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Archive for the ‘biotech/medical’ category: Page 2287

Feb 2, 2017

How we can finally win the fight against aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, life extension

I really wanna know why people don’t get this.


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Feb 1, 2017

China’s Already Tested CRISPR on A Human, and the U.S. Is Next

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

The first clinical trials on humans of CRISPR-Cas9-edited genes has begun in China.

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Feb 1, 2017

Salk scientists reverse signs of aging in mice

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Scientists at the Salk Institute have found that intermittent expression of genes normally associated with an embryonic state can reverse the hallmarks of old age. This approach, which not only prompted human skin cells in a dish to look and behave young again, also resulted in the rejuvenation of mice with a premature aging disease, countering signs of aging and increasing the animals’ lifespan by 30 percent. The early-stage work provides insight both into the cellular drivers of aging and possible therapeutic approaches for improving human health and longevity.

http://www.salk.edu/news-release/turning-back-time-salk-scie…gns-aging/

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Feb 1, 2017

Clinic claims it has used stem cells to treat Down’s syndrome

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

A clinic in India says it has used stem cells to treat Down’s syndrome in up to 14 people, but the announcement has alarmed independent researchers.

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Feb 1, 2017

Yale study: Fusion of tumor cells, white blood cells may help cancer spread

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

NEW HAVEN A Yale Cancer Center researcher and his team may be closer to understanding how cancers spread throughout the body, according to a release from Yale University.

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Feb 1, 2017

Revolutionary approach for treating glioblastoma works with human cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Finally, maybe hope for GBM patients.


In a rapid-fire series of breakthroughs in just under a year, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have made another stunning advance in the development of an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a common and aggressive brain cancer. The work, published in the Feb. 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine, describes how human stem cells, made from human skin cells, can hunt down and kill human brain cancer, a critical and monumental step toward clinical trials — and real treatment.

Last year, the UNC-Chapel Hill team, led by Shawn Hingtgen, an assistant professor in the Eshelman School of Pharmacy and member of the Lineberger Comprehensive Care Center, used the technology to convert mouse skin cells to stem cells that could home in on and kill human brain cancer, increasing time of survival 160 to 220 percent, depending on the tumor type. Now, they not only show that the technique works with human cells but also works quickly enough to help patients, whose median survival is less than 18 months and chance of surviving beyond two years is 30 percent.

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Feb 1, 2017

Scientists show deep brain stimulation blocks heroin relapse in rats

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can greatly reduce the compulsion to use heroin in standard rat models of addiction.

Rats that were used to taking , and normally would have self-administered more and more of the drug, did not escalate their intake when treated with DBS.

The treatment involves the weak electrical stimulation, via implanted electrodes, of a brain region called the subthalamic .

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Feb 1, 2017

Mapping the Brain Before Surgery for Epilepsy

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

https://youtube.com/watch?v=eEHVS0URsWE

Great method btw.


Epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder in the United States. Patients who have it are of all ages and it can seriously limit one’s ability to enjoy life. It’s a spectrum disorder which means the kinds of seizures people suffer and how they are managed will vary depending on the patient. Currently about 3 million people in the US are living with epilepsy and experts predict that at least 1 in 26 people will develop epilepsy at some point in their lifetime. While epilepsy is most often treated with anti-seizure medication, there are some patients who have not benefitted from medication. This form of the disorder is called drug-resistant epilepsy and can be very difficult to treat.

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Feb 1, 2017

Is There a Link Between Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer?

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Certainly explains patterns in certain families.


TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Developing or worsening type 2 diabetes could be an early sign of pancreatic cancer, new research suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly a million patients with type 2 diabetes or pancreatic cancer in Italy and Belgium. Half of all pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed within a year of patients being diagnosed with diabetes, the findings showed.

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Feb 1, 2017

Missouri S&T researcher works to develop nanodiamond materials

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, military, nanotechnology, particle physics

Nice.


When you think of diamonds, rings and anniversaries generally come to mind. But one day, the first thing that will come to mind may be bone surgery. By carefully designing modified diamonds at the nano-scale level, a Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher hopes to create multifunctional diamond-based materials for applications ranging from advanced composites to drug delivery platforms and biomedical imaging agents.

Dr. Vadym Mochalin, an associate professor of chemistry and materials science and engineering at Missouri S&T, is characterizing and modifying 5-nanometer nanodiamond particles produced from expired military grade explosives so that they can be developed to perform specific tasks. His current research studies their use as a filler in various types of composites.

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