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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category: Page 71

Nov 20, 2015

The Ghost 3-axis Camera Stabilizer

Posted by in category: electronics

For more info visit: www.SICvisuals.com

Pre-Orders on our website: http://sicvisuals.com/product/ghost-pre-order/

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Nov 20, 2015

Quantum entanglement achieved at room temperature in semiconductor wafers

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics, particle physics, quantum physics

Entanglement is one of the strangest phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics, the theory that underlies most of modern physics. It says that two particles can be so inextricably connected that the state of one particle can instantly influence the state of the other, no matter how far apart they are.

Just one century ago, was at the center of intense theoretical debate, leaving scientists like Albert Einstein baffled. Today, however, entanglement is accepted as a fact of nature and is actively being explored as a resource for future technologies including quantum computers, quantum communication networks, and high-precision quantum sensors.

Entanglement is also one of nature’s most elusive phenomena. Producing entanglement between particles requires that they start out in a highly ordered state, which is disfavored by thermodynamics, the process that governs the interactions between heat and other forms of energy. This poses a particularly formidable challenge when trying to realize entanglement at the macroscopic scale, among huge numbers of particles.

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Nov 20, 2015

Moore Foundation Gives Stanford $13.5 Million To Build “Accelerator on a Chip”

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, electronics, mobile phones, particle physics, security

Today’s particle accelerators are massive machines, but physicists have been working on shrinking them down to tabletop scales for years. The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation just awarded a $13.5 million grant to Stanford University to develop a working “accelerator on a chip” the size of a shoebox over the next five years.

The international collaboration will build on prior experiments by physicists at SLAC/Stanford and Germany’s Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen-Nuremberg. If successful, the prototype could usher in a new generation of compact particle accelerators that could fit on a laboratory bench, with potential applications in medical therapies, x-ray imaging, and even security scanner technologies.

The idea is to “do for particle accelerators what the microchip industry did for computers,” SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory physicist Joel England told Gizmodo. Computers used to fill entire rooms back when they relied on bulky vacuum tube technology. The invention of the transistor and subsequent development of the microchip made it possible to shrink computers down to laptop and cell phone scales. England envisions a day when we might be able to build a handheld particle accelerator, although “there’d be radiation issues, so you probably wouldn’t want to hold one in your hand.”

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Nov 19, 2015

‘Power Over Wi-Fi’ named one of the year’s game-changing technologies

Posted by in categories: electronics, energy, internet

University of Washington engineers have developed a novel technology that uses a Wi-Fi router—a source of ubiquitous but untapped energy in indoor environments—to power devices.

The Power Over Wi-Fi (PoWiFi) system is one of the most innovative and game-changing technologies of the year, according to Popular Science, which included it in the magazine’s annual “Best of What’s New” awards announced Wednesday.

The technology attracted attention earlier this year when researchers published an online paper showing how they harvested energy from Wi-Fi signals to power a simple temperature sensor, a low-resolution grayscale camera and a charger for a Jawbone activity tracking bracelet.

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Nov 19, 2015

This self-healing sensor could make electronic skin a reality

Posted by in category: electronics

Chemical engineers in Israel have built a self-healing electronic sensor inspired by human skin that can rapidly ‘heal’ damage.

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Nov 16, 2015

Graphene Could Give Us Sleek Night Vision Sensors

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics, materials, mobile phones

Because of its unique chemical and physical properties, graphene has helped scientists design new gadgets from tiny computer chips to salt water filters. Now a team of researchers from MIT has found a new use for the 2D wonder material: in infrared sensors that could replace bulky night-vision goggles, or even add night vision capabilities to high-tech windshields or smartphone cameras. The study was published last week in Nano Letters.

Night vision technology picks up on infrared wavelengths, energy usually emitted in the form of heat that humans can’t see with the naked eye. Researchers have known for years that because of how it conducts electricity, graphene is an excellent infrared detector, and they wanted to see if they could create something less bulky than current night-vision goggles. These goggles rely on cryogenic cooling to reduce the amount of excess heat that might muddle the image. To create the sensor, the researchers integrated graphene with tiny silicon-based devices called MEMS. Then, they suspended this chip over an air pocket so that it picks up on incoming heat and eliminates the need for the cooling mechanisms found in other infrared-sensing devices. That signal is then transmitted to another part of the device that creates a visible image. When the researchers tested their sensor, they found that it clearly and successfully picked up the image of a human hand.

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Nov 10, 2015

3RDi is a Camera for the Middle of Your Forehead

Posted by in categories: electronics, privacy

Think the Google Glass camera glasses are funny looking? Check out the 3RDi. Pronounced “third eye,” it’s a new camera that lets you capture your life while you’re enjoying the moment by placing a camera smack dab in the center of your forehead, making you look like a camera cyclops.

The camera is the brainchild of a Montreal, Quebec-based startup called 3RDiTEK. Style-wise, it looks like a bright white headband with a small black camera built into the forehead section.

Continue reading “3RDi is a Camera for the Middle of Your Forehead” »

Nov 8, 2015

3D Printed Guide for Nerve Regeneration successfully tested on Animals, Clinical testing on humans to begins soon

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, electronics, engineering

According to the Mayo Clinic, the Nerve regeneration is a complex process, because of its complexity, regrowth of nerves after injury or disease is extremely rare. Nerve damages more often than not are incurable and cause permanent disability, but now the scientist has proved that Advanced 3D printing methods could hold a possible cure for such patients.

To prove the proof of concept, a physically disabled rat was chosen as a test subject. The scientist used a specially designed 3D scanners and 3D Printers to create a custom silicone guide, 3D-printed chemical cues were added to the guide to promote both motor and sensory nerve regeneration. This was then implanted into the rat with surgically grafting it to the cut ends of the nerve. The operation was a extremely successful and the rat showed tremendous improvement in the way it walked within 10 to 12 weeks.

Continue reading “3D Printed Guide for Nerve Regeneration successfully tested on Animals, Clinical testing on humans to begins soon” »

Nov 6, 2015

Researchers have designed a battery that’s 90 percent more efficient than lithium-ion

Posted by in categories: electronics, energy, mobile phones

Smartphones, laptops, and all manner of electronics have advanced by leaps in bounds over the past few decades, but an essential component of most of them — the battery, or more precisely the lithium-ion battery — hasn’t. The technological remnant of the mid-’90s has a tendency to degrade and isn’t particularly efficient, which is why scores of researchers have spent years pursuing alternatives. Until now, though, practical limitations — i.e., physical dimensions and mass manufacturing constraints — have permanently relegated many to laboratories. But a new design, a refinement of so-called lithium-air design by scientists at the University of Cambridge, looks to be one of the most feasible yet.

Lithium-air (Li-air) batteries have been around for a while — chemist K. M. Abraham is credited with developing the first rechargeable variant in 1995 — but they’ve never been considered very practical. That’s because they use carbon as an electron conductor instead of the metal-oxide found in conventional Li-ion batteries, and generate electricity from the reaction of oxygen molecules and lithium molecules, a process which leads to the production of electrically resistant lithium peroxide. As the lithium peroxide builds up, the power-producing reaction diminishes until it eventually ceases completely.

Related: Why batteries suck, and the new tech that might supercharge them.

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Nov 6, 2015

Foldable Gadgets

Posted by in category: electronics

Foldable Displays


Foldable electronics have officially arrived.

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