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Archive for the ‘evolution’ category: Page 57

May 24, 2016

US biochemist wins award for rewriting DNA to mimic evolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, evolution

US biochemical engineer Frances Arnold on Tuesday won a million-euro technology prize in Finland for her work on “directed evolution”, a method of rewriting DNA to improve medicines and develop green fuels.

“Frances Arnold receives the 2016 Millennium Technology Prize in recognition of her discoveries that launched the field of ‘directed evolution’, which mimics natural evolution to create new and better proteins in the laboratory,” the Technology Academy Finland, which awards the prize at two-year intervals, said in a statement.

Arnold, 59, who is a professor of chemical engineering at California Institute of Technology, said her work made it possible to “solve human problems”, such as replacing toxic chemicals like fossil fuels.

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May 19, 2016

Multicellular Life Was Caused By The Same Gene That Suppresses Cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution

Biologists have identified the one gene that caused the evolution of single-celled organisms into multicellularity, debunking previous theories that several genes were at play. The gene retinoblastoma is also the same gene that is found to be defective in cancer patients, and suppresses tumors.

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May 16, 2016

Meet George Church, the brash biologist out to upend evolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, life extension

George Church is pushing the boundaries of science!


Harvard biologist George Church wants to reverse aging, reanimate a mammoth, and build an entire human genome from scratch. What makes him tick?

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May 9, 2016

Artificial Intelligence Evolution: Future AI Technologies To Make AI Obsolete And Intertwine Physical, Digital Realities?

Posted by in categories: evolution, robotics/AI, singularity

The troubling piece of this article is that the article leaves out how the underlying technology will need to change in order for AI to truly intertwine with humans. AI in the existing infrastructure and digital technology with no support of BMI, microbots, etc. will not evolve us to Singularity by itself and without changes to the existing digital landscape.


As artificial intelligence continuously evolves, the future of AI is also becoming more significantly challenging to perceive and comprehend for humans.

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May 5, 2016

Rise Of The Machines (Part 2): Artificial Intelligence And Bots Promise To Disrupt

Posted by in categories: evolution, robotics/AI

(Source: Jimmy Pike & Christopher Wilder ©Moor Insights & Strategy)

Microsoft and Facebook recently announced how they plan to drive leadership in the digital transformation and cloud market: bots. As more companies—especially application vendors—begin to drive solutions that incorporate machine learning, natural language, artificial intelligence, and structured and unstructured data, bots will increase in relevance and value. Google’s Cloud Platform (GCP) and Microsoft see considerable opportunities to enable vendors and developers to build solutions that can see, hear and learn as well as applications that can recognize and learn from a user’s intent, emotions, face, language and voice.

Bots are not new, but they have evolved over time through the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, ubiquitous connectivity and increases in data processing speeds. In the mid-1990s, the first commercial bots were developed. For example, I was on the ground floor for the first commercial chat providers called ichat. As with many disruptive media-based technologies, as was the case with ichat, early adopters tend to be the darker side of the entertainment industry. These companies saw a way to get website visitors to stay online longer by having someone to interact with their guests at 3AM. Out of this necessity, chatbots were developed. Thankfully, the technology has evolved and now bots are mainstream and are being used to helping people perform simple tasks and interact with service providers.

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May 2, 2016

Discovery of a fundamental limit to the evolution of the genetic code

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

A study performed at IRB Barcelona offers an explanation as to why the genetic code stopped growing 3,000 million years ago. This is attributed to the structure of transfer RNAs—the key molecules in the translation of genes into proteins. The genetic code is limited to 20 amino acids—the building blocks of proteins—the maximum number that prevents systematic mutations, which are fatal for life. The discovery could have applications in synthetic biology.

Nature is constantly evolving—its limits determined only by variations that threaten the viability of species. Research into the origin and expansion of the are fundamental to explain the evolution of life. In Science Advances, a team of biologists specialised in this field explain a limitation that put the brakes on the further development of the genetic code, which is the universal set of rules that all organisms on Earth use to translate genetic sequences of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) into the that comprise the proteins that undertake cell functions.

Headed by ICREA researcher Lluís Ribas de Pouplana at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and in collaboration with Fyodor A. Kondrashov, at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and Modesto Orozco, from IRB Barcelona, the team of scientists has demonstrated that the genetic code evolved to include a maximum of 20 and that it was unable to grow further because of a functional limitation of transfer RNAs—the molecules that serve as interpreters between the language of genes and that of proteins. This halt in the increase in the complexity of life happened more than 3,000 million years ago, before the separate evolution of bacteria, eukaryotes and archaebacteria, as all organisms use the same code to produce proteins from genetic information.

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Apr 19, 2016

The Syntellect Hypothesis: Five Paradigms of the Mind’s Evolution

Posted by in categories: evolution, neuroscience

Interesting thoughts.


Book by Alex M. Vikoulov, Overview #SyntellectHypothesis

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Mar 26, 2016

Toward a realistic cosmic evolution

Posted by in categories: evolution, space, supercomputing

Using the Piz Daint supercomputer, cosmologists at the University of Geneva are the first to simulate the structure of the universe in a way that consistently accounts for the general theory of relativity.

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Mar 24, 2016

Modified NWChem Code Utilizes Supercomputer Parallelization

Posted by in categories: chemistry, climatology, evolution, materials, quantum physics, supercomputing

Quicker time to discovery. That’s what scientists focused on quantum chemistry are looking for. According to Bert de Jong, Computational Chemistry, Materials and Climate Group Lead, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), “I’m a computational chemist working extensively with experimentalists doing interdisciplinary research. To shorten time to scientific discovery, I need to be able to run simulations at near-real-time, or at least overnight, to drive or guide the next experiments.” Changes must be made in the HPC software used in quantum chemistry research to take advantage of advanced HPC systems to meet the research needs of scientists both today and in the future.

NWChem is a widely used open source software computational chemistry package that includes both quantum chemical and molecular dynamics functionality. The NWChem project started around the mid-1990s, and the code was designed from the beginning to take advantage of parallel computer systems. NWChem is actively developed by a consortium of developers and maintained by the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington State. NWChem aims to provide its users with computational chemistry tools that are scalable both in their ability to treat large scientific computational chemistry problems efficiently, and in their use of available parallel computing resources from high-performance parallel supercomputers to conventional workstation clusters.

“Rapid evolution of the computational hardware also requires significant effort geared toward the modernization of the code to meet current research needs,” states Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development at PNNL.

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Mar 17, 2016

Former NASA astronomy, relativity chief to discuss evolution of universe, from Big Bang to black holes

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution

Another amazing female pioneer in STEM and she was a NASA chief astronomer to boot!


A former chief astronomer at NASA will discuss the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to black holes during a lecture on Thursday, March 24.

It’s the opening of the 19th Annual Dick Smyser Community Lecture Series.

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