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Archive for the ‘evolution’ category

Nov 4, 2017

Cyborgs Among Us

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, evolution, transhumanism

This film “Cyborgs Among Us” that has a segment on my #transhumanism work (as well as many others in our community) has its #Dutch premier on Nov 10 in a major international science film festival. Go see it if you can!


Imagine having a sixth sense! These are the first cyborgs that transcend the boundaries of human possibility and spark the debate about the technological evolution of mankind. Cyborgs Among Us offers insight into how technology can become part of us and the social and ethical implications associated with it.

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Oct 25, 2017

Octopuses Edit Their Genetic Code Like No Other Animal

Posted by in categories: evolution, genetics

Cephalopods can make sweeping changes to their RNA, favoring individual adaptations over species-level evolution.

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Oct 20, 2017

Synthetic Biology and Evolution

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, evolution

Darwinian evolution is old-fashioned. Bioengineering raises new principles for the creation of life but, to what extent can we dispense with the past of our biology.

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Oct 15, 2017

The nature of warfare is changing. It’s time governments caught up

Posted by in categories: evolution, military

The future of military success will now be owned by those who conceive, design, build and operate combinations of information-based technologies to deliver new combat power. Caution, bureaucratic inertia, vested interest and institutional preference for evolution won’t work: this will only leave room for competitors to steal decisive advantage in the most challenging of competitions on Earth.


Unless the private and public sectors start sharing ideas, the UK will be left behind in the new arms race says former Joint Forces Command chief Richard Barrons.

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Oct 9, 2017

Evolution of Video Game Graphics 1962–2017

Posted by in categories: entertainment, evolution

Click on photo to start video.

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Sep 16, 2017

Dangerous Things

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, evolution

We believe our bodies are our own, to do with what we want. Biohacking is leading the next phase of human evolution, and we’re excited to be a part of it.

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Sep 15, 2017

Why we did not evolve to live forever: Unveiling the mystery of why we age

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) in Mainz, Germany, have made a breakthrough in understanding the origin of the ageing process. They have identified that genes belonging to a process called autophagy — one of the cells most critical survival processes — promote health and fitness in young worms but drive the process of ageing later in life. This research published in the journal Genes & Development gives some of the first clear evidence for how the ageing process arises as a quirk of evolution. These findings may also have broader implications for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease where autophagy is implicated. The researchers show that by promoting longevity through shutting down autophagy in old worms there is a strong improvement in neuronal and subsequent whole body health.

Getting old, it’s something that happens to everyone and nearly every species on this planet, but the question is, should it? In a recent publication in the journal Genes & Development titled “Neuronal inhibition of the nucleation complex extends lifespan in post-reproductive C. elegans,” the laboratory of Dr Holger Richly at IMB, has found some of the first genetic evidence that may put this question to rest.

As Charles Darwin explained, natural selection results in the fittest individuals for a given environment surviving to breed and pass on their genes to the next generation. The more fruitful a trait is at promoting reproductive success, the stronger the selection for that trait will be. In theory, this should give rise to individuals with traits which prevent ageing as their genes could be passed on nearly continuously. Thus, despite the obvious facts to the contrary, from the point of evolution ageing should never have happened. This evolutionary contradiction has been debated and theorised on since the 1800s. It was only in 1953 with his hypothesis of antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) that George C. Williams gave us a rational explanation for how ageing can arise in a population through evolution. Williams proposed that natural selection enriches genes promoting reproductive success but consequently ignores their negative effects on longevity.

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Sep 3, 2017

The Dangers of CRISPR, Designer Babies, and Artificial Genetic Mutation

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

Announcement of CRISPR technology, which allows precise editing of the human genome, has been heralded as the future of individualized medicine, and a decried as a slippery slope to engineering individual human qualities. Of course, humans already know how to manipulate animal genomes through selective breeding, but there has been no appetite to try on humans what is the norm for dogs. That’s a good thing, says Dawkins. The results could well be dangerous. Does technology as a whole represent a threat to human welfare if it continues to evolve at its current rate? Not so fast, warns Dawkins. Comparing biological evolution to technological progress is an analogy at best. His newest book is Science in the Soul: Selected Writings of a Passionate Rationalist.

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Aug 26, 2017

Who are you? How the story of human origins is being rewritten

Posted by in categories: evolution, neuroscience

Think again, because over the past 15 years, almost every part of our story, every assumption about who our ancestors were and where we came from, has been called into question. The new insights have some unsettling implications for how long we have walked the earth, and even who we really are.


The past 15 years have called into question every assumption about who we are and where we came from. Turns out our evolution is more baffling than we thought.

By Colin Barras

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Aug 24, 2017

Futurist Gray Scott: We are Part of a Technological Cosmos

Posted by in categories: biological, bionic, electronics, evolution, futurism, human trajectories, innovation, media & arts, philosophy, robotics/AI

How will our relationship to technology evolve in the future? Will we regard it as something apart from ourselves, part of ourselves, or as a new area of evolution? In this new video from the Galactic Public Archives, Futurist Gray Scott explains that we are a part of a technological cosmos. Do you agree with Scott that technology is built into the universe, waiting to be discovered?

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