Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘cryonics’ category: Page 21

Feb 4, 2016

Wait not in vain | The Economist

Posted by in categories: business, cryonics, human trajectories, science

20160206_STP001_0

“After decades of piecemeal progress, the science of cryogenically storing human organs is warming up”

Read more

Jan 27, 2016

Official Alcor Statement Concerning Marvin Minsky

Posted by in categories: cryonics, law, life extension, nanotechnology

The legal death of Marvin Minsky was publicly reported on Monday, January 25, 2016. There has been speculation on the part of numerous individuals and publications that he may have been cryopreserved by Alcor. This notice is Alcor’s formal response to inquiries on this issue.

In a public ceremony at the Extro-3 conference in 1997, nanotechnology pioneer Eric Drexler presented Prof. Minsky with a bracelet given to all new Alcor members. This bracelet provides emergency contact information and basic instructions. Minsky has spoken publicy many times about his advocacy of overcoming aging and the inevitability of death and about cryonics (human cryopreservation) as a last resort. He was also among the 67 signatories of the Scientists Open Letter on Cryonics and a member of Alcor’s Scientific Advisory Board. This much is public knowledge. None of this necessarily means that Prof. Minsky had cryopreservation arrangements at the time of legal death. Alcor neither confirms nor denies whether Prof. Minsky had such arrangements.

Alcor’s official response may puzzle some readers, so we would like to point out the privacy options that have been and currently are available to our members. When a member signs up for cryopreservation by Alcor, they have four options:

Read more

Dec 3, 2015

Discovery Provides Hope Of More Effective, Safer Cryopreservation

Posted by in categories: cryonics, innovation, life extension, materials

Cryogenics are an old science fiction dream, but today we still struggle to store large tissues without harming them. Now a breakthrough could lead to a safer, more reliable approach.

” This could be an important step toward the preservation of more complex tissues and structures”

Overcoming past challenges

Continue reading “Discovery Provides Hope Of More Effective, Safer Cryopreservation” »

Nov 25, 2015

Company Aims To Bring Back The Dead Within 30 Years

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

Humai, a Los Angeles-based tech company, is hoping to bring back the dead within 30 years. A Los Angeles-based technology company has a goal of bringing dead people back to life within the next 30 years. Humai’s official website states that artificial intelligence and nanotechnology are being used to analyze human processes, and the creation of “an artificial body” is in the works. Once the artificial body has been perfected, the member’s brain, which will have been preserved through cryonics after death, will be implanted to direct movement and function. Helping the integration will be the extensive information the company gained while tracking each person for years during his or her life, according to the company’s founder and CEO Josh Bocanegra. An artificial intelligence app will retain the voice, personality, and behavioral patterns of each person and deploy as needed. This app is expected to launch among the membership by 2017. Aiding in this pursuit is the nanotechnology Humai is assisting in developing, which “will repair the cells destroyed in the brain after death.” The company, which employs five people total, is thus far self-funded but may be open to investments in the near future.

Read more

Nov 2, 2015

Cryonics Is No Fantasy, Should We Be Taking It Seriously?

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension, materials, neuroscience

Most science starts off at the fringe and slowly makes it way to the mainstream. Cryopreservation is commonly achieved in a laboratory setting, but for many years serious applications remained confined to science fiction. Is it time to change how we see cryonics?

The science of freezing things

Scientific research requires great storage, and huge amounts of material including cells are frozen every day to be used at the later date. If you follow the correct protocols, many forms of life can be re-awakened after their cryogenic sleep. DMSO, propylene glycol and glycerol help abolish problems like ice crystals which can rupture cells, and storage temperatures can drop to below −120 °C. At these levels biological reactions are essentially halted.

Read more

Oct 20, 2015

Scientists’ Open Letter on Cryonics

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, health, life extension, neuroscience

To whom it may concern,

Cryonics is a legitimate science-based endeavor that seeks to preserve human beings, especially the human brain, by the best technology available. Future technologies for resuscitation can be envisioned that involve molecular repair by nanomedicine, highly advanced computation, detailed control of cell growth, and tissue regeneration.

With a view toward these developments, there is a credible possibility that cryonics performed under the best conditions achievable today can preserve sufficient neurological information to permit eventual restoration of a person to full health.

Read more

Oct 20, 2015

The Scientific Basis of Cryonics

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension

What the nervous system of the roundworm, frozen embryos, and extreme hypothermia tell us about preserving the mind.

Read more

Sep 24, 2015

Losing Your Mind? Great Thinkers on the Brain

Posted by in categories: biological, biotech/medical, cryonics, neuroscience, philosophy, science, theory

Aristotle is frequently regarded as one of the greatest thinkers of antiquity. So why didn’t he think much of his brain?

In this brief history of the brain, the GPA explores what the great minds of the past thought about thought. And we discover that questions that seem to have obvious answers today were anything but self-evident for the individuals that first tackled them. And that conversely, sometimes the facts which we simply accept to be true can be blinding, preventing us from making deeper discoveries about our our world and ourselves.

Aug 4, 2015

A (Very) Brief History of Death

Posted by in categories: bionic, biotech/medical, cryonics, cyborgs, education, evolution, futurism, health, information science, life extension, science, transhumanism

“I am prepared to meet my Maker. Whether my Maker is prepared for the great ordeal of meeting me is another matter.” — Winston Churchill

Death still enjoys a steady paycheck, but being the Grim Reaper isn’t the cushy job that it used to be.

Jul 19, 2015

Cryonics firm sees market in tech’s quest for eternal youth — By Joaquin Palomino SFGate

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension

At an industrial park in San Leandro, a small group of artists, scientists and tech enthusiasts are trying to sell an alternative to death: cryonic suspension. The company, Transtime, preserves the recently deceased in liquid nitrogen under the assumption that one day the frozen cadavers can be revived.

Read more

Page 21 of 21First1415161718192021