Menu

Blog

Page 9801

Oct 31, 2016

No Technology Thrives Alone: Progress Is All About Convergence

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, computing, Ray Kurzweil

15 years ago, Ray Kurzweil published one of the most significant essays in the history of futurism: “The Law of Accelerating Returns.” This piece showcased the immense power of exponential technology versus linear technology and became a pivotal concept for anyone trying to anticipate what the future held.

The essay predicted advances in business and technology with eerie precision, including how exponential growth would ripple through any technology that became an information technology, such as computing, biotechnology, or energy.

[ Go here to learn more about the law of accelerating returns ]

Continue reading “No Technology Thrives Alone: Progress Is All About Convergence” »

Oct 31, 2016

A Revolution in Heart Surgery: Scientists Create Artificial Blood Vessels That Grow Normally

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

In Brief:

  • New artificial blood vessels were able to grow with the recipient in recent animal testing
  • Researchers saw a 56% increase in diameter made of patients’ own cells.

We have sufficiently advanced medicine to the point that artificial body parts are no longer science fiction. In fact, we may even start 3D printing organs, or have them grown in a lab. However, their artificial nature often means they won’t grow with a patient. For example, children need to undergo repeated surgeries until adulthood to replace implants they have outgrown.

Read more

Oct 31, 2016

Diminishing Bitcoin Mining Rewards

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, economics, internet, privacy

By now, most Bitcoin and Blockchain enthusiasts are aware of four looming issues that threaten the conversion of Bitcoin from an instrument of academics, criminal activity, and closed circle communities into a broader instrument that is fungible, private, stable, ubiquitous and recognized as a currency—and not just an investment unit or a transaction instrument.

These are the elephants in the room:

  • Unleashing high-volume and speedy transactions
  • Governance and the concentration of mining influence among pools, geography or special interests
  • Privacy & Anonymity
  • Dwindling mining incentives (and the eventual end of mining). Bitcoin’s design eventually drops financial incentives for transaction validation. What then?

As an Op-Ed pundit, I value original content. But the article, below, on Bitcoin fungibility, and this one on the post-incentive era, are a well-deserved nod to inspired thinking by other writers on issues that loom over the cryptocurrency community.

This article at Coinidol comes from an unlikely source: Jacob Okonya is a graduate student in Uganda. He is highly articulate, has a keen sense of market economics and the evolution of technology adoption. He is also a quick study and a budding columnist.

Continue reading “Diminishing Bitcoin Mining Rewards” »

Oct 31, 2016

Bitcoin Fungibility: A Benefit of privacy & anonymity

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, economics, internet, privacy

I was pointed to this article by Jon Matonis, Founding Director, Bitcoin Foundation. I was sufficiently moved to highlight it here at Lifeboat Foundation, where I am a contributing writer.

On Fungibility, Bitcoin, Monero and ZCash … [backup]

This is among the best general introductions I have come across on traceability and the false illusion of privacy. The explanation of coin mixing provides and coin_mixing-03excellent, quick & brief overview.

Regarding transaction privacy, a few alt-coins provide enhanced immunity or deniability from forensic analysis. But if your bet is on Bitcoin (as it must be), the future is headed toward super-mixing and wallet trading by desgin and by default. Just as the big email providers haved added secure transit,
Bitcoin will eventually be fully randomized and anonymized per trade and even when assets are idle. It’s not about criminals; it’s about protecting business, government and individuals. It’s about liberty and our freedoms. [Continue below image]

Continue reading “Bitcoin Fungibility: A Benefit of privacy & anonymity” »

Oct 31, 2016

Who Will Be First To “Hack The Code” Of Aging?

Posted by in category: life extension

A race to the finish.

Read more

Oct 31, 2016

Michael Fossel on Aging and the Telomerase Revolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension, singularity

https://www.singularityweblog.com/mic

Dr. Michael Fossel is one of those few theoreticians who can see much of the big picture of aging. While some use mostly guesswork, and others hope to improve on that with logic, Fossel never shies away from the clear verdict that only data can give. Add his overwhelming compassion as a human being and you will understand why he is a clinician who really cares. You will also get a pretty good idea of what kind of a person Michael is – both personally and professionally. And those are just some of the reasons why enjoy having him back on my Singularity 1on1 podcast for an in-depth discussion of his latest book on the topic titled the Telomerase Revolution.

Continue reading “Michael Fossel on Aging and the Telomerase Revolution” »

Oct 31, 2016

Elon Musk Unveils ‘Solar Roof ’

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, solar power, sustainability

Elon Musk Unveils ‘Solar Roof ‘

Read more

Oct 31, 2016

Tiny swarm bots form a queue

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

These little robots can swarm like insects — or form an orderly queue. (Original video from the University of Toronto: http://ow.ly/VWUu305GNKK)

Read more

Oct 31, 2016

The world in 2045, according to the Pentagon

Posted by in category: military

Some predictions for 2045, from the Pentagon.

Read more

Oct 30, 2016

Breaking into the Simulated Universe

Posted by in categories: computing, Elon Musk, ethics, internet, neuroscience

I argued in my 2015 paper “Why it matters that you realize you’re in a Computer Simulation” that if our universe is indeed a computer simulation, then that particular discovery should be commonplace among the intelligent lifeforms throughout the universe. The simple calculus of it all being (a) if intelligence is in part equivalent to detecting the environment (b) the environment is a computer simulation © eventually nearly all intelligent lifeforms should discover that their environment is a computer simulation. I called this the Savvy Inevitability. In simple terms, if we’re really in a Matrix, we’re supposed to eventually figure that out.

Silicon Valley, tech culture, and most nerds the world over are familiar with the real world version of the question are we living in a Matrix? The paper that’s likely most frequently cited is Nick Bostrom’s Are you living in a Computer Simulation? Whether or not everyone agrees about certain simulation ideas, everyone does seem to have an opinion about them.

Recently, the Internet heated up over Elon Musk’s comments at a Vox event on hot tub musings of the simulation hypothesis. Even Bank of America published an analysis of the simulation hypothesis, and, according to Tad Friend in an October 10, 2016 article published in New Yorker, “two tech billionaires have gone so far as to secretly engage scientists to work on breaking us out of the simulation.”

Read more