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Archive for the ‘cosmology’ category: Page 214

Nov 5, 2016

This New Hypothesis Claims to Solve 5 of the Biggest Problems in Physics

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

Physicists have come up with a new model that they say solves five of the biggest unanswered questions in modern physics, explaining the weirdness of dark matter, neutrino oscillations, baryogenesis, cosmic inflation, and the strong CP problem all at once.

The new model, called SMASH, proposes that we only need six new particles to reconcile all of these gaps in the standard model of physics, and the team behind it says it won’t be that hard to test.

The model has been developed by a team of French and German physicists, and they say it doesn’t require any major tweaks to the standard model — just a few new additions.

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Nov 4, 2016

Scientists will try to directly image Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way

Posted by in category: cosmology

How do you directly image a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy? Using a telescope with the effective size of the Earth.

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Nov 3, 2016

Scientists May Have Identified the Particles That Make Up Dark Matter

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, supercomputing

In Brief:

  • Using an advanced supercomputer, scientists came up with a profile for dark matter, concluding that it may be made of axions of a specific type.
  • With this new information, the race is on to be the first to prove the existence of dark matter particles.

Understanding what dark matter is has proven to be amazingly difficult. Of course, one might expect this from a thing that is, for all intents and purposes, entirely invisible. Scientists have come to the conclusion that dark matter exists by observing the way gravity behaves—either our model of gravity is in need of an update, or dark matter exists. The latter is the most likely conclusion.

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Nov 2, 2016

A Supercomputer Just Solved A Big Mystery Behind Dark Matter

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, supercomputing

We now know the mass of an axion, which means we might be able to prove dark matter does indeed exist.

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Nov 2, 2016

Could A Black Hole Be Blocking The Light From That ‘Alien Megastructure’ Star?

Posted by in category: cosmology

The top 7 explanations for the star’s weird behavior, ranked roughly in order of plausibility.

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Oct 29, 2016

FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM in the Quantum world, with a NEW splitting and pairing massless Black Hole

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics

Perfect for Halloween — the big Pumpkin Star story.


According to Quantum FFF Theory, stars are formed between dual new physics black holes called Herbig Haro pressure cookers.

The dual black holes can have different sizes and different capacities to produce different sized stars.

Continue reading “FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM in the Quantum world, with a NEW splitting and pairing massless Black Hole” »

Oct 23, 2016

Physicist says our Universe could have spawned from a black hole

Posted by in categories: cosmology, mathematics, physics, singularity

According to our best understanding of the Universe, if you travel back in time as far as you can, around 13.8 billion years or so, you’ll eventually reach a singularity — a super-dense, hot, and energetic point, where the laws that govern space-time breakdown.

Despite our best attempts, we can’t peer past that singularity to see what triggered the birth of our Universe — but we do know of only one other instance in the history of our Universe where a singularity exists, and that’s inside a black hole. And the two events might have more in common than you’ve ever considered, as physicist Ethan Siegel explains over at Forbes.

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Oct 23, 2016

Our Dark-Energy-Dominated Accelerating Universe –“Flimsier Than Previously Thought”

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Five years ago, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three astronomers for their discovery, in the late 1990s, that the universe is expanding at an accelerating pace. Their conclusions were based on analysis of Type Ia supernovae — the spectacular thermonuclear explosion of dying stars — picked up by the Hubble space telescope and large ground-based telescopes. It led to the widespread acceptance of the idea that the universe is dominated by a mysterious substance named ‘dark energy’ that drives this accelerating expansion.

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Oct 22, 2016

So little we are…

Posted by in category: cosmology

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Oct 20, 2016

“Dark-Energy Star” or “Black Hole” –Scientists Question Source of LIGO Detection of Gravitational Waves

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

How, then, could we tell a gravastar from a black hole? It would be almost impossible to “see” a gravastar, because of the same effect that makes a black hole “black”: any light would be so deflected by the gravitational field that it would never reach us. However, where photons would fail, gravitational waves can succeed! It has long since been known that when black holes are perturbed, they “vibrate” emitting gravitational waves. Indeed, they behave as “bells”, that is with a signal that progressively fades away, or “ringsdown”. The tone and fading of these waves depends on the only two properties of the black hole: its mass and spin. Gravastars also emit gravitational waves when they are perturbed, but, interestingly, the tones and fading of these waves are different from those of black holes. This is a fact that was alreadyknown soon after gravastars were proposed.

After the first direct detection of gravitational waves that was announced last February by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and made news all over the world, Luciano Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany) and Cecilia Chirenti (Federal University of ABC in Santo André, Brazil) set out to test whether the observed signal could have been a gravastar or not.

When considering the strongest of the signals detected so far, i.e. GW150914, the LIGO team has shown convincingly that the signal was consistent with the a collision of two black holes that formed a bigger black hole. The last part of the signal, which is indeed the ringdown, is the fingerprint that could identify the result of the collision. “The frequencies in the ringdown are the signature of the source of gravitational waves, like different bells ring with different sound”, explains Professor Chirenti.

Continue reading “‘Dark-Energy Star’ or ‘Black Hole’ --Scientists Question Source of LIGO Detection of Gravitational Waves” »