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Archive for the ‘evolution’ category: Page 58

Nov 5, 2015

Robot Evolution

Posted by in categories: ethics, evolution, robotics/AI

Advances in robotics and say that in less than fifty years “organic” (man) and the “mecca” (robots) supposedly coexist harmoniously in a civilization that if I imagine there will be little to change his ethics. MAKI360.

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Oct 22, 2015

This Is What it Looks Like When a Black Hole Shreds a Star

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution

When a star wanders too close to a black hole, immense gravitational forces begin to rip it apart in an epic cosmic slaying called a “tidal disruption event.” Some of the star’s mass is flung outward into space, while the rest is drawn in, triggering a powerful flare that showers the sky with x-rays.

Using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, a team of astronomers has now pieced together one such astronomical feasting frenzy. The event in question, appropriately named “ASASSN-14li,” was spotted near the center of PGC 043234, a galaxy that lies 290 million light years from Earth.

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Oct 3, 2015

Has Aging Been Programmed By Evolution?

Posted by in categories: evolution, life extension

Science usually approaches aging from a mechanical viewpoint, but could there be more to the story?


Why do so many scientists now believe that aging has been programmed by evolution?

Science usually approaches aging from a mechanical viewpoint, but the evolutionary theory of aging has gained more support as we observe the wide variation in aging between species.

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Sep 26, 2015

How Tomb Raider’s Lara Croft has changed over the years

Posted by in categories: entertainment, evolution

VIDEO: The evolution of the most famous gaming character over some 20 years.

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Sep 20, 2015

The dimensional aspect of existence is associated with the dimensions of space and time.

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution, information science, materials, neuroscience, particle physics, quantum physics, singularity, space

The dimensionless aspect, since it has no dimensions, is outside of space and time. This is the key aspect to existence: an aspect outside of space and time perpetually interacting dialectically with an aspect inside space and time. All of the weird and wonderful phenomena of the universe are the products of this ultimate dichotomy.

Does this sound crazy? Then consider the evidence provided by black holes.

The R = 0 Universe.

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Sep 16, 2015

Will You Join the Transhuman Evolution?

Posted by in categories: business, evolution, transhumanism

DLD (Digital-Life-Design) is a global network on innovation, digitization, science and culture which connects business, creative and social leaders, opinion-formers and influencers for crossover conversation and inspiration.

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Sep 16, 2015

DLD Magazine: “Will You Join the Transhuman Evolution?”,

Posted by in categories: business, evolution, transhumanism

DLD (Digital-Life-Design) is a global network on innovation, digitization, science and culture which connects business, creative and social leaders, opinion-formers and influencers for crossover conversation and inspiration.

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Sep 11, 2015

Will Scientists Ever Solve the Mystery of Consciousness?

Posted by in categories: evolution, neuroscience

We still have no idea how the brain produces conscious awareness. In this excellent short video produced by The Economist, various experts are called upon to explain the “hard problem” that is consciousness, and how scientists might solve this profound mystery.

For the video, The Economist gathered together an impressive collection of philosophers and scientists, including David Chalmers, Daniel Dennett, Christof Koch, Janet Metcalfe, and Marcus Raichle. Topics discussed include the evolution of consciousness, the binding problem, and theory of mind.

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Aug 23, 2015

Computer scientists have found that robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs

Posted by in categories: computing, evolution, existential risks, robotics/AI

Computer scientists have found that robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs. Beyond implications for artificial intelligence, the research supports the idea that mass extinctions actually speed up evolution by unleashing new creativity in adaptations.

Photo credit: Joel Lehman.

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Aug 20, 2015

Peto’s Paradox: Why Don’t Larger Animals Get Cancer More Often?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, life extension

If cancer is predominantly a random process, then why don’t organisms with thousands of times more cells suffer more from cancer? Large species like whales and elephants generally live longer, not shorter lives, so how are they protected against the threat of cancer?

While we have a great deal more to learn when it comes to cancer biology, the general belief is that it arises first from mutation. It’s becoming clear it’s actually an incredibly complicated process, requiring a range of variable factors such as mutation, epigenetic alteration and local environment change (like inflammation). While some students may have spent sleepless nights wondering how many mutated cells they contain after learning the fallibility of our replication mechanisms, the reality is that with such an error rate we should all be ridden with cancer in childhood — but we’re not. Our canine companions sadly often succumb around their 1st decade, but humans are actually comparatively good at dealing with cancer. We live a relatively long time in the mammal kingdom for our size and even in a modern environment, it’s predominantly an age-related disease.

While evolution may have honed replication accuracy, life itself requires ‘imperfection’ to evolve. We needed those occasional errors in germ cells to allow evolution. If keeping the odd error is either preferable or essentially not worth the energy tackling when you’re dealing with tens of trillions of cells, then clearly there is more to the story than mutation. In order to maintain a multi-cellular organism for a long enough period, considering that errors are essentially inevitable, other mechanisms must be in place to remove or quarantine problematic cells.

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