Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘biotech/medical’ category: Page 2057

Aug 20, 2017

China rushes into embryo selection

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, genetics, government

China’s five year plan to eliminate birth defects by preimplantation genetic diagnosis of embryos.

Gene-editing with CRISPR has been in the headlines over the past month and touted as a way of eliminating genetic diseases. But the cruder and cheaper technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis does the same. And it is exploding in China. According to a feature in Nature, fertility doctors there “have been pursuing a more aggressive, comprehensive and systematic path towards its use there than anywhere else”.

The government’s current five-year plan for economic development has made reproductive medicine, including PGD, a priority. In 2004, only four clinics in the whole country were licensed to perform PGD; now there are 40.

Continue reading “China rushes into embryo selection” »

Aug 19, 2017

Scientists remotely hacked a brain, controlling body movements

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology, neuroscience

Imagine someone remotely controlling your brain, forcing your body’s central processing organ to send messages to your muscles that you didn’t authorize. It’s an incredibly scary thought, but scientists have managed to accomplish this science fiction nightmare for real, albeit on a much small scale, and they were even able to prompt their test subject to run, freeze in place, or even completely lose control over their limbs. Thankfully, the research will be used for good rather than evil… for now.

Don’t Miss : Comcast’s surprisingly good wireless plans now available nationwide

The effort, led by physics professor Arnd Pralle, PhD, of the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences, focused on a technique called “magneto-thermal stimulation.” It’s not exactly a simple process — it requires the implantation of specially built DNA strands and nanoparticles which attach to specific neurons — but once the minimally invasive procedure is over, the brain can be remotely controlled via an alternating magnetic field. When those magnetic inputs are applied, the particles heat up, causing the neurons to fire.

Read more

Aug 19, 2017

This Powerful New Painkiller Could Be The Unexpected Ticket to Replacing Opioids

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Researchers have developed a new class of pain relief that acts on an obscure nerve pathway, opening the way to a medication just as concerns have deepened around the US opioid addiction and overdose epidemic.

While any marketable pharmaceutical based on the discovery would still need to go through the long process of clinical testing, the compound appears to work as well as other opioid-alternatives, requiring a smaller dose and remaining effective for a longer period.

The research led by scientists from The University of Texas has identified a group of molecules that bind with a pair of nerve receptors, one of which has been a mystery until recently.

Continue reading “This Powerful New Painkiller Could Be The Unexpected Ticket to Replacing Opioids” »

Aug 19, 2017

The U.S. Military Wants to Inject People’s Brains With Painkilling Nanobots That Could Replace Medicine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, government, military, nanotechnology, neuroscience

Ever wish you could heal yourself like a superhero? The government is making it happen. Sort of.

Read more

Aug 19, 2017

Vitamin C helps genes to kill off cells that would cause cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

By Aylin Woodward

Injections of vitamin C could be a way to help fight blood cancer. Experiments in mice suggest that the nutrient helps tell out-of-control cells to stop dividing and die.

Some blood cancers, including acute and chronic leukaemia, often involve mutations affecting a gene called TET2. This gene usually helps ensure that a type of stem cell matures properly to make white blood cells, and then eventually dies. But when TET2 mutates, these cells can start dividing uncontrollably, leading to cancer. Mutations in TET2 are involved in around 42,500 cancers in the US a year.

Continue reading “Vitamin C helps genes to kill off cells that would cause cancer” »

Aug 19, 2017

Sharp X-ray pulses from the atomic nucleus

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

X-rays make the invisible visible: they permit the way materials are structured to be determined all the way down to the level of individual atoms. In the 1950s it was x-rays which revealed the double-helix structure of DNA. With new x-ray sources, such as the XFEL free-electron laser in Hamburg, it is even possible to “film” chemical reactions. The results obtained from studies using these new x-ray sources may be about to become even more precise. A team around Kilian Heeg from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg has now found a way to make the spectrum of the x-ray pulses emitted by these sources even narrower. In contrast to standard lasers, which generate light of a single colour and wavelength, x-ray sources generally produce pulses with a broad spectrum of different wavelengths. Sharper pulses could soon drive applications that were previously not feasible. This includes testing physical constants and measuring lengths and times even more precisely than can be achieved at present.

Researchers use light and other electromagnetic radiation for developing new materials at work in electronics, automobiles, aircraft or power plants, as well as for studies on biomolecules such as protein function. Electromagnetic radiation is also the tool of choice for observing chemical reactions and physical processes in the micro and nano ranges. Different types of spectroscopy use different individual wavelengths to stimulate characteristic oscillations in specific components of a structure. Which wavelengths interact with the structure – physicists use the term – tells us something about their composition and how they are constructed; for example, how atoms within a molecule are arranged in space.

In contrast to visible light, which has a much lower energy, x-rays can trigger resonance not just in the electron shell of an atom, but also deep in the atomic core, its nucleus. X-ray spectroscopy therefore provides unique knowledge about materials. In addition, the resonances of some atomic nuclei are very sharp, in principle allowing extremely precise measurements.

Read more

Aug 19, 2017

Leave the Drones to Tesla

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, drones, robotics/AI, sustainability

Did you know that Nikola Tesla patented a drone before there were drones?! Over 100 years ago he called these imagined vessels as being used to carry packages, establish communication with inaccessible regions, and “many other scientific purposes.” Drones are basically in the brand’s DNA, so it’s no wonder that there is so much hype around what a Tesla drone might be like! In this concept, called Aurora, Tesla’s electric motor technology is applied to a tricopter design to facilitate long-range, extended-time camera capability.

Operating either autonomously or controlled manually, it’s ideal for reconnaissance, checking on out-of-reach machinery, routine structure inspections, or simply for capturing vivid photography and video for fun. The three rotor design allows for larger propellers. This results in less required rotations and less energy to fly, making it more efficient with up to 35% more battery life. Because of the size of the propellers, it also has greater acceleration and better maneuverability. As far as looks go, it’s carefully considered and beautifully executed sculpting that’s probably the e-drone concept most closely in line with the Tesla aesthetic.

Designer: Alberto Esses

Continue reading “Leave the Drones to Tesla” »

Aug 18, 2017

Reactivating Stem Cells Regrows Hair

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Researchers at UCLA have offered new hope to people losing their hair. These scientists have discovered a way to activate stem cells in the follicles to make hair grow again.

The new study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology gives us a tantalizing hint that we can restore hair growth and treat conditions such as baldness and alopecia[1]. These conditions are associated with hormonal imbalance, stress, aging, and chemotherapy treatment.

Read more

Aug 17, 2017

Scientists Have Developed a New Method to 3D-Print Living Tissue

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, food, habitats

Cell by Cell

3D-printing technology has made significant strides over the past several years. What started as a tool for producing small objects can now be used to craft food, build houses, and even construct “space fabric.”

Continue reading “Scientists Have Developed a New Method to 3D-Print Living Tissue” »

Aug 17, 2017

Aging Hearts Find a New Lease of Life

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

According to a new study, aging hearts might find a new lease on life. Researchers have demonstrated that stem cells taken from young rats and given to aged rats rejuvenated their hearts, making them functionally younger in a number of ways.

Young at heart

The new study published in the European Heart Journal investigated the effects of cardiac stem cells on the function and structure of aged hearts[1]. There have been previous experiments using cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) that have delivered promising results, but they have never been tested in relation to aging.

Read more