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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 168

May 29, 2017

For The First Time Ever, CRISPR Gene Editing Was Used in Humans. So What’s Next?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, space

  • With Chinese scientists announcing that they have tested CRISPR on a human for the first time, the U.S. must decide soon whether it will be a leader or a follower in advancing the tech.
  • While gene editing technology could be used in nefarious ways, it could also cure diseases and improve millions of lives, but we won’t know how effective it is until we begin human trials.

While the middle part of the 20th century saw the world’s superpowers racing to explore space, the first global competition of this century is being set in a much smaller arena: our DNA.

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May 27, 2017

5 Emerging Biomedical Engineering Trends to Watch

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Biomedical engineering has long been a driver of advances in healthcare. From new technologies to diagnose and treat some of the most complex disease to advances that improve quality of life for everyone, the work taking place in labs around the world right now is likely to change the face of healthcare in both the short- and long-term future.

Although there are literally thousands of different projects taking place at this very moment, there are some definite trends taking place in biomedical engineering.

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May 22, 2017

MIT used bacteria to create a self-ventilating workout shirt

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, wearables

Many rain jackets have zippers at the armpits that, when opened, let out perspiration and funk that would otherwise stay trapped inside. But researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a prototype of a wearable that vents itself automatically in response to sweat—and it does so using bacteria.

Wen Wang, the lead author of a new study about biohybrid wearables in the journal Science Advances, says that the garment with bacteria-triggered vents represents just a stepping stone on their way to creating shirts that do something even better: produce a pleasant smell when you sweat.

To make the prototype garment, the researchers experimented with different structures of latex and bacteria, says Wang, a bioengineer and former research scientist at MIT’s Media Lab and the university’s department of chemical engineering. One such configuration involved just two layers: bacteria on one side, and latex on the other. But what worked best for creating the vented wearable was coating latex on both sides with a type of bacteria called B. subtilis.

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May 18, 2017

A Bioengineered ‘Pancreas’ Has Ended One Diabetic’s Need For Insulin

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Even the most exciting breakthrough medical treatment can be rendered obsolete by a particularly insurmountable obstacle: time.

If a treatment only works temporarily, it has little chance of making a significant difference in the lives of patients, which is why the latest news from the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute is so exciting.

Continue reading “A Bioengineered ‘Pancreas’ Has Ended One Diabetic’s Need For Insulin” »

May 17, 2017

A bioprosthetic ovary created using 3D printed microporous scaffolds restores ovarian function in sterilized mice

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cyborgs

3D printed ovaries restore fertility to mice. Another step towards more complex organs.


There is a clinical need to develop a bioengineering system to support ovary transplantation. Here, the authors generate a bioprosthetic ovary using 3D printed scaffolds of varying pore architectures to support follicle survival and ovarian function in sterilized mice.

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May 17, 2017

CellAge Has Secured a Seed Fundraising Round

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, life extension

CellAge, the synthetic biology company are going from strength to strength thanks to the support of the community last year during their fundraiser at Lifespan.io.


CellAge is featured in Startup Lithuania. As many of you will recall, CellAge hosted a successful project with us at Lifespan.io and they are busy developing a new aging biomarker for researchers thanks to the support of the community.

Now they are going from strength to strength having just secured a seed round backed by Michael Greve’s Kizoo Technology Capital and other investors.

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May 14, 2017

Humans Can Now “Print” Genetic Code and Engineer Life

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics

Scientists’ ability to create organisms through synthetic biology is getting easier and cheaper fueling the start of a new era in biology. Synthetic biology has already lead to some innovations such as lab-grown meat, advancement in medicine, and even helping to bring back extinct species.

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May 12, 2017

These Cells Are Engineered to Be Controlled by a Smartphone

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, terrorism

To Dr. Mark Gomelsky, a professor at the University of Wyoming, genetically engineered therapeutic cells are like troops on a mission.

The first act is training. Using genetic editing tools such as CRISPR, scientists can “train” a patient’s own cells to specifically recognize and attack a variety of enemies, including rogue tumor soldiers and HIV terrorists.

Then comes the incursion. Engineered cells are surgically implanted to the target site, where they’re left to immediately carry out the mission. The problem, says Gomelsky, is adding a command center “that could coordinate their activities in real time according to the developing situation,” such as telling cells when to activate and when to stop.

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May 12, 2017

Are You Drinking the Transhumanist Kool-Aid?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, economics, Elon Musk, geopolitics, information science, law, life extension, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, space, transhumanism

A new story out on #transhumanism:


In the Basic Income America Facebook group, Zoltan Istvan, a transhumanist who recently ran for president, shared his Wired article, Capitalism 2.0: the economy of the future will be powered by neural lace. He (along with many others) argues Wall Street, law offices, engineering firms, and more will soon be mostly void of humans.

I think I mostly agree with him. Algorithms will far surpass human ability to achieve the best possible outcomes (Nash equilibrium). Having read Super Intelligence, the Master Algorithm, The Age of Em, books on evolution, lectures, interviews, etc… I think we’re approaching an important moment in human history where we have to figure out morality so we can build it into the proto-AI children we are giving birth to. I’ve even toyed around with a fun idea related to the simulation hypothesis. Maybe we exist as a simulation, repeating the birth of AI over and over again until we figure out a way to do it without destroying ourselves or turning the universe into computonium.

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May 3, 2017

Tensions Flare as Scientists Go Public With Plan to Build Synthetic Human DNA

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

One of the greatest ethical debates in science — manipulating the fundamental building blocks of life — is set to heat up once more.

According to scientists behind an ambitious and controversial plan to write the human genome from the ground up, synthesising DNA and incorporating it into mammalian and even human cells could be as little as four to five years away.

Nearly 200 leading researchers in genetics and bioengineering are expected to attend a meeting in New York City next week, to discuss the next stages of what is now called the Genome Project-write (GP-write) plan: a US$100 million venture to research, engineer, and test living systems of model organisms, including the human genome.

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