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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 557

Feb 10, 2017

Intel researches tech to prepare for a future beyond today’s PCs

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, 4D printing, computing, quantum physics

Glad Intel is moving this dial on their side as I have said for over a year they must do this to remain relevant. I would also encourage them to enter into a large 3D/4D printer partnership to develop a high speed printer that can print diamoide particles as they will need this bi-product to ensure stability in their chips and any other QC data storage and transfer processing. I do say they will need a group focused on Quantum Bio R&D as we begin to progress more of a integrated tech-bio system approach.


Intel realizes there will be a post-Moore’s Law era and is already investing in technologies to drive computing beyond today’s PCs and servers.

The chipmaker is “investing heavily” in quantum and neuromorphic computing, said Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, during a question-and-answer session at the company’s investor day on Thursday.

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Feb 10, 2017

The Future for Financial Services

Posted by in categories: business, computing, finance, quantum physics

Of course it will; and already been tested in some institutions.


Could quantum computing change the way we look at Financial Services? Frederik Kerling, Business Consultant at Atos, considers its impact in this piece of speculative fiction.

Read more

Feb 10, 2017

Crystals for Superconduction, Quantum Computing and High Efficiency Solar Cells

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

Nice forum on QC Crystal Superconduction in Mar.


From March 8–10, 2017, an International Conference on Crystal Growth is to be held in Freiburg under the auspices of the German Association of Crystal Growth DGKK and the Swiss Society for Crystallography SGK-SSCR. The conference, jointly organized by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, the Crystallography department of the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University Freiburg and the University of Geneva, is to be held in the seminar rooms of the Chemistry Faculty of the University of Freiburg. Furthermore, the Young DGKK will hold a seminar for young scientists at Fraunhofer ISE on March 7, 2017.

“Whether for mobile communication, computers or LEDs, crystalline materials are key components of our modern lifestyle,” says Dr. Stephan Riepe, group head in the Department of Silicon Materials at Fraunhofer ISE. “Crystal growth has a long tradition and today is still far from becoming obsolete. Materials with special crystalline structure are being developed for applications in high-temperature superconductors through to low-loss power transmission. Artificial diamonds are a favorite choice for building quantum computers. At the conference, the production of silicon, III-V semiconductors and most currently perovskite layers for cost-effective high efficiency tandem solar cells will also be discussed.”

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Feb 9, 2017

Another hurdle to quantum computers cleared: Sorting machine for atoms

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Nice.


Physicists at the University of Bonn have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms. The work has now been published in Physical Review Letters.

Imagine you are standing in a grocery store buying apple juice. Unfortunately, all of the crates are half empty because other customers have removed individual bottles at random. So you carefully fill your crate bottle by bottle. But wait: The neighboring crate is filled in exactly the opposite way! It has bottles where your crate has gaps. If you could lift these bottles in one hit and place them in your crate, it would be full straight away. You could save yourself a lot of work.

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Feb 9, 2017

Dotz Nano reveals proof of concept for a new type of flash memory

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

New Graphene based flash memory card coming.


Dotz Nano (ASX: DTZ) has successfully completed a proof of concept research study into the use of Graphene Quantum Dots (GQDs) in flash memory devices with the Kyung Hee University in South Korea.

GQDs are being developed for use in various applications including medical imaging, sensing, consumer electronics, energy storage, solar cells and computer storage.

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Feb 9, 2017

Primitive Quantum Computing Helps Test Theoretical Physics

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

In Brief:

Physicists were able to simulate high-energy experimens thanks to this primitive quantum computer. Prediction of theoretical physics may soon be tested.

Our current computers are not capable of running simulations of high-energy physics experiments. However, quite recently, scientists were able to use a primitive quantum computer in the simulation of the spontaneous creation of particle-antiparticle pairs. This makes it easier for physicists to further investigate the fundamental particles. A research team published their findings in the journal, Nature.

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Feb 9, 2017

Wave of the future: Terahertz chips a new way of seeing through matter

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing

Electromagnetic pulses lasting one millionth of a millionth of a second may hold the key to advances in medical imaging, communications and drug development. But the pulses, called terahertz waves, have long required elaborate and expensive equipment to use.

Now, researchers at Princeton University have drastically shrunk much of that equipment: moving from a tabletop setup with lasers and mirrors to a pair of microchips small enough to fit on a fingertip.

In two articles recently published in the IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, the researchers describe one microchip that can generate terahertz waves, and a second chip that can capture and read intricate details of these waves.

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Feb 8, 2017

Implanted Biosensors Track Vital Signs

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

With the work we are doing on cell circuitry technology and Quantum; these implants will become more and more seamless in all living things.


A biosensor developed in Clemson University, South Carolina, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will be able to transmit information regarding blood lactate and glucose levels of a wounded soldier or of other injured patients. The biochip will be implanted in the patient’s body for a short time and will wirelessly transmit the levels of lactate and glucose to the medical staff.

The biochip, sized 2mm x 4mm x 0.5mm, is a dual sensing element coated with hydrogels to prevent it from being rejected by human tissue. The sensor has the ability to transmit life saving readings to the medical personnel. The implantation of the chip will only be temporary, although long term biochip implants are also being tested and may be used as a precaution in some cases.

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Feb 8, 2017

Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Speedy Medical Testing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, nanotechnology

Nice.


Researchers at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in the US are combining nanoscience with the principle of Faraday rotation, a magnetic phenomenon discovered in 1845, in a new method for speedy medical tests.

The team applied the magneto-optical technique, called frequency-domain Faraday rotation spectroscopy—or fd-FRS, to characterize proteins, using antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs).

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Feb 8, 2017

Large groups of photons on demand — an equivalent of photonic ‘integrated circuit’

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Our story on QC just keeps advancing as I cannot wait to see this technology on our smart devices.


Holographic atomic memory, invented and constructed by physicists from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, is the first device able to generate single photons on demand in groups of several dozen or more. The device, successfully demonstrated in practice, overcomes one of the fundamental obstacles towards the construction of some type of quantum computer.

Completely secure, high-speed quantum communication, or even a model of quantum computer, may be among the possible applications for the new source of single photons recently built at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw (UW Physics), Poland. An unprecedented feature of this new device is that for the first time it enables the on-demand production of a precisely controlled group of photons, as opposed to just a single one.

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