team in Britain has been given the green light to perform similar work. It’s a huge moment in biotech history—one that could eventually lead to “designer babies.”

Last September, scientists at London’s Francis Crick Institute asked the U.K’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HEFA) for permission to perform gene editing work on human embryos. Their request has now been granted, potentially paving the way for other similar work. Human germline editing is deemed controversial because any baby born through the technique has the potential to pass those genetically modified traits down to the next generation. Advocates of the practice say it could eliminate a host of genetic diseases, while at the same time introducing the possibility of human enhancement.

“The work carried out at the Crick will be for research purposes and will look at the first seven days of a fertilized egg’s development (from a single cell to around 250 cells),” noted the lab in a statement. “The knowledge acquired from the research will be important for understanding how a healthy human embryo develops.” Geneticist Kathy Niakan will be overseeing the work.

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Jan 31, 2016

Health Apps Study Raises Questions About Digital Medicine’s Future

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, health, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

First, this study is very biased and flawed. Secondly, have the tech companies considered all of the resistance that we’re all going to face with the provider and payer communities plus their lobbyists when we try to promote medical AI, nanobots, etc.

I have seen some resistance mounted by some providers, some pharma, etc. against CRISPR. And, I believe this type of resistance is only going to hurt patients as well as many cancer survivors with a genetic predisposition to cancer, and other genetic mutations.


A study of mobile health apps’ impact on health care costs represents a limited but crucial step for assessing digital medicine.

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Jan 30, 2016

McKesson launches Clinical Programs Solution for pharmacists to manage multiple clinical programs

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Talk about streamlining and improved efficiencies in clinicals.


Livonia, MI — January 25, 2016 — McKesson Pharmacy Systems & Automation (MPS&A) announced the release of the McKesson Clinical Programs Solution™, a new platform that allows pharmacists to build customized wellness programs and maintain vendor programs for patients with specific medical conditions. The Clinical Programs Solution™ also saves pharmacists time and labor costs by automatically synchronizing the data of patients enrolled in a clinical program with McKesson’s EnterpriseRx® pharmacy management system.

“In today’s increasingly competitive healthcare reimbursement environment, pharmacies are under more pressure than ever to create and manage clinical programs that address patient wellness,” said Emilie Ray, president, McKesson Pharmacy Systems & Automation. “Our Clinical Programs Solution can help meet this challenge by providing pharmacists with a flexible, easy-to-use tool to build and manage clinical services that best suit their patients’ needs and positively impact their pharmacy’s bottom line.”

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Jan 30, 2016

Genetic engineering could thwart the Zika virus, among other mosquito-borne diseases

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, habitats, health, transportation

With the recent use of genetically engineered mosquitoes in Brazil to halt the spread of the Zika virus, we might be beginning to see some major health improvements as a consequence of the genetics revolution. A world in which mosquitoes were all but eliminated from the ecosystem would look quite different from the world of today, especially for people living in the tropics where the threat of mosquito transmitted infections does more than just mar an otherwise tranquil margarita sipped from the veranda of a beach resort. This is not to beggar the more mundane advantages of a mosquito-free habitat, but rather call attention to the fact that for large parts of the world, including Brazil, mosquitoes can be the difference between life and death.

Ironically, the genetic changes made to the Aedes aegypti mosquito in order to halt the spread of the Zika virus are deceptively simple. The company behind the project, Oxitec, used a modified version of something called the “Sterile Insect Technique” to create their hybrid specimens. The end goal of this process is to produce a male mosquito possessing a “self-limiting gene.” When these males mate with wild female mosquitoes, they create non viable offspring that perish soon after the birth. The end result is a rapid drop in the mosquito population of a given area.

When compared with some of the more hazardous forms of mosquito control currently in use such as massive spraying of DEET and chemical infusers popular throughout Asia, sterilizing mosquitoes sounds like an imminently reasonable approach. As a journalist who once saw his roadside samosa blasted by a massive spray of DEET from an oncoming municipal vehicle in India, I can personally attest to a preference for a genetic solution.

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Jan 30, 2016

FDA Guidelines Target IoT Medical Device Security

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, health, internet, security

Could the FDA crush IoT opportunities in Healthcare?


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration last week took a step toward addressing the threat the Internet of Things poses to patients and their data by releasing some proposed guidelines for managing cybersecurity in medical devices.

“A growing number of medical devices are designed to be networked to facilitate patient care. Networked medical devices, like other networked computer systems, incorporate software that may be vulnerable to cybersecurity threats,” the FDA says in its proposal.

Continue reading “FDA Guidelines Target IoT Medical Device Security” »

Jan 29, 2016

Many healthcare organizations not preparing for precision medicine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

59% of the providers surveyed recently state that they have no intentions of offering precision treatment such as CRISPR for the next 5 yrs. which means patients with MS, Dystonia, Cancer, etc. will not necessarily get proper choice of treatments that they deserve.


As the Obama administration looks to Congress to fund its $215 million Precision Medicine Initiative, a new poll of healthcare executives indicates that most hospitals and health systems are not planning on leveraging such advances in genomics and data analytics to personalize patient care.

In the poll, conducted by analytics vendor Health Catalyst, 59 percent of respondents indicated that precision medicine will not play a significant role in their organizations over the next five years.

Continue reading “Many healthcare organizations not preparing for precision medicine” »

Jan 28, 2016

C.U. Robotics Startup Revolutionizes Hospitality

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, robotics/AI

Healthcare has a new set of hospital cleaners through Maidbot.


Maidbot, an Ithaca-based startup run by Cornell students that combines hospitality and robotics, has gained attention in several competitions around the country, most recently competing against 14 other college startups in the RECESS Pitch Competition earlier this month. “With this new automated system we were really excited to revolutionize and transform the hospitality industry.” —Micah Green ’18.

Additionally, Maidbot was announced as one of 32 semi-finalists in the Student Startup Madness competition — a collegiate startup tournament at SXSW — earlier this month. If Maidbot is to win in the semi-final round, the startup will be able to pitch to investors in Austin, Texas, in March. Inspired by the television show The Jetsons, Maidbot is a robot created to assist hotel room attendants with housekeeping tasks. Micah Green ’18, a co-founder of the company, had previously worked as a room attendant at a hotel.

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