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Archive for the ‘cyborgs’ category: Page 8

Nov 1, 2020

Exoskeleton Suits Turn Car Factory Workers Into Human Robots

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, robotics/AI, transportation

Don’t you wish you had your own robotic exoskeleton?

This would really take away the strain in manual labor.


“In the past, the lifting workers could hardly stay after 2 years as the heavy work would burden them with injuries.”

Continue reading “Exoskeleton Suits Turn Car Factory Workers Into Human Robots” »

Oct 27, 2020

Nice! This pianist lost the ability to play after suffering nerve damage on his hands

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, transhumanism

But a pair of bionic gloves now allows him to live his passion again.

Cool! 😃


After being unable to play for more than 20 years, a special pair of bionic gloves gave Brazilian pianist João Carlos Martins the chance to relive his passion once again. ❤️ (🎥 : @maestrojoaocarlosmartins)

Continue reading “Nice! This pianist lost the ability to play after suffering nerve damage on his hands” »

Oct 27, 2020

Russian ‘Sotnik’ Combat Gear Allows Control of Micro-Drone Swarm

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, drones, robotics/AI

The future Russian soldier is going to be able to control drone swarms, have landmine proof boots and an exoskeleton/suit to enhance their physical abilities and situational awareness.


Russia will integrate the ability to control small size attack drone swarms, robots, and exoskeletons into its next-generation soldier gear, in a development that feels more like a videogame update than reality.

Oct 21, 2020

U.S. Army self-healing material

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs

Self healing material is being developed for prosthetic limbs.


This material can help us make self-healing prosthetic limbs in the future.

Oct 5, 2020

Giant electrochemical actuation in a nanoporous silicon-polypyrrole hybrid material

Posted by in categories: biological, chemistry, computing, cyborgs, sustainability

The absence of piezoelectricity in silicon makes direct electromechanical applications of this mainstream semiconductor impossible. Integrated electrical control of the silicon mechanics, however, would open up new perspectives for on-chip actuorics. Here, we combine wafer-scale nanoporosity in single-crystalline silicon with polymerization of an artificial muscle material inside pore space to synthesize a composite that shows macroscopic electrostrain in aqueous electrolyte. The voltage-strain coupling is three orders of magnitude larger than the best-performing ceramics in terms of piezoelectric actuation. We trace this huge electroactuation to the concerted action of 100 billions of nanopores per square centimeter cross section and to potential-dependent pressures of up to 150 atmospheres at the single-pore scale. The exceptionally small operation voltages (0.4 to 0.9 volts), along with the sustainable and biocompatible base materials, make this hybrid promising for bioactuator applications.

An electrochemical change in the oxidation state of polypyrrole (PPy) can increase or decrease the number of delocalized charges in its polymer backbone (1). Immersed in an electrolyte, this is also accompanied by a reversible counter-ion uptake or expulsion and thus with a marcroscopic contraction or swelling under electrical potential control, making PPy one of the most used artificial muscle materials (15).

Here, we combine this actuator polymer with the three-dimensional (3D) scaffold structure of nanoporous silicon (68) to design, similarly as found in many multiscale biological composites in nature (9), a material with embedded electrochemical actuation that consists of a few light and abundant elemental constituents (i.e., H, C, N, O, Si, and Cl).

Oct 1, 2020

Russia just released footage of a brand new combat exoskeleton in action

Posted by in category: cyborgs

Russian state-owned defense corporation Rostec has released footage of a brand-new combat exoskeleton for assault operations in action.

The video footage, published by Rostec on Monday, shows a Russian service member wielding firearms, climbing stairs, and rucking through wooded terrain while wearing the defense giant’s new ‘Shturmovik’ — or ‘Stormer’ — exoskeleton:

Sep 17, 2020

The Army wants to build a brand new exoskeleton to help soldiers ruck faster and harder

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, robotics/AI

The Army is formally moving ahead with the development and fielding of a powered exoskeleton to help soldiers move faster and carry more while reducing overall fatigue after years of experimentation and testing.

Officials with Army Futures Command are currently in the process of drafting formal requirements for an infantry exoskeleton ahead of a defense industry day sometime in November, said Ted Maciuba, deputy director of the robotic requirements division for Army Futures Command.

Breaking Defense first reported news of the fresh exoskeleton effort.

Sep 16, 2020

New bionics let us run, climb and dance | Hugh Herr

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, cyborgs, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature’s own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that’s both technical and deeply personal — with the help of ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, and performs again for the first time on the TED stage.

Continue reading “New bionics let us run, climb and dance | Hugh Herr” »

Sep 16, 2020

Doctors Are Preparing to Implant the World’s First Human Bionic Eye

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, mobile phones, neuroscience, transhumanism

It’s essentially the guts of a smartphone combined with brain-implanted micro electrodes, as TechCrunch reports. The “Gennaris bionic vision system,” a project that’s more than ten years in the making, bypasses damaged optic nerves to allow signals to be transmitted from the retina to the vision center of the brain.

The system is made up of a custom-designed headgear, which includes a camera and a wireless transmitter. A processor unit takes care of data crunching, while a set of tiles implanted inside the brain deliver the signals.

“Our design creates a visual pattern from combinations of up to 172 spots of light (phosphenes) which provides information for the individual to navigate indoor and outdoor environments, and recognize the presence of people and objects around them,” Arthur Lowery, professor at Monash University’s Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, said in a statement.

Sep 6, 2020

Brain-Computer Interfaces: An Initial Assessment

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, cyborgs, drones, law, military, neuroscience, policy

Military brain computer interface BCI — rand.


The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has invested in the development of technologies that allow the human brain to communicate directly with machines, including the development of implantable neural interfaces able to transfer data between the human brain and the digital world. This technology, known as brain-computer interface (BCI), may eventually be used to monitor a soldier’s cognitive workload, control a drone swarm, or link with a prosthetic, among other examples. Further technological advances could support human-machine decisionmaking, human-to-human communication, system control, performance enhancement and monitoring, and training. However, numerous policy, safety, legal, and ethical issues should be evaluated before the technology is widely deployed. With this report, the authors developed a methodology for studying potential applications for emerging technology. This included developing a national security game to explore the use of BCI in combat scenarios; convening experts in military operations, human performance, and neurology to explore how the technology might affect military tactics, which aspects may be most beneficial, and which aspects might present risks; and offering recommendations to policymakers. The research assessed current and potential BCI applications for the military to ensure that the technology responds to actual needs, practical realities, and legal and ethical considerations.

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